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_Keith

Sugar Cane Cuttings?

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_Keith

I just scored some new sugar cane, really thick dark purple stalks, but its too late to plant outdoors. I assume I can't let it sit around for another 2 months and have it still be viable. So, until temps warm up enough to plant it out in the ground, what is the best technique for starting this in pots. Light, soil, fertilizer, any details appreciated.

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ariscott

Hhmmm.... might not be applicable to you, but I usually just lay the cutting on the ground... and it will grow from the nodes...

Regards, Ari :)

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Jeff zone 8 N.C.

Just put the cuttings vertically in water with a few nodes above the water and a couple below. They will form roots in the water and sprouts above. Keep the water fresh if it starts to discolor. Do keep them in high light and warm temps if you can. Plant the rooted cuttings come spring. It's not a bad idea to save a cutting to re-root in water before planting out so you have a back up. It's not really needed with sugar cane but if you have any type of willow tree around (weeping willow or native) root two or three cuttings of it in the same container as the sugar cane. The willow will give off helpful rooting compounds.

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Walter John

Hi Keith, could we see a pic of the mother plant or similar ?

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_Keith

Hhmmm.... might not be applicable to you, but I usually just lay the cutting on the ground... and it will grow from the nodes...

Regards, Ari :)

Ari, the issue is cold, tonight we'll get down of -2C. We probably have another 5 weeks of cold weather, but spring arrives.

Once established sugracane will overwinter here easily, growing as a perennial, but planting is generally done in early fall so it will establish before the cold arrives. I planted some in winter a few years ago, only to never see it again.

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ariscott

Well... put it in a longish pots (like a planter box or something) and grow it inside or protected spot waiting for spring...

Or get another cutting when the weather is warming up??

Regards, Ari :)

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_Keith

Hi Keith, could we see a pic of the mother plant or similar ?

Wal, I don't have a clue as the origin. They were selling sticks at a vegetable stand in a nearby city. I just happened to spot them. This is a dark purple cane. It is popular because you can still take a pocket knife and cut strips to chew on. The new varieties that have been grown here for the last decade or longer have higher sugar content, but they are hard as a rock, quite literally. Jaws from the James Bond movie couldn't chew this new stuff.

But with a little luck, I'll be able to post some fine pictures later this summer.

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Walter John

Here's my purple sugar cane this morning, it has loved all the rain and it is in a well drained position (unlike some of my Dypsis palms which have suffered).

post-51-009349000 1296856231_thumb.jpg

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Wai`anae Steve

Hi Keith, could we see a pic of the mother plant or similar ?

Wal, I don't have a clue as the origin. They were selling sticks at a vegetable stand in a nearby city. I just happened to spot them. This is a dark purple cane. It is popular because you can still take a pocket knife and cut strips to chew on. The new varieties that have been grown here for the last decade or longer have higher sugar content, but they are hard as a rock, quite literally. Jaws from the James Bond movie couldn't chew this new stuff.

But with a little luck, I'll be able to post some fine pictures later this summer.

AsI understand it, plantations developed the "hard" cane to counter rats chewing on the canes.

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