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MattyB

Manambe Lavaka

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freakypalmguy

Looking very nice mister, all your hard work is really paying off.

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Hilo Jason

Looks incredible Matt! Nice job on all of that!

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Mark_NoVA

Wow, great-looking big garden! That's amazing you only started 3 years ago, and with that steep working area to boot. Guess you don't need a gym membership. :)

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BS Man about Palms

Matty!

You're an animal! Everything looks dynamite. It is so awesome that you're able to pull of pritchardia, hyophorbe(s), and carpoxylon, so unbelievable! Not to mention, your "version" of Prestonia! Why stop there?

Why not go corphya, dictyocaryum, and cryo renda? You might be just the one in ca to do it! Love the royals, chambos, and the complementing plants as well. Looking clean Matty!

-eric

If Matt was able to start with some 2 gal sized ones of those, I'd go even money on 2 of those 3...

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Jeff Searle

nice

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PalmatierMeg

Matt, your place looks fantastic. I'm amazed at the species of palms you grow and I've learned a lot. I never knew there were different varieties of Dypsis pembana and lanceolata. You'll have another Garden of Eden someday.

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dalmatiansoap

10-29-10-024.jpg

This is 'Blue Java' or 'Ice Cream' and the fruit is much larger and less plentiful.

This is Musa Orinoco.

:greenthumb:

All that beautifull plants arround!!!

I can only say WOW :yay:

Edited by dalmatiansoap

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MattyB

Musa orinoco huh? No wonder the first fruit I had off of it was not very tastey. I bought it as Musa blue java/ice cream. Maybe I got took. Oh well, the Musa mona lisa is very good so I'll just let that take over.

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ariscott

If it is Java blue, it should be very tasty.... I have been trying to find that here in Darwin. Being a banana, it is very hard trying to find if in different state!!!

Regards, Ari :)

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sonoranfans

Amazing garden matty, that place looks like a real labor of love and will just get better and better with time...

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John Case

Musa orinoco huh? No wonder the first fruit I had off of it was not very tastey. I bought it as Musa blue java/ice cream. Maybe I got took. Oh well, the Musa mona lisa is very good so I'll just let that take over.

Matt,

The fruit doesn't look right for Blue Java. Too big and the color is not right. If it did not have a hint of vanilla, it is definitely not 'Ice Cream'. I can grow them here and they bear heavily once they fruit.

Orinoco is probably correct.

Thanks,

JC

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osideterry

Matty - 4 years ago I planted the following Musa acuminata/dessert quality bananas: Orinoco, Manzano, Raja Puri, Java Blue/Ice Cream, and Brazilian (aka dwarf manzano).

I think my heat is similar to yours, and I could get all of the above to flower and produce fruit. I could only get one of these to produce fruit and ripen early enough to enjoy the fruit, and that is the Brazillian. This year I had a nice bunch of them in May and another bunch in September. I had 2 harvests last year also. No comparison with the others.

I dug out all but the Brazilian this year, because they just weren't worth all the mess of tending to. If you want a Brazil Pup let me know.

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MattyB

Thanks for the offer Terry. I think I'm gonna let the Mona Lisa take over. It has tons of small super tastey fruit.

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sur4z

10-30-10-040.jpg

The Orchard with more fruit trees

As all have said great job! I detect in this photo two stumps...did you cut the trees for more sun light for the orchard? Some kind of oak?

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MattyB

Those logs are from a Grevilia robusta that I cut down last year. Check out the first Royals in the rainforest area. Crazy!

post-126-089094400 1288898781_thumb.jpg

post-126-001333000 1288898860_thumb.jpg

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Walter John

Those logs are from a Grevilia robusta that I cut down last year. Check out the first Royals in the rainforest area. Crazy!

Did you kill that King Cobra next to the robusta ? man, what a monster.

Seriously great before shot,was that 2005 ?

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MattyB

hahaha King Cobra! That was a Bauhinia forficata that I had to do some corrective pruning to get it to behave. It's since been cut down.

