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David N.TX.

Is anyone missing a Jubaea in California?

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David N.TX.

One of our local palmnuts noticed this new planting at the Dallas World Aquarium. Where could have they found such a palm? Also, it appears to be one of the bluish ones. What do you think?

DSCF0553.jpg

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carver

Wow! Must have been one huge flatbed, any clue how long ago was it planted?

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paulgila

most expensive christmas light-holder ever! :lol:

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sarasota alex

Great looking Jubaea! I wonder if someone would dare to plant an adult Jubaea of this size in Florida, maybe it would make it.

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DoomsDave

Whoa!

Hmm.

Come back when it's all lit up . . .

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calyptrocalyx&licuala freck

Now thats huge.. Any chance that someone

could take a pic at night... That would look Cool. :drool:

Cheers Mikey :)

Edited by calyptrocalyx&licuala freck

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PalmGuyWC

That has to be one of the tallest Jubaeas in the USA. It will be interesting to hear its history.

Dick

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mjff

I think Grant Stephenson at Horticultural Consultants in Houston was involved with that one and several others that were recently sent to Dallas from CA. Wish they hadn't planted it in such a small planter in a sea of concrete. I've seen many planted that way that declined I'm guessing because of the poor conditions for the roots.

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palmaddict

Palmtalk,

I know where it came from and I even have the story. It comes from Auburn, California which is about 40 miles east of Sacramento in the Sierra foothills. The elevation is about 1,540 feet in elevation and with cold storms maybe six inches of snow can accumulate. Lows can be in the low to mid 20's and the record low for the town is 16 degrees. IT IS ESTIMATED THAT THE PALM WAS PLANTED IN THE EARLY PART OF THE 20th CENTURY. Here is the story and thank GOD the tree trimmer knew that it was special:

http://auburnjournal.com/detail/131589.html

Patrick

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Matt N- Dallas

What a cool story! It is planted in one of the highest profile locations in Dallas in the middle of downtown. I hope my six jubaeas grow to that height someday (long after i'm dead!) I've planted the green and silver forms.

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Mats

$7500 for a 30' Jubaea chilensis? That palm broker got a steal.

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AggiePalms

Why didn't we have palms like that in Dallas when I was growing up? Stupendous, I've never seen one anywhere near that tall!

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mjff

Palmtalk,

I know where it came from and I even have the story. It comes from Auburn, California which is about 40 miles east of Sacramento in the Sierra foothills. The elevation is about 1,540 feet in elevation and with cold storms maybe six inches of snow can accumulate. Lows can be in the low to mid 20's and the record low for the town is 16 degrees. IT IS ESTIMATED THAT THE PALM WAS PLANTED IN THE EARLY PART OF THE 20th CENTURY. Here is the story and thank GOD the tree trimmer knew that it was special:

http://auburnjournal.com/detail/131589.html

Patrick

Sounds like a different palm from the ones Grant told me he was bringing in. Now that I think about it I think the ones he sent went to the zoo or botanical gardens. Maybe both? So there should be several more large Jubaeas around Dallas.

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mjff

$7500 for a 30' Jubaea chilensis? That palm broker got a steal.

People always seem to confuse the "wholesale" price for one of these palms with the "retail" price. I've bought 7 of these with 6' to 20' of trunk, and never paid the owner more than $2,500 for the tree. By the time you add in the cost of cranes, permits, digging, prepping for shipment, permits, freight, etc. that's where the real money starts adding up. Then there is the profit for the nursery or broker if you aren't buying it direct. If you're trying to sell one in the ground at your house for $1,000/ft good luck. That is the price planted in the buyer's yard, and the money it takes to successfully get it from seller to buyer is a lot more than you think until you do it a time or two (or 7).

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BS Man about Palms

So when I sold my CIDP for $2,000 I did good? :D

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mjff

So when I sold my CIDP for $2,000 I did good? :D

Don't recall how big your CIDP was, but for a specimen with many feet of trunk that would be about right.

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Jim in Los Altos

Palmtalk,

I know where it came from and I even have the story. It comes from Auburn, California which is about 40 miles east of Sacramento in the Sierra foothills. The elevation is about 1,540 feet in elevation and with cold storms maybe six inches of snow can accumulate. Lows can be in the low to mid 20's and the record low for the town is 16 degrees. IT IS ESTIMATED THAT THE PALM WAS PLANTED IN THE EARLY PART OF THE 20th CENTURY. Here is the story and thank GOD the tree trimmer knew that it was special:

http://auburnjournal.com/detail/131589.html

Patrick

I know of the one in that story that came from Mountain View (this city is adjacent to Los Altos). I was shocked when I drove down Barbara Ave. one day and saw that the palm was missing! I'm sooooo glad it wasn't cut down and ended up in Dallas with the other big Chilean pictured. The one in Mountain View was gigantic and had the more upright frond arrangement.

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MattyB

I hope it doesn't collapse like Martin's did. Martin, did you see the way they're slinging it up by only that one piece of webbing? They better keep an eye on it, especially since there's gonna be people walking under it. :unsure:

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mjff

I hope it doesn't collapse like Martin's did. Martin, did you see the way they're slinging it up by only that one piece of webbing? They better keep an eye on it, especially since there's gonna be people walking under it. :unsure:

The damage on mine was actually where the blocks were placed under the trunk on the truck. Hope they used some supports that spread the weight out over a large area instead of concentrating it in one spot which can cause a bruise. I'm not crazy about the spot they planted it in either. They need to tear out a bunch of that concrete.

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Kumar

Very small rootball for such a large palm

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Jimhardy

"San Diego’s Sunset Palms used a crane to lift it up and put it on a flatbed for the 3,000-mile trip to the Lone Star State."

3000 miles? I guess they got lost on the way :mrlooney:

I hope it can take the cold in Dallas :hmm:

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daxin

Palmtalk,

I know where it came from and I even have the story. It comes from Auburn, California which is about 40 miles east of Sacramento in the Sierra foothills. The elevation is about 1,540 feet in elevation and with cold storms maybe six inches of snow can accumulate. Lows can be in the low to mid 20's and the record low for the town is 16 degrees. IT IS ESTIMATED THAT THE PALM WAS PLANTED IN THE EARLY PART OF THE 20th CENTURY. Here is the story and thank GOD the tree trimmer knew that it was special:

http://auburnjournal.com/detail/131589.html

Patrick

I know of the one in that story that came from Mountain View (this city is adjacent to Los Altos). I was shocked when I drove down Barbara Ave. one day and saw that the palm was missing! I'm sooooo glad it wasn't cut down and ended up in Dallas with the other big Chilean pictured. The one in Mountain View was gigantic and had the more upright frond arrangement.

I wish I had seen my local mature Jubaea! Here is a glimpse from Google Map:

post-608-086953900 1291835882_thumb.jpg

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Mats

People always seem to confuse the "wholesale" price for one of these palms with the "retail" price. I've bought 7 of these with 6' to 20' of trunk, and never paid the owner more than $2,500 for the tree. By the time you add in the cost of cranes, permits, digging, prepping for shipment, permits, freight, etc. that's where the real money starts adding up.

Point taken and I do appreciate all the additional costs involved.

But 4 years ago I sold a 15' (trunk) CIDP for $3,000 so from my perspective you did very well to get a 20' Jubaea for $2,500.

Especially when you consider how commonplace large CIDPs are compared to large Jubaeas.

"San Diego’s Sunset Palms used a crane to lift it up and put it on a flatbed for the 3,000-mile trip to the Lone Star State."

3000 miles? I guess they got lost on the way

Check out these reviews for 'Sunset Palms and Landscape'.

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TonyDFW

Here is a night image of the Dallas Jubea

post-356-080676600 1291859465_thumb.jpg

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carver

Nice! That should help with some of the cold nights.

Here is a night image of the Dallas Jubea

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Perito

Here is a night image of the Dallas Jubea

Is that stop sign in a swoon!?

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mjff

Here is a night image of the Dallas Jubea

I hope my kid doesn't see that or I'll have two just like it in my front yard and a big Brahea armata to match. :hmm:

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JEFF IN MODESTO

Something tells me that beautiful palm is gonna end up frozen.

Auburn's winter record lows are much warmer than Dallas.

Oranges grows in Auburn.... dont think they do well in Dallas?

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mjff

Something tells me that beautiful palm is gonna end up frozen.

Auburn's winter record lows are much warmer than Dallas.

Oranges grows in Auburn.... dont think they do well in Dallas?

Jubaeas are growing in a lot colder places than Dallas. I've heard of them surviving below 0F, and I know for a fact they will take 12F with no damage whatsoever, at least mine have. There are a couple that survived in El Paso through many single digit lows with no damage as far as I can tell.

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TonyDFW

I've been growing a Jubea from seedling for over 14 years and it hasn't been damaged. Note>>> the past 20 years in Dallas has been very mild.

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tikitiki

They have some huge Attaleas inside the aquarium. Someone local should go in and take a pick of those. Yes they are inside. I was there a few years ago and they were to the roof .

Tom

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Jim in Los Altos

Palmtalk,

I know where it came from and I even have the story. It comes from Auburn, California which is about 40 miles east of Sacramento in the Sierra foothills. The elevation is about 1,540 feet in elevation and with cold storms maybe six inches of snow can accumulate. Lows can be in the low to mid 20's and the record low for the town is 16 degrees. IT IS ESTIMATED THAT THE PALM WAS PLANTED IN THE EARLY PART OF THE 20th CENTURY. Here is the story and thank GOD the tree trimmer knew that it was special:

http://auburnjournal.com/detail/131589.html

Patrick

I know of the one in that story that came from Mountain View (this city is adjacent to Los Altos). I was shocked when I drove down Barbara Ave. one day and saw that the palm was missing! I'm sooooo glad it wasn't cut down and ended up in Dallas with the other big Chilean pictured. The one in Mountain View was gigantic and had the more upright frond arrangement.

I wish I had seen my local mature Jubaea! Here is a glimpse from Google Map:

post-608-086953900 1291835882_thumb.jpg

Yeah, Daxin. That's the one I would drive by periodically. Whenever I was driving down Miramonte Ave. I'd turn down Barbara St. to see this mammoth palm. I miss it and hope it survives its move.

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The Germinator

Did they plant some Euro-Trash at the bottom? There is not much room in that planter. :unsure:

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LJG

People always seem to confuse the "wholesale" price for one of these palms with the "retail" price. I've bought 7 of these with 6' to 20' of trunk, and never paid the owner more than $2,500 for the tree. By the time you add in the cost of cranes, permits, digging, prepping for shipment, permits, freight, etc. that's where the real money starts adding up.

Point taken and I do appreciate all the additional costs involved.

But 4 years ago I sold a 15' (trunk) CIDP for $3,000 so from my perspective you did very well to get a 20' Jubaea for $2,500.

Especially when you consider how commonplace large CIDPs are compared to large Jubaeas.

Well, I do believe Martin leaves out a little of the back story on how he got those prices on a few of his palms and what he felt the value was worth only a short time later before they were even moved. It is all relative.

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mjff

People always seem to confuse the "wholesale" price for one of these palms with the "retail" price. I've bought 7 of these with 6' to 20' of trunk, and never paid the owner more than $2,500 for the tree. By the time you add in the cost of cranes, permits, digging, prepping for shipment, permits, freight, etc. that's where the real money starts adding up.

Point taken and I do appreciate all the additional costs involved.

But 4 years ago I sold a 15' (trunk) CIDP for $3,000 so from my perspective you did very well to get a 20' Jubaea for $2,500.

Especially when you consider how commonplace large CIDPs are compared to large Jubaeas.

Well, I do believe Martin leaves out a little of the back story on how he got those prices on a few of his palms and what he felt the value was worth only a short time later before they were even moved. It is all relative.

I offered the owners of the trees what the tree brokers I talked to in S CA told me they would pay a homeowner for trees like the ones I was buying. The owners were happy with it, and now the trees are in my yard. At the end of the day they are worth what a willing buyer will pay and a willing seller will take. The tree in this thread is quite a bit larger and nicer than any of mine, so $7,500.00 wasn't a bad price for either party IMO. The story notes they tried to sell it themselves for much more, but had no takers. Now maybe if they had offered it at that price planted in somebody's yard, but then they still probably would have netted around $7,500.00 depending on the difficulty involved with moving it.

