Jump to content
PalmGuyWC

BUTIA X PARAJUBAEA

Recommended Posts

PalmGuyWC

Darold,

Thanks for the shot of "daddy." It's the most famous Parajubaea Cocoides in Nothern California, and it has children spread around the globe.

Dick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ErikSJI

Darold,

Thanks for the shot of "daddy." It's the most famous Parajubaea Cocoides in Nothern California, and it has children spread around the globe.

Dick

And how many babies has it had? And why is it the most famous?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmGuyWC

Erik,

Mature Parajubaeas are very rare in N. Calif. I doubt if there are half a dozen mature ones, blooming ones. There are some larger ones growing in our Palm Garden in Oakland, but they are to tall to reach the flowers, and the Park people frown on ladders in the garden or screens over the fruit. The garden is full of squirrels and they eat all the seeds. They are also hard to photograph because they are crowded by other palms.

Darold has the only Parajubaea that is accessible to collect pollen. It's from Darold's palm that all the pollen has come from to create the B X P hybrids. His tree also stands alone and it's easy to photograph. Photos of his palm have appeared in several publications.

I don't know how many B X P hybrids Patrick has produced, but there are not that many. It's not the eassyist hybrid to produce.

Dick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ErikSJI

Erik,

Mature Parajubaeas are very rare in N. Calif. I doubt if there are half a dozen mature ones, blooming ones. There are some larger ones growing in our Palm Garden in Oakland, but they are to tall to reach the flowers, and the Park people frown on ladders in the garden or screens over the fruit. The garden is full of squirrels and they eat all the seeds. They are also hard to photograph because they are crowded by other palms.

Darold has the only Parajubaea that is accessible to collect pollen. It's from Darold's palm that all the pollen has come from to create the B X P hybrids. His tree also stands alone and it's easy to photograph. Photos of his palm have appeared in several publications.

I don't know how many B X P hybrids Patrick has produced, but there are not that many. It's not the eassyist hybrid to produce.

Dick

Darold does not have the only Parajubaea that is accessible to collect pollen. I have been receiving my pollen from California from this tree. It has put off 3 inflorescence this year.

post-1930-031464900 1311088997_thumb.jpg

post-1930-087499700 1311089028_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmGuyWC

I'm sure there are many mature Parajubaeas in S. Calif., but I was only talking about N. Calif. A half a dozen was only a guess, and I suppose there are some that are hidden away that I don't know about.

Dick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ErikSJI

I'm sure there are many mature Parajubaeas in S. Calif., but I was only talking about N. Calif. A half a dozen was only a guess, and I suppose there are some that are hidden away that I don't know about.

Dick

If Darolds profile is correct it would place him in San Francisco. This one is further north of him.

Do you think the difficulty of the cross is due to less pollen? The inflorescence from this palm is a pain to extract pollen from. I tried the old rolling pin method the first time then screened it and did not get much pollen and only got 70 seeds to set. The second time around we used a different method and extracted a lot more pollen both the butia's are holding over 150 seed each. Hopefully the germination is not as disappointing as the seed output.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ErikSJI

I'm sure there are many mature Parajubaeas in S. Calif., but I was only talking about N. Calif. A half a dozen was only a guess, and I suppose there are some that are hidden away that I don't know about.

Dick

If Darolds profile is correct it would place him in San Francisco. This one is further north of him.

Do you think the difficulty of the cross is due to less pollen? The inflorescence from this palm is a pain to extract pollen from. I tried the old rolling pin method the first time then screened it and did not get much pollen and only got 70 seeds to set. The second time around we used a different method and extracted a lot more pollen both the butia's are holding over 150 seed each. Hopefully the germination is not as disappointing as the seed output.

Maybe Patric will chime in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmGuyWC

I suspect the difficulty in the cross is not a lot of pollen, and maybe a lack of compatibility. Often times many seeds will set, but then only a small percentage will be viable seeds. Most will be dummys or blanks. Patrick tells me that the Parajubaea flowers don't mature at the same time, and that includes the female flowers.