That pic was from October 2007.

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Gileno Machado

Nice job MattyB, what a big difference taking place at the Dictionary hill...

Barbara saw your pictures with me and now she wants to find and plant some Ficus dammaropsis too...not to mention the "frog"...well, why don`t you show us just the palms, hummm? Congrats...

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GTClover

Wow, just Wow!

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Dave-Vero

I spotted a mature Grevillea robusta in town and was surprised--silky oaks were kind of a short-lived fashion. This one put up with a cat-3 (probably) hurricane.

The place is really coming along, almost Florida-fast.

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Mandrew968

I've been meaning to take some progress pics of the garden and finally got started doing so this evening. I'll take and post some more this weekend but I can't wait to get started posting now!

10-29-10-002.jpg

The front entry planter with Hyophorbe vershafeltii and Dypsis heteromorpha.

10-29-10-001.jpg

Dispite being cold sensitive and getting spotty leaves, these Hyophorbe are getting fat!

10-29-10-003.jpg

The triangle palms out front by the driveway are really shaping up nicely. The one on the left was blown over completely last Winter. I did not upright it, it did it by itself. The 7 small palms speckled in between the triangles are Brahea decumbens.

10-29-10-005.jpg

From near to far: Copernicia cerifera, Copernicia alba, Bismarckia nobilis, and background stuff.

Looks like you have to water everyday--actually looks like you are trying your best to keep it from looking like the chaparral so cal really is; can you guys have wells dug? cuz I'd hate to have your water bill, otherwise! nice palms :)

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MattyB

Hi Mandrew,

I water once a week when it's warm, less when it's cool. During the hottest Summer months of July, August, September I water twice a week only in the rainforest. Everything else stays on once a week. Everything is watered by drip irrigation and is heavily mulched. My water bill is the same as my parents who live on a small city lot and have a front lawn and back lawn. I cannot aford to be wasteful with water and I'm surprised at how well everything has responded to the drip irrigation.

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Shon

Remembering how it all started till now,wow! I remember the "How long will it take Matty to move all the soil thread".Nice job Matty can't wait for the update this Spring.

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R.E.Var Kotobuki

Ayo Matty!

I need to come out and visit you. nuff said biggrin.gif.

Danny

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Bill Austin

Matt, I think everything that can be said about your garden has been said already . SOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO keep it growing :greenthumb:

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BermudaPalm

Jaw dropping stuff Matt. I love the "general shot.." looks very tropical.

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Al in Kona

I've been meaning to take some progress pics of the garden and finally got started doing so this evening. I'll take and post some more this weekend but I can't wait to get started posting now!

10-29-10-002.jpg

The front entry planter with Hyophorbe vershafeltii and Dypsis heteromorpha.

10-29-10-001.jpg

Dispite being cold sensitive and getting spotty leaves, these Hyophorbe are getting fat!

10-29-10-003.jpg

The triangle palms out front by the driveway are really shaping up nicely. The one on the left was blown over completely last Winter. I did not upright it, it did it by itself. The 7 small palms speckled in between the triangles are Brahea decumbens.

10-29-10-005.jpg

From near to far: Copernicia cerifera, Copernicia alba, Bismarckia nobilis, and background stuff.

You have a great garden started taking advantage of your sloping property. A lot of planning followed by hard work has definately paid off and just wait a few more years and you will be approaching a 'Velezilization' look in places of your palm garden!

I like your corner planting of Dypsis decaryi and the 7-Brahea decumbens. Given time those B. decumbens will be choice landscape plants and should do well in your climate provided they don't get overly shaded by the Triangles. One of these days I hope to see it all in person.

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Sabal Steve

10-29-10-009.jpg

Now onto the side yard. The front planter from left to right whether you can see them or not: Pritchardia pacifica, Archontophoenix maxima, Dypsis heteromorpha, Variegated Manihot shrub, Dypsis sp. 'clumping ambo', Archontophoenix sp., Pritchardia thurstonii.