I looked at buying another tree in N CA and the cost to move it was prohibitive because even though it was right next to the street it was sitting on top of the water, electric and sewer lines for the house, and moving the tree required cutting/repairing all of them. If I recall correctly, the cost to get it loaded on a truck and repair the yard was over $15,000.00, and by the time it was planted in my yard the costs were up to $1,500/ft not including the tree!

Not sure what you are referring to when you say, "what he felt the value was worth only a short time later before they were even moved." I may have jokingly offered to sell them for a much higher price on this forum, but I was only joking if that is what you are talking about.

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Mats
Not sure what you are referring to when you say, "what he felt the value was worth only a short time later before they were even moved."

Well, you did say, "Barring some unforeseen expense, the cost for the first two planted in my yard will be under $400.00 per foot of trunk. Considering that I was figuring $1,000.00 per foot just for the plants..."

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mjff

Not sure what you are referring to when you say, "what he felt the value was worth only a short time later before they were even moved."

Well, you did say, "Barring some unforeseen expense, the cost for the first two planted in my yard will be under $400.00 per foot of trunk. Considering that I was figuring $1,000.00 per foot just for the plants..."

I interpreted Len's statement to mean that I was trying to sell them for a lot more before I even moved them.

I was figuring $1,000.00/ft for the trees based on what I was being told on this forum before I actually found some and talked to some guys who buy/move them, which is why I try to set the record straight when I see somebody post that kind of price for just the tree. If the tree is already in a box at a nursery fully recovered from the transplant, then it's going to set you back $1000/ft (probably more if it is a smaller tree because it costs just as much to move it, but there are fewer feet of trunk to spread the cost out over), but if you are trying to sell a tree from your yard with the buyer handling the move, don't count on it.

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LJG

Martin, I am referring to the offer you made Ashton after he assisted you in your endeavor. I think the point here is you got a deal and your deal came with some help. After all you are in TX and never made it out to see any of the plants moved and would have never found them all either. I think you know this becuase from what I know, you were serious about the price you wanted after you had ownership. In the end you got a great deal and I doubt you will see someone do it again when all totaled.

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mjff

Martin, I am referring to the offer you made Ashton after he assisted you in your endeavor. I think the point here is you got a deal and your deal came with some help. After all you are in TX and never made it out to see any of the plants moved and would have never found them all either. I think you know this becuase from what I know, you were serious about the price you wanted after you had ownership. In the end you got a great deal and I doubt you will see someone do it again when all totaled.

Len, I never made Ashton an offer, and never tried to sell any of the 7 trees I bought to anyone else for any price? It was Danny that helped me, and he told Ashton about those trees before he told me, but Ashton wasn't interested because they are the strict form. If I recall correctly it was Ashton that took the photos that Danny sent me. If Ashton wanted them he could have bought them directly from the homeowner before or after I found out about them.

I've certainly never tried to conceal that I got help or who it was that helped. All the details were posted on PalmTalk.

After the 2 trees Danny told me about I purchased 5 more. So you have the 7 trees I bought which averaged out to about $218.75/ft for the trees themselves, and this one that appears to have about 35' of trunk that sold for $7,500.00 ($214.29/ft). That's 8 trees that all sold for about the same price per foot in 4 separate transactions that indicate the going price a homeowner can expect to get for a large Jubaea is around $215/ft. If these were houses, I'd wish you luck selling one for $1,000/sq ft when all the available comps indicate a market value of $215/sq ft. Sure you could sit back potentially for years until the right sucker came along with more money than brains, but if you want to sell without an extended marketing time...

Anyway, it appears the aquarium's tree broker got about the same deal I did on my trees when you adjust for the size difference, better when you consider the quality of the tree (nicer trunk, more desirable pendulous head), so it appears we've just seen somebody else do exactly what I did, and the other tree brokers out there do the same thing all the time. Unless they've increased what they are offering pretty dramatically, they aren't paying homeowners anywhere near $1,000/ft.

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