Jump to content
Daryl

Garden Visitors

Recommended Posts

Silas_Sancona
6 minutes ago, tropicbreeze said:

Another stinging caterpillar, only these are savagely so.

Different family of moth again, some of the species get very gaudy colours and patterns. They're collectively called Slug Caterpillar Moths.

If you get about out bush in the wet season with shorts on you're bound to make their acquaintance. They feed on Cocky Apple, Planchonia careya, which often growns short and bushy, just around bare leg height.

mp05022308.jpg.60c5e96392d5646ce8ed35185cfad77f.jpg

We have similar species in this group here in the states, primarily back east/ in the south..  and yes, lol.. leave them alone. Have to be careful when trimming palms in some areas like Florida.

  Could be worse i guess, at least we don't have Lonomia obliqua aka the most dangerous caterpillar in the world.. Venom in the spines -which detach easily when brushed against or handled-  kills a few people in southern Brazil each year.  On the flip side, that toxic venom is currently being studied for potential medical benefits.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
greysrigging

The Aussie 'Itchy Grub' ( processional caterpillar ) in action at Cape Lambert, WA. A favourite  ( drunken after work ) pastime in the construction camp was to slowly turn the leader of the line right around until he sensed the tail end charlie, then they would just go round and round in an endless circle. Used to keep us amused for hours....haha.
Oh, and it seems I'm immune to the stings, too....

 

537892_644720875544685_1286058007_n.jpg

399653_644720888878017_1799626097_n.jpg

991932_665344170149022_1189062380_o.jpg

997847_665344106815695_785303579_o.jpg

1004205_665344056815700_1782947197_o.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
greysrigging

Female Common/Varied Eggfly butterfly (Hypolimnas bolina). Males are dark, no brown and have white round patches on their wings
The quality of the vid is a bit ordinary.... had to have the camera phone on 'close up' as this guy did not want to be filmed.... lol 
 

Edited by greysrigging
  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RyManUtah

I know very little about moths. I snapped this low quality photo of this stunning specimen before transplanting much further away from my vegetable bed. I’ve been searching for him for some time now. 

DA3DBAC5-9E78-4C5C-AD35-AF69AA8012E2.thumb.jpeg.db705bbd2b528312c81e3db3045b3b44.jpeg

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tropicbreeze

That 'horn' on its tail is common to Hawk Moth larvae. Yours is called Tomato Hornworm, much easier than its scientific name Manduca quinquemaculata.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sandgroper
On 7/30/2020 at 5:56 AM, greysrigging said:

The Aussie 'Itchy Grub' ( processional caterpillar ) in action at Cape Lambert, WA. A favourite  ( drunken after work ) pastime in the construction camp was to slowly turn the leader of the line right around until he sensed the tail end charlie, then they would just go round and round in an endless circle. Used to keep us amused for hours....haha.
 

We used to do exactly the same thing with them! Lol

537892_644720875544685_1286058007_n.jpg

399653_644720888878017_1799626097_n.jpg

991932_665344170149022_1189062380_o.jpg

997847_665344106815695_785303579_o.jpg

1004205_665344056815700_1782947197_o.jpg

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SailorBold
On 7/30/2020 at 9:17 PM, RyManUtah said:

I know very little about moths. I snapped this low quality photo of this stunning specimen before transplanting much further away from my vegetable bed. I’ve been searching for him for some time now. 

DA3DBAC5-9E78-4C5C-AD35-AF69AA8012E2.thumb.jpeg.db705bbd2b528312c81e3db3045b3b44.jpeg

 

Yep.. lol  that will eat a tomato plant overnight.  At least you are nice about it and move him.... I picked them off at one point and fed them to a cichlid when I had a fish tank. They really like them.  We call them hummingbird moths I think if thats the same kind.  I sort of am repenting right now.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SailorBold
On 7/29/2020 at 2:56 PM, greysrigging said:

The Aussie 'Itchy Grub' ( processional caterpillar ) in action at Cape Lambert, WA. A favourite  ( drunken after work ) pastime in the construction camp was to slowly turn the leader of the line right around until he sensed the tail end charlie, then they would just go round and round in an endless circle. Used to keep us amused for hours....haha.
Oh, and it seems I'm immune to the stings, too....