10-29-10-010.jpg

Kentopsis oliviformis with several rings of trunk now.

10-29-10-011.jpg

Hyophorbe lagenicaulis bottling it up.

10-29-10-019.jpg

Kentiopsis from other angle with Chambeyronia hookeri next to it.

How is the P. Pacifica doing?

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Sabal Steve

10-29-10-021.jpg

Moving down the hill we go under the Jacaranda; a nice microclimate with filtered light.

L to R. Pinanga caesia, Satakentia likuiensis, Ptychosperma caryotoides, with a bunch of Ti plants speckled around.

10-29-10-022.jpg

Satakentia likuiensis puts out about 2-1/2 leaves per year.

10-29-10-023.jpg

We have a few very productive banana trees that are watered by our washer's grey water. This is 'Mona Lisa', the fruit is very small, very fruity and delicious, and there's upwards of 90 on each stalk.

10-29-10-024.jpg

This is 'Blue Java' or 'Ice Cream' and the fruit is much larger and less plentiful.

Satakentia likuiensis are incredible palms too. Are those surviving the frosts as well?

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Sabal Steve

Thanks everyone for all the kind words. I'll try and answer some questions that were posed:

Lee,

I started planting at the end of '07, Oct., Nov. Dec, were when the first plants went in. I usually plant things out at about a 5 gallon size plant. With the rocky substrate I usually can't dig a very big/deep hole. I put metal wire around everything to protect from gophers and rabbits, and when they get a little larger I cut the above ground portion off because rabbits are no longer a threat to the larger branches. The plastic wire you're seeing is probably my shade cloth to help things get acclimated while the canopy fills in.

Bill,

I had my dogs dig holes at the base of the Bottle Palm and the Carpoxylon. Luckily they've continued to grow with no problems.

Mike,

The Pinanga caesia has not seen Winter yet and I assume it will die. It was gifted to Paul from Jack Sayers but Paul didn't have the heart to kill it and gave it to me to do the honors. Post 1 photo 4, you're seeing a carport at the top of the hill.

Ari,

I'm removing the Paulownia because they are decidious and the cycles of them leafing out and dropping leaves messes with the acclimation of all the palms. I need everygreen canopy on this side of the rainforest which is why I've planted a couple of Royal Palms under the Paulownias to take over. From what little I know about bamboo, we can grow a lot of Dendrocalamus. They're very fast growers apparently.

David S.,

I have drip irrigation done to the side yard, the rainforest, the orchard, the purple gardens, and the bamboo. Everything else in the canyon and on the rocky ridge gets hand watered. The drip irrigation is really the secret to growing healthy trees here in SoCal, in my opinion. It's a little harder to get them established and they often need some supplimental hand watering when young, but once you force the roots to go down to get the water, they love it and are very resilient to the sun and santa ana winds.

Keith,

I think the apple I pictured is Golden Dorsett. I have an Anna also. They grow very well and fruit several times per year no matter how warm the weather is. The fruit and flower nonstop.

I'm assuming that you have clay soil, how does your drip irrigation work with that? Last question.

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KennyRE317

Thanks everyone for all the kind words. I'll try and answer some questions that were posed:

Lee,

I started planting at the end of '07, Oct., Nov. Dec, were when the first plants went in. I usually plant things out at about a 5 gallon size plant. With the rocky substrate I usually can't dig a very big/deep hole. I put metal wire around everything to protect from gophers and rabbits, and when they get a little larger I cut the above ground portion off because rabbits are no longer a threat to the larger branches. The plastic wire you're seeing is probably my shade cloth to help things get acclimated while the canopy fills in.

Bill,

I had my dogs dig holes at the base of the Bottle Palm and the Carpoxylon. Luckily they've continued to grow with no problems.

Mike,

The Pinanga caesia has not seen Winter yet and I assume it will die. It was gifted to Paul from Jack Sayers but Paul didn't have the heart to kill it and gave it to me to do the honors. Post 1 photo 4, you're seeing a carport at the top of the hill.

Ari,

I'm removing the Paulownia because they are decidious and the cycles of them leafing out and dropping leaves messes with the acclimation of all the palms. I need everygreen canopy on this side of the rainforest which is why I've planted a couple of Royal Palms under the Paulownias to take over. From what little I know about bamboo, we can grow a lot of Dendrocalamus. They're very fast growers apparently.

David S.,

I have drip irrigation done to the side yard, the rainforest, the orchard, the purple gardens, and the bamboo. Everything else in the canyon and on the rocky ridge gets hand watered. The drip irrigation is really the secret to growing healthy trees here in SoCal, in my opinion. It's a little harder to get them established and they often need some supplimental hand watering when young, but once you force the roots to go down to get the water, they love it and are very resilient to the sun and santa ana winds.

Keith,

I think the apple I pictured is Golden Dorsett. I have an Anna also. They grow very well and fruit several times per year no matter how warm the weather is. The fruit and flower nonstop.

I'm assuming that you have clay soil, how does your drip irrigation work with that? Last question.

I got my 1/2" irrigation line all installed and tested some 1/4" tubes with drippers and drip is the way to go for clay. I had used my clay to make tall swales and flooded them and since I got the drip in I took the swales apart since you can easily swap drippers so that it'll absorb faster than it drips. I ran my system for an hour and a half and there was no water runoff. Matty gave me a lot of good advice on setting everything up and I think it'll definitely pay off. I was going to bump my thread from a month or 2 back when I was looking into drip with a lot of things I learned

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Zeeth

I think an update is in order!

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Sabal Steve

Thanks everyone for all the kind words. I'll try and answer some questions that were posed:

Lee,

I started planting at the end of '07, Oct., Nov. Dec, were when the first plants went in. I usually plant things out at about a 5 gallon size plant. With the rocky substrate I usually can't dig a very big/deep hole. I put metal wire around everything to protect from gophers and rabbits, and when they get a little larger I cut the above ground portion off because rabbits are no longer a threat to the larger branches. The plastic wire you're seeing is probably my shade cloth to help things get acclimated while the canopy fills in.

Bill,

I had my dogs dig holes at the base of the Bottle Palm and the Carpoxylon. Luckily they've continued to grow with no problems.

Mike,

The Pinanga caesia has not seen Winter yet and I assume it will die. It was gifted to Paul from Jack Sayers but Paul didn't have the heart to kill it and gave it to me to do the honors. Post 1 photo 4, you're seeing a carport at the top of the hill.

Ari,

I'm removing the Paulownia because they are decidious and the cycles of them leafing out and dropping leaves messes with the acclimation of all the palms. I need everygreen canopy on this side of the rainforest which is why I've planted a couple of Royal Palms under the Paulownias to take over. From what little I know about bamboo, we can grow a lot of Dendrocalamus. They're very fast growers apparently.

David S.,

I have drip irrigation done to the side yard, the rainforest, the orchard, the purple gardens, and the bamboo. Everything else in the canyon and on the rocky ridge gets hand watered. The drip irrigation is really the secret to growing healthy trees here in SoCal, in my opinion. It's a little harder to get them established and they often need some supplimental hand watering when young, but once you force the roots to go down to get the water, they love it and are very resilient to the sun and santa ana winds.

Keith,

I think the apple I pictured is Golden Dorsett. I have an Anna also. They grow very well and fruit several times per year no matter how warm the weather is. The fruit and flower nonstop.

I'm assuming that you have clay soil, how does your drip irrigation work with that? Last question.