Dick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ErikSJI

I suspect the difficulty in the cross is not a lot of pollen, and maybe a lack of compatibility. Often times many seeds will set, but then only a small percentage will be viable seeds. Most will be dummys or blanks. Patrick tells me that the Parajubaea flowers don't mature at the same time, and that includes the female flowers.

Dick

Would the Butia X Parajubaea germination times more follow the Butia or the Parajubaea? As I have hard that parajubaea takes quite awhile to germinate where as the Butia normally takes around 3 months.

I cracked open a couple seeds and all seems to be fine. Not that there are not some duds in there and some floaters but I did not want to waste any more to find out.

I have noticed that the Butia X Parajubaea seed is slightly larger then that of the Butia or butia x syagrus. When we soaked them they had a speckled look like a robbins egg but only visible when wet.

We had one rouge seed that was 3 times the size of any of the others.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ErikSJI

I am also curious as to the fruit on the Butia X parajubaea. Have you tasted it? Have you cracked open any of the seed to taste them?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmGuyWC

I am also curious as to the fruit on the Butia X parajubaea. Have you tasted it? Have you cracked open any of the seed to taste them?

Since the 2nd inflorescence on the B X P was only pollenated this week, it's way to early to tell if it was a take. The first inflorescence that was pollenated with Jubaea is hanging on to 17 seeds about 1/2 inch in diamater. If those seeds mature, I can assure you they will be planted, not tasted.

Dick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MARKGREYWA

G'Day Dick, First I want to apologise for my drunken misinterpretation of your latin post on the Parajubaea Cocoides site in Peru (it could be an old Inca village site] Hey we all know P Micro is more cold hardy. That would be my 2nd F..up on the Latin boys I remember the debate on Siesta F..,ing thney werten't to happy about and the origions of latin having to include Canada, and as you know you can't say cu...nt in Canada. Australa asians are sunk!! Sorry I wouldn't send my mule palm seeds but George Bush was such a hippocritical Fashist I couldn't risk the persecution. Regards . Mule palm inflorfrescence

post-5527-076487200 1311169291_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmGuyWC

G'Day Dick, First I want to apologise for my drunken misinterpretation of your latin post on the Parajubaea Cocoides site in Peru (it could be an old Inca village site] Hey we all know P Micro is more cold hardy. That would be my 2nd F..up on the Latin boys I remember the debate on Siesta F..,ing thney werten't to happy about and the origions of latin having to include Canada, and as you know you can't say cu...nt in Canada. Australa asians are sunk!! Sorry I wouldn't send my mule palm seeds but George Bush was such a hippocritical Fashist I couldn't risk the persecution. Regards . Mule palm inflorfrescence

Mark, I don't know what your talking about, but its not related to the subject of this thread. You have to be careful about making political statements on this forum. I would hate to lose this thread and some valueable information and photographs.

Dick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MARKGREYWA

Thanks Dick I won't but in again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brad Mondel

What an incredible palm! It resembles the coconut. I'm jealous -drools-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ErikSJI

I am also curious as to the fruit on the Butia X parajubaea. Have you tasted it? Have you cracked open any of the seed to taste them?

Since the 2nd inflorescence on the B X P was only pollenated this week, it's way to early to tell if it was a take. The first inflorescence that was pollenated with Jubaea is hanging on to 17 seeds about 1/2 inch in diamater. If those seeds mature, I can assure you they will be planted, not tasted.

Dick

Understandable. When Patric is done doing his magic on pollinating and you let one of the inflorescence go. Crack open one of those seeds and let me know if it tastes like a mini coconut.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ErikSJI

Dick if possible do you have photos of the Butia X Parajubaea as a seedling. It would be nice to see the different stages of this hybrid.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
krishnaraoji88

Dick if possible do you have photos of the Butia X Parajubaea as a seedling. It would be nice to see the different stages of this hybrid.

