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Daryl

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Monòver
6 hours ago, steve99 said:

 

I took this pic last weekend in the rain.   I threw a few handfuls of bird seed on the back table and this group of Rainbow Lorikeets appeared from nowhere.  

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I am jealous. The only wild life in my garden is my two dogs:floor:

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doranakandawatta

Mokatti came to Doranakanda gardens and becomes a new member of the family (see Mokatti's story in a next post)

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Daryl

Pied Butcher Bird hanging out in my Dypsis 215 today...

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And an Eastern Rosella sunning himself late this afternoon...

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tropicbreeze
On 08/08/2016, 9:58:31, peachy said:
On 08/08/2016, 9:58:31, peachy said:
On 08/08/2016, 8:31:55, Cindy Adair said:

I recalled this great topic so am glad to see it again.

Here are a couple from Puerto Rico today 

 

and one from outside our hotel in Darwin Australia on the recent IPS post tour.

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Lots more wildlife on that trip for another thread!

I

 

On 08/08/2016, 9:58:31, peachy said:

I haven't seen a ring-tailed possum since I left Melbourne. Even the common brush-tailed possums are rare around here lately.

 

This one's a Northern Brushtail Possum, Trichosurus arnhemensis. The Common Brushtail Possum is Trichosurus vulpecula.

You can see mange on its face. They have adapted so well to life amongst humans that they over populate and live in stress. It makes them very susceptible to mange which they pick up from dogs and cats.

They're always hanging around my garden.

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Cindy Adair

I love seeing this! Nothing like them in PR!

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tropicbreeze

"Love" is a very wide ranging word with many meanings. Rufous Owls (Ninox rufa) at my place also 'love' possums. Preferably fresh, and with the bitey end removed at which they are very proficient.

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Daryl
On 7/24/2017, 6:37:37, tropicbreeze said:

This one's a Northern Brushtail Possum, Trichosurus arnhemensis. The Common Brushtail Possum is Trichosurus vulpecula.

You can see mange on its face. They have adapted so well to life amongst humans that they over populate and live in stress. It makes them very susceptible to mange which they pick up from dogs and cats.

They're always hanging around my garden.

pt-n05012622.jpg

Great photo!

 

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Daryl

Glossy Black Cockatoo enjoying the Allocasuarina..saw all three local species of Black cockatoos last weekend...not a very common occurrence!

 

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Kim

Wow, more great nature photos here!  I always return to this thread whenever someone adds something.  It cheers up the day.

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Palm Tree Jim

Such great photo's of the wildlife.

This thread never disappoints!

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tropicbreeze

One of the common 'jewel spiders' in my garden, Gasteracantha westringi, Spiny Orbweaver. View of the top side and the under side.

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Cindy Adair

Seeing clear, dramatic photos, often of animals unfamiliar to me, is one of my favorite bonuses of PalmTalk! Wow and thanks to all! 

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steve99

 

It was quite cold earlier today, so I wasn't surprised to see this Red Necked Wallaby sunning itself in clear patch out the back.

 

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Daryl

Tawny Frogmouth doing his best to look like a tree branch...

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Laaz

Tree frog in the lytocaryum.

 

 

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tropicbreeze

Little Red Desert Tree Frog, Litoria rubella. These have a wide range, from the north coast right down into the central desert regions and much of Australia. It's also in New Guinea. For a couple of years though, there's been talk that the species will be split. The desert one is supposed to retain the name and this northern one to be renamed, but still in Litoria genus. Don't know where exactly the dividing line will go in such a large area.

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Really full garden

These are hummingbird chicks.I am not sure of the species yet. It is difficult to imagine how tiny this nest is. The outer edge of the nest is 2 inches at most and is made of moss bits, spider webs and some type of fine plant fiber.

The first photo has taken the day they hatched ( August 14) .You can see remnants of the egg shell on one side of the nest.

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The second photo was taken August 22 and they have their eyes open.

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tropicbreeze

That's really small. How long do they stay in the nest?

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Really full garden
1 minute ago, tropicbreeze said:

That's really small. How long do they stay in the nest?

About 21 days . 

 

 

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Cindy Adair

These photographs are amazing everyone! Thank you so much!

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bubba

These folks are taking over South Florida lock, stock and barrel:

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doranakandawatta

I ignore the species, and I just discovered today the article about bats and palms in "Palms" magazine.

Here in our Morning garden, during the day:
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Really full garden
On August 23, 2017 at 7:25:28 PM, scottgt said:

These are hummingbird chicks.I am not sure of the species yet. It is difficult to imagine how tiny this nest is. The outer edge of the nest is 2 inches at most and is made of moss bits, spider webs and some type of fine plant fiber.

The first photo has taken the day they hatched ( August 14) .You can see remnants of the egg shell on one side of the nest.

IMG_1154.JPG.a4c5ba017b8a490dcd2df08da8a

The second photo was taken August 22 and they have their eyes open.

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Today

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tropicbreeze

Philippe, that looks like a Lesser Short-nosed Fruit Bat, Cynopterus brachyotis. Fairly common across southern and south east Asia.

Scott, not bad growth for a week. They must be getting a good feed. Not long now before they take off.

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Really full garden
8 hours ago, tropicbreeze said:

Philippe, that looks like a Lesser Short-nosed Fruit Bat, Cynopterus brachyotis. Fairly common across southern and south east Asia.

Scott, not bad growth for a week. They must be getting a good feed. Not long now before they take off.

Two days ago I had to brace the nest with a small branch. It was leaning at a precarious angle due to the weight of the chicks. I still have not been able to catch the parents near the nest to identify the species. Hummingbirds become very insectivorous while raising chicks. Small spiders are a favorite food.

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tropicbreeze

That's common with a lot of Honey-eaters. They get carbohydrates from the nectar but then also need protein for growth.

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The Silent Seed

This really is one of the, if not the, best threads on Palmtalk! I love seeing all the diversity. 

Makes me ashamed for not taking more pictures myself! It's very nice to see the iguanas make a comeback! 

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