I got my 1/2" irrigation line all installed and tested some 1/4" tubes with drippers and drip is the way to go for clay. I had used my clay to make tall swales and flooded them and since I got the drip in I took the swales apart since you can easily swap drippers so that it'll absorb faster than it drips. I ran my system for an hour and a half and there was no water runoff. Matty gave me a lot of good advice on setting everything up and I think it'll definitely pay off. I was going to bump my thread from a month or 2 back when I was looking into drip with a lot of things I learned

I'm on the fence about drip irrigation. I have a small yard and it doesn't take long to water everything, but drip would be more efficient and make things look nicer. Irrigation would be another expense. Anyone have any idea what it would to take to water a 0.05 acre lot? Nothing too water hungry. So far, there are 5 larger palms in the ground.

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KennyRE317

Thanks everyone for all the kind words. I'll try and answer some questions that were posed:

Lee,

I started planting at the end of '07, Oct., Nov. Dec, were when the first plants went in. I usually plant things out at about a 5 gallon size plant. With the rocky substrate I usually can't dig a very big/deep hole. I put metal wire around everything to protect from gophers and rabbits, and when they get a little larger I cut the above ground portion off because rabbits are no longer a threat to the larger branches. The plastic wire you're seeing is probably my shade cloth to help things get acclimated while the canopy fills in.

Bill,

I had my dogs dig holes at the base of the Bottle Palm and the Carpoxylon. Luckily they've continued to grow with no problems.

Mike,

The Pinanga caesia has not seen Winter yet and I assume it will die. It was gifted to Paul from Jack Sayers but Paul didn't have the heart to kill it and gave it to me to do the honors. Post 1 photo 4, you're seeing a carport at the top of the hill.

Ari,

I'm removing the Paulownia because they are decidious and the cycles of them leafing out and dropping leaves messes with the acclimation of all the palms. I need everygreen canopy on this side of the rainforest which is why I've planted a couple of Royal Palms under the Paulownias to take over. From what little I know about bamboo, we can grow a lot of Dendrocalamus. They're very fast growers apparently.

David S.,

I have drip irrigation done to the side yard, the rainforest, the orchard, the purple gardens, and the bamboo. Everything else in the canyon and on the rocky ridge gets hand watered. The drip irrigation is really the secret to growing healthy trees here in SoCal, in my opinion. It's a little harder to get them established and they often need some supplimental hand watering when young, but once you force the roots to go down to get the water, they love it and are very resilient to the sun and santa ana winds.

Keith,

I think the apple I pictured is Golden Dorsett. I have an Anna also. They grow very well and fruit several times per year no matter how warm the weather is. The fruit and flower nonstop.

I'm assuming that you have clay soil, how does your drip irrigation work with that? Last question.

I got my 1/2" irrigation line all installed and tested some 1/4" tubes with drippers and drip is the way to go for clay. I had used my clay to make tall swales and flooded them and since I got the drip in I took the swales apart since you can easily swap drippers so that it'll absorb faster than it drips. I ran my system for an hour and a half and there was no water runoff. Matty gave me a lot of good advice on setting everything up and I think it'll definitely pay off. I was going to bump my thread from a month or 2 back when I was looking into drip with a lot of things I learned

I'm on the fence about drip irrigation. I have a small yard and it doesn't take long to water everything, but drip would be more efficient and make things look nicer. Irrigation would be another expense. Anyone have any idea what it would to take to water a 0.05 acre lot? Nothing too water hungry. So far, there are 5 larger palms in the ground.

I have a pretty small lot as well but not .05 small, I think it's more around .15 acre, about 6500sqft. when I didn't have my yard done and it was just a small front lawn it wasn't that bad since it's kind of enjoyable to spend 15minutes twice a week to water your plants, but as soon as I got everything done I knew the 15minutes twice a week would end up being about 2 hours and 2 times a week. right now just watering my container ranch by hand it takes me a bit over an hour each time. since I knew how much yard space I would need to water I just ran regular 3/4" pvc throughout the entire property during the summer and just recently converted 4 of the 6 zones into drip zones.

if you have PVC underground already it's not that expensive to convert to drip, the breakdown is roughly

$15 for filter and pressure reducer per zone (per valve)