Here is a photo of mine as a seedling last year:

CIMG1024.jpg

Its grown since then but not nearly as fast as JxS

-Krishna

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
edbrown_III

Krish\\

Thanks for sharing you can see the Parajubea character real nicely in the photo---

It should be a good sucess.

Best regards

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ErikSJI

Dick if possible do you have photos of the Butia X Parajubaea as a seedling. It would be nice to see the different stages of this hybrid.

Here is a photo of mine as a seedling last year:

CIMG1024.jpg

Its grown since then but not nearly as fast as JxS

-Krishna

Thanks Krishna.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
krishnaraoji88

Krish\\

Thanks for sharing you can see the Parajubea character real nicely in the photo---

It should be a good sucess.

Best regards

Ed

This photo really captured the difference in color and leaf structure of this plant. I took photos of my JxS, BxJ, BxP, and BJxS at the same time while they are at the same ages and its interesting to note the differences between them. Its definitely a hybrid though considering the problems it gave me this winter (spear pull) but it has come back quite nicely this year. I havent been home in 2 months but it probably has grown a lot recently!

-Krishna

P.S. Just to make it clear this is a Butia odorata x Parajubaea cocoides to the best of my knowledge

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gallop

Here is one at a different stage. post-1473-058467400 1311277693_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ErikSJI

Here is one at a different stage. post-1473-058467400 1311277693_thumb.jpg

Thanks for posting Paul. How old is yours?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gallop

around 3 to 4yrs respectfully planted out as strap leaf

Here is one at a different stage. post-1473-058467400 1311277693_thumb.jpg

Thanks for posting Paul. How old is yours?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ErikSJI

around 3 to 4yrs respectfully planted out as strap leaf

Here is one at a different stage. post-1473-058467400 1311277693_thumb.jpg

Thanks for posting Paul. How old is yours?

Looks like pretty decent growth for a 4 yr old.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
krishnaraoji88

Nice one Paul! Is it just me or do all the Florida grown BxP lean towards their Butia heritage?

-Krishna

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ErikSJI

Nice one Paul! Is it just me or do all the Florida grown BxP lean towards their Butia heritage?

-Krishna

It does seem that way. It would be nice to see what has become of the others from the first batch that Dick got. If there were others for that matter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmGuyWC

It does seem that the first batch of B X P have more Parajubaea characteristics than some of the subsequent generations. The seeds came from a Butia that is no longer available to Patrick. I've lost the label, but if I remember correctly mine germinated in 2001. Mark Heath in Orlando has one of this batch and so does Alberto in Brazil. There are others, but I don't know who they are. I think Nigel had one of this batch too, and there may be some growing in Europe. There is a photo on page 2 of this thread of Mark's B X P.

Dick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ErikSJI

It does seem that the first batch of B X P have more Parajubaea characteristics than some of the subsequent generations. The seeds came from a Butia that is no longer available to Patrick. I've lost the label, but if I remember correctly mine germinated in 2001. Mark Heath in Orlando has one of this batch and so does Alberto in Brazil. There are others, but I don't know who they are. I think Nigel had one of this batch too, and there may be some growing in Europe. There is a photo on page 2 of this thread of Mark's B X P.

Dick

Not that Marks is not nice. It still is a great looking specimen. However yours seems to be a couple years ahead of him. You must be feeding your Butia X Parajubaea spinach at night. I wonder if the Florida heat is slowing his down slightly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JASON M

Because it's so cold in N. Calif. during winter not much grows except winter grasses and weeds.

Are you sure you want to say that?

You're pretty close to San Fransisco.

I'm pretty close to the Great Lakes.

<_<

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmGuyWC

My winters are chilly enough that there is hardly any palm growth for about 4.5 months starting the middle of November, but summers are very hot and we make up for the growth then. I have adobe clay, and the palms seem to love it, and I very rarely fertilize. My B X P seems to be more "streatched out" than Marks, but I think they were planted about the same time. Mine is planted in rich amended soil and gets sun early in the morning and then shade from the hot afternoon sun around 4 PM in the summer. My night time lows even in the summer are usually in the low 60's. It could be that Mark's is a little stressed out from his high night time temps. but it looks remarkabily nice considering it's half Parajubaea, and Parajubaeas don't like Florida.

Dick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
malcthomas

I'm sure there are many mature Parajubaeas in S. Calif., but I was only talking about N. Calif. A half a dozen was only a guess, and I suppose there are some that are hidden away that I don't know about.

Dick

The second time around we used a different method and extracted a lot more pollen

Erik...

Do you mind sharing this other method...I have tried to collect pollen for Nigel but have had hopeless results..

Further...can anyone identify the gaget in the photos?...I found it at the tip and after deseizing found it to make a great coquito nut cracker...

kind regards...

post-249-032485700 1311388888_thumb.jpg

post-249-032836000 1311388892_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ErikSJI

I'm sure there are many mature Parajubaeas in S. Calif., but I was only talking about N. Calif. A half a dozen was only a guess, and I suppose there are some that are hidden away that I don't know about.

Dick

The second time around we used a different method and extracted a lot more pollen

Erik...

Do you mind sharing this other method...I have tried to collect pollen for Nigel but have had hopeless results..

Further...can anyone identify the gaget in the photos?...I found it at the tip and after deseizing found it to make a great coquito nut cracker...

kind regards...

That item right there my friend is awesome. If you ever want to sell it let me know as I am tired of using other items to crack open seeds.

Please message me and I will let you know how we ship pollen and how we have been receiving pollen.

However just because you can ship pollen the way we do does not mean that everyone can make this pollen work. Anyone can ship pollen but what do they do with it when they get it at the other end? Timing, weather, location all play a part in it.

We have a different way of pollinating that allows us to do what others can not with minimal amounts of pollen. We are not using paint brushes, syringes, machines. Etc etc.

The two of us are on track to do 25,000 mule palm seedlings this year with this process. As well as many other hybrids thanks to all the pollen donors out there. In 3 years we have tripled output. This process takes all the guess work out of any hybrids that are done. When it is pollinated that is exactly what it is. No questions. I know there other pollinators out there that say NOT. However I can attest to it and so can our growers for over 10 years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmGuyWC

Here is an update on the progress of my Butia X Parajubaea. The first inflorescence that was pollenated with Jubaea has only held on to 6 fruit, but they are round plump and about an inch in diamater, and I think they are going to hold.

The second inflorescence was pollenated with its own pollen. Most of the flowers aborted within days, but it has held on to 7 fruit. They are still small, so they could also abort. The pollen appears to be almost sterile but there is some germ of life or they wouldn't have set any fruit.

My Bujubaea was pollenated with the Butia X Parajubaea and all the flowers aborted. There are 4 more spathes that have not opened yet. They will be pollenated with various pollens, including P. cocoides.

Dick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nigel

However just because you can ship pollen the way we do does not mean that everyone can make this pollen work. Anyone can ship pollen but what do they do with it when they get it at the other end? Timing, weather, location all play a part in it.

We have a different way of pollinating that allows us to do what others can not with minimal amounts of pollen. We are not using paint brushes, syringes, machines. Etc etc.

The two of us are on track to do 25,000 mule palm seedlings this year with this process. As well as many other hybrids thanks to all the pollen donors out there. In 3 years we have tripled output. This process takes all the guess work out of any hybrids that are done. When it is pollinated that is exactly what it is. No questions. I know there other pollinators out there that say NOT. However I can attest to it and so can our growers for over 10 years.

Thank you, now we all know how you feel about the other hybridisers. Your Butia xCoco clients can rest assured.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ErikSJI

However just because you can ship pollen the way we do does not mean that everyone can make this pollen work. Anyone can ship pollen but what do they do with it when they get it at the other end? Timing, weather, location all play a part in it.

We have a different way of pollinating that allows us to do what others can not with minimal amounts of pollen. We are not using paint brushes, syringes, machines. Etc etc.

The two of us are on track to do 25,000 mule palm seedlings this year with this process. As well as many other hybrids thanks to all the pollen donors out there. In 3 years we have tripled output. This process takes all the guess work out of any hybrids that are done. When it is pollinated that is exactly what it is. No questions. I know there other pollinators out there that say NOT. However I can attest to it and so can our growers for over 10 years.

Thank you, now we all know how you feel about the other hybridisers. Your Butia xCoco clients can rest assured.

Your welcome Nigel. Now I know how you feel as well. Wink wink. :mrlooney:

Maybe you can tell me how long Pollen stays viable even frozen dried etc. The longer you wait the less viable it becomes this is what I was getting at. Timing is very important. It has nothing to do about what I think of other hybridisers.I think what other Hybridisers are doing is great.

When Mark and his Mentor who wishes to remain unknown started making hybrids in the late 90s they were noticing some of there palms were not Mule Palms and they set out to find a way to change some of the processes to insure 100% accuracy. After they sold a whole field of Mule Palms to a guy in Texas who still has some mighty big Mule Palms with over 12ft of trunk for sale they started from scratch. They ditched the garbage bag method as they found it did more harm then good, they got rid of the paint brushes, qtips and the syringes as they found it was to time consuming. They got rid of the oven, the rolling pin. Etc. As they found that this process was not needed. Ever since that day they have never had another Butia pop up in the bunch.

Marks Mentor met with Dr. Wilcox years ago to discuss the Butia X Cocos cross. I believe he even went to the same college as Dr. Wilcox. Rest assured as you say. The old man has pulled off the Butia X Cocos twice now. Most of these were given away to other growers as gifts the rest have been planted just this year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mark Heath

However just because you can ship pollen the way we do does not mean that everyone can make this pollen work. Anyone can ship pollen but what do they do with it when they get it at the other end? Timing, weather, location all play a part in it.

We have a different way of pollinating that allows us to do what others can not with minimal amounts of pollen. We are not using paint brushes, syringes, machines. Etc etc.

The two of us are on track to do 25,000 mule palm seedlings this year with this process. As well as many other hybrids thanks to all the pollen donors out there. In 3 years we have tripled output. This process takes all the guess work out of any hybrids that are done. When it is pollinated that is exactly what it is. No questions. I know there other pollinators out there that say NOT. However I can attest to it and so can our growers for over 10 years.

Thank you, now we all know how you feel about the other hybridisers. Your Butia xCoco clients can rest assured.

Your welcome Nigel. Now I know how you feel as well. Wink wink. :mrlooney:

Maybe you can tell me how long Pollen stays viable even frozen dried etc. The longer you wait the less viable it becomes this is what I was getting at. Timing is very important. It has nothing to do about what I think of other hybridisers.I think what other Hybridisers are doing is great.

When Mark and his Mentor who wishes to remain unknown started making hybrids in the late 90s they were noticing some of there palms were not Mule Palms and they set out to find a way to change some of the processes to insure 100% accuracy. After they sold a whole field of Mule Palms to a guy in Texas who still has some mighty big Mule Palms with over 12ft of trunk for sale they started from scratch. They ditched the garbage bag method as they found it did more harm then good, they got rid of the paint brushes, qtips and the syringes as they found it was to time consuming. They got rid of the oven, the rolling pin. Etc. As they found that this process was not needed. Ever since that day they have never had another Butia pop up in the bunch.

Marks Mentor met with Dr. Wilcox years ago to discuss the Butia X Cocos cross. I believe he even went to the same college as Dr. Wilcox. Rest assured as you say. The old man has pulled off the Butia X Cocos twice now. Most of these were given away to other growers as gifts the rest have been planted just this year.

Erik,

When you talk about Mark Lynn, please put an "L" after his name so nobobdy confuses him w/ me. Seeing that i am an IPS member and have friends here, i don't want anybody to confuse me w/ someone who is not.

Please do this so there is no confusion.

Thanks,

Mark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ErikSJI

Sure thing Mark.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nigel

Maybe you can tell me how long Pollen stays viable even frozen dried etc. The longer you wait the less viable it becomes this is what I was getting at. Timing is very important. It has nothing to do about what I think of other hybridisers.I think what other Hybridisers are doing is great.

When Mark and his Mentor who wishes to remain unknown started making hybrids in the late 90s they were noticing some of there palms were not Mule Palms and they set out to find a way to change some of the processes to insure 100% accuracy. After they sold a whole field of Mule Palms to a guy in Texas who still has some mighty big Mule Palms with over 12ft of trunk for sale they started from scratch. They ditched the garbage bag method as they found it did more harm then good, they got rid of the paint brushes, qtips and the syringes as they found it was to time consuming. They got rid of the oven, the rolling pin. Etc. As they found that this process was not needed. Ever since that day they have never had another Butia pop up in the bunch.

Marks Mentor met with Dr. Wilcox years ago to discuss the Butia X Cocos cross. I believe he even went to the same college as Dr. Wilcox. Rest assured as you say. The old man has pulled off the Butia X Cocos twice now. Most of these were given away to other growers as gifts the rest have been planted just this year.

Erik this forum is about sharing not selling. You are very good at constantly promoting your palms and doubltless sell many through this forum.

OK, if you want to do that then thats your business, but please keep the remarks about other hybridisers out of your posts, thats all, thanks

Edited by Nigel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • RaleighNC
      By RaleighNC
      In April 2019 I posted photos of some of my plants.  After two growing seasons many of them have grown a lot.  I have tried to take the update photos from the same perspective, but often this was not possible.  I will post a few at a time.
      Trachycarpus nanus April 2019

       
      Nov 2020

       
      Cycas revoluta x taitungensis (April 1019)
       

      Nov 2020

    • GregVirginia7
      By GregVirginia7
      Update On the McCurtain...the leaf I thought might be a more mature frond is another two leaf strap...at 62, I need it to grow faster but I think I’ll chalk this one up as a lesson in patience. It’s not going to be what it’s not...but it’s a good candidate for my zone....

    • konarikcy
      By konarikcy
      Hello all
      For those of us who do not live in the States, the USDA Hardiness zone guidelines are a useful indication of what may grow in our country. I live in Nicosia Cyprus where we have relatively mild winters for most months - it is October and we are currently 36oC  with 20oC(night).  But it will suddenly change and by January, it will be continuous cold,  a little wet with possibly zero some nights which would normally I think put me on a 9b bordering 10a zone.
      However this can be misleading as I have found out the hard way. We have months and months of Mediterranean summer reaching 46oC this year (blame global warming). This means that the USDA zone alone is an insufficient guideline for us with more extreme weather as it does not take into account the max summer temperatures, the length of summer and winter conditions, rainfall etc.
      Nowadays, I often look at what other people are growing with similar climates nearest being  Southern California and even Sydney  (not in Cyprus as there are few of us pushing boundaries I think). Having recently joined this site, I look forward to following closely what people are growing in these areas. I currently grow Bungalow palms, livistona chinensis, bismarkia, robellina, trachycarpus fortunii and waggies, chaemadorea, and many cycas, dioone and encepalartus. Here is a picture of part of my garden.
      I would be interested in hearing how other people decide on what to try apart from the obvious desperate "must have this plant" garden urge.
    • GregVirginia7
      By GregVirginia7
      Any lessons on Sabal fronds collapsing? This one is growing in Bethany Beach, DE and has been in ground for about 4-years...seems very healthy...new growth fronds are huge...any advise appreciated...just want to rule in or out any nutritional deficiencies...they collapse at the petiole...most other fronds seem strong.
    • GregVirginia7
      By GregVirginia7
      Good morning folks...these updates will seem a bit boring but...
       
      That Sabal Minor seed I sprouted (first palm seed I’ve ever sproutEd) is getting a second strap leaf!

      and...my Brazoria is getting a trunk!...I think...
       

×
×
  • Create New...