 

537892_644720875544685_1286058007_n.jpg

399653_644720888878017_1799626097_n.jpg

991932_665344170149022_1189062380_o.jpg

997847_665344106815695_785303579_o.jpg

1004205_665344056815700_1782947197_o.jpg

I swear... are you sure Australia isnt on another planet... most of your crawlies give me the heebie geebies..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
greysrigging

Haha.... this is the one that really puts the wind up me.... had a few 'experiences' with 'em over the years....


 

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tropicbreeze

I got washed off that crossing. Had to dive under the car to attach a rope to it. Long story though, but I had workmates there with .308's. Not sure if the .308's were for the crocs, or to give me a quick end. :(

The crocs like that causeway. Fish making their way upstream have to go through the shallow water on the crossing to where the crocs are waiting with mouth open. When they feel the fish brush by they snap. Sometimes you'll see a fish flip up into the air, sometimes you'll see the croc contendedly chewing away.


"A captain never leaves his sinking ship."

1032113040_Kdu01096b.jpg.0bce26a93031dd7f4c5fb673c46db94e.jpg

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
SailorBold

Ill wait until drought. lol

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
greysrigging

The latest Cahill's video...

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sandgroper
On 8/5/2020 at 4:09 PM, tropicbreeze said:

I got washed off that crossing. Had to dive under the car to attach a rope to it. Long story though, but I had workmates there with .308's. Not sure if the .308's were for the crocs, or to give me a quick end. :(

The crocs like that causeway. Fish making their way upstream have to go through the shallow water on the crossing to where the crocs are waiting with mouth open. When they feel the fish brush by they snap. Sometimes you'll see a fish flip up into the air, sometimes you'll see the croc contendedly chewing away.


"A captain never leaves his sinking ship."

1032113040_Kdu01096b.jpg.0bce26a93031dd7f4c5fb673c46db94e.jpg

I've seen some nice barra caught at the crossing there, unfortunately none of them were ever attached to my line.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
greysrigging

"Mum, we're just going down to the jetty for a fish.... ", said no kid ever at Pirlangimpi, Melville Island.....
118174931_3386890028016612_5110617832550302066_n.jpg.e0f34ada0b40d4675847b512bcc5ffa4.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tropicbreeze

They say "Imitation is the most sincere form of flattery". But there are other reasons for imitation. Like Batesian mimicry where some more palatable creatures adopt the appearance or behaviour of less palatable or aggressive species. Many Katydids of the Family Tettigoniidae fall into this category, particularly in the young (nymph) stage of their lives.

This Katydid nymph has the appearance of a Green Tree Ant, Oecophylla smaragdina. Its abdomen doesn't quite have the same bulbous shape of the ant's abdomen but the white colour on the side helps give that appearance. Body length is approximately 12mm, similar to the ant's size, however the antennae are about 2.25 times the body length, way out of proportion to that of the ant. The different colour of the distal part of the antennae compensates for that.

Interestingly enough, years ago I found a spider in the garden which also mimics the Green Tree Ant. Unfortunately didn't have the good camera with me and the photos didn't come out well. Haven't noticed any more since, but no doubt they'll be there "hiding in plain sight".

There's a couple of these Katydids on my Buchanania arborescens that appear to be feeding on pollen. Many of the flowers have been chewed away but haven't seen the Katydids actually doing that. I'm going to keep an eye on these and hopefully see them through to maturity when I should be able to get an ID. As they grow larger they lose the mimicry and depend on their colour for camouflage.

So, next time you see a Green Ant, look more closely. It might actually be an impostor.

gwn20091502.jpg.0bf8d286b948b0d48c7368d845cad835.jpg

gwn20091206.jpg.a92c78e5c7058797a8f8015981fc1561.jpg

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RyManUtah

Cooler weather is upon us. Can you spot someone resting on the Opuntia? 

86F134AF-3A85-46AB-BB9C-180A02FD9921.thumb.jpeg.4ec43c8f67b9fb80693d7f4d7886fae1.jpeg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
greysrigging

120862150_3555808994450177_6207276649929211639_n.jpg.e99a32f8cf9f7b6ee2012623dd599747.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tropicbreeze
On 10/4/2020 at 11:24 PM, RyManUtah said:

Cooler weather is upon us. Can you spot someone resting on the Opuntia? 

86F134AF-3A85-46AB-BB9C-180A02FD9921.thumb.jpeg.4ec43c8f67b9fb80693d7f4d7886fae1.jpeg

Two good reasons to not put a hand on a cactus.