$5 to convert each sprinkler head to drip ... one elbow thread adapter and one thread to drip converter

5cents a foot for 1/2" poly line

2 cents a foot for 1/4" poly line

random drippers are about $5 for 25

from what I gather 5 large palms would probably be 4-6 gallons of water per watering session so 3x 1gallon per hour, and if you feel like your plant needs more water you can change one or 2 of them out for 2gph drippers. the best thing about doing drip is that there's no more need for swales and all the water that's being used to water the plants actually goes to the plant without any runoff

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MattyB

Wow, things have really changed since this thread 3 years ago. I've done pictorials and videos since, but it's probably time for another update. I've been trying to get my wife to come out with me while I take pics so that we can get some scale in there. I'll try and answer all your questions.

The Pritchardia pacifica and P. thurstonii survived a couple of years in my upper garden, but as the leaves got bigger the cold damage just made them look too ratty, so I just dug them out.

Satakentia does great for me and since cutting down the jacaranda a couple of years ago I've almost got it acclimated to full all day sun.

Technically I have Sandy Loam, but it's a metavolcanic rock hillside (fractured rock, much harder than granite), so it's not actual sand, that just refers to the aggregate size. Drip works fine, drip works for everything, it's awesome. From what I've experienced and observed in many gardens is that you can never get the water that a tree needs by watering with a hose. You'll probably use more water, but it won't be delivered to the deep roots like a tree loves and will thrive on.

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KennyRE317

Matt, how large is your entire property? Looks massive

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MattyB

It's 1 acre, but there's roughly a total of 15 acres of open space on three sides of it, so it looks bigger than 1 acre.

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_Keith

It's 1 acre, but there's roughly a total of 15 acres of open space on three sides of it, so it looks bigger than 1 acre.

You have a lot of hillside, too, doesn't that technically add of to more planting space than a flat acre. Or do I have that the other way around?

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Sabal Steve

Wow, things have really changed since this thread 3 years ago. I've done pictorials and videos since, but it's probably time for another update. I've been trying to get my wife to come out with me while I take pics so that we can get some scale in there. I'll try and answer all your questions. The Pritchardia pacifica and P. thurstonii survived a couple of years in my upper garden, but as the leaves got bigger the cold damage just made them look too ratty, so I just dug them out. Satakentia does great for me and since cutting down the jacaranda a couple of years ago I've almost got it acclimated to full all day sun. Technically I have Sandy Loam, but it's a metavolcanic rock hillside (fractured rock, much harder than granite), so it's not actual sand, that just refers to the aggregate size. Drip works fine, drip works for everything, it's awesome. From what I've experienced and observed in many gardens is that you can never get the water that a tree needs by watering with a hose. You'll probably use more water, but it won't be delivered to the deep roots like a tree loves and will thrive on.

I never tried satakentia because I figured it wouldn't be warm enough here. I'm a little closer to the water.

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Sabal Steve

Wow, things have really changed since this thread 3 years ago. I've done pictorials and videos since, but it's probably time for another update. I've been trying to get my wife to come out with me while I take pics so that we can get some scale in there. I'll try and answer all your questions. The Pritchardia pacifica and P. thurstonii survived a couple of years in my upper garden, but as the leaves got bigger the cold damage just made them look too ratty, so I just dug them out. Satakentia does great for me and since cutting down the jacaranda a couple of years ago I've almost got it acclimated to full all day sun. Technically I have Sandy Loam, but it's a metavolcanic rock hillside (fractured rock, much harder than granite), so it's not actual sand, that just refers to the aggregate size. Drip works fine, drip works for everything, it's awesome. From what I've experienced and observed in many gardens is that you can never get the water that a tree needs by watering with a hose. You'll probably use more water, but it won't be delivered to the deep roots like a tree loves and will thrive on.

I never tried satakentia because I figured it wouldn't be warm enough here. I'm a little closer to the water.

but after some of the stuff that I see growing in your yard I'm starting to reconsider...

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