 

14 hours ago, greysrigging said:

120862150_3555808994450177_6207276649929211639_n.jpg.e99a32f8cf9f7b6ee2012623dd599747.jpg

I hope those spannerlings don't have a nut allergy.  :floor2:

Edited by tropicbreeze
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
greysrigging

Sorry for the poor quality pics. The Joe Blake here didn't really want to co operate with the camera....slightest movement on my part spooked him/her. And I was looking into the afternoon sun....
Golden Tree Snake Dendrelaphis punctulata, tan to golden yellow, darker top with lighter underbelly, lighter markings along body, slate grey to bluish head and ...
First time I've spotted one in my yard.

Ps....I'm happy to share the garden with our native critters
120891853_3984685431548196_9004444155936887350_n.jpg.37907766b1e2cb8d0d66741acd6dd049.jpg

120724872_3984685554881517_1591442366046107985_n.jpg.d86196b7c8ea917839c02e3afee5c9cc.jpg

121100110_3984685831548156_416717152344060832_n.jpg.986e9fdccd852b602582f1491be1909c.jpg
  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sandgroper
1 hour ago, greysrigging said:

Sorry for the poor quality pics. The Joe Blake here didn't really want to co operate with the camera....slightest movement on my part spooked him/her. And I was looking into the afternoon sun....
Golden Tree Snake Dendrelaphis punctulata, tan to golden yellow, darker top with lighter underbelly, lighter markings along body, slate grey to bluish head and ...
First time I've spotted one in my yard.

Ps....I'm happy to share the garden with our native critters
120891853_3984685431548196_9004444155936887350_n.jpg.37907766b1e2cb8d0d66741acd6dd049.jpg

120724872_3984685554881517_1591442366046107985_n.jpg.d86196b7c8ea917839c02e3afee5c9cc.jpg

121100110_3984685831548156_416717152344060832_n.jpg.986e9fdccd852b602582f1491be1909c.jpg

They're great little snakes!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tropicbreeze
6 hours ago, greysrigging said:

Sorry for the poor quality pics. The Joe Blake here didn't really want to co operate with the camera....slightest movement on my part spooked him/her. And I was looking into the afternoon sun....
Golden Tree Snake Dendrelaphis punctulata, tan to golden yellow, darker top with lighter underbelly, lighter markings along body, slate grey to bluish head and ...
First time I've spotted one in my yard.

Ps....I'm happy to share the garden with our native critters

I get a lot of these at my place, used to get more before the cane toads turned up. They're a daytime snake, extremely agile and swift. When they're going up a tree it looks more like they're 'levitating' rather than gripping the tree. There's a bit of colour variation. I've noticed those in central Arnhem Land tend to have a more golden colour than the ones here.

apn12092607.jpg.ead61b7ff1e355202a2173fa61cf9ffb.jpg

apn12092608.jpg.1b2a6fc97262c1b25004de3fcff20deb.jpg

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Stevetoad

Just caught this little gecko in my yard. Looks like he hatched this year. 

68F948C6-3E0A-4DC5-8488-8AB217D77B76.jpeg

E4B686C4-EA4D-4547-AE9C-300FFE43E383.jpeg

  • Like 5
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tropicbreeze

A bird playing possum? Disturbed this little fella in my fairly large backyard. While the parents were trying to distract me by fluttering around as though injured the little bloke went to ground. It stayed like that for ages whilst not too far away the parents made a soft intermittent call, apparently a signal to "keep your head down and don't move".

These are Bush Stone Curlew, a night bird with a loud, mournful, high pitched wailing call. With a group of them together it becomes quite a performance, each one trying to out do the others. The indigenous people where I lived in Arnhem Land believed they cavorted with malignant night spirits. But closer this way the belief seems to be that they bring news of death, which makes some people fear them. I quite like the ruckass they make throughout the night.

A while back the Twitchers got a bit twitchy about the name Bush Stone CURLEW, saying the Curlew is a different unrelated bird. So they coined the name Bush Thick-knee. However, it seems everyone has gone back to Bush Stone Curlew again, although both names still crop up.

gwn20102208.jpg.633ba1c2057daf423f752b13db45a186.jpg

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Silas_Sancona

We have a similar type of bird here in the U.S. called Killdeer, or Charadrius vociferus whose young are colored similarly and can be found quite a distance from permanent sources of water where most Plover-type birds seldom stray from. Adults will hobble around like they have a broken wing and call chaotically whenever something or someone approaches a nest.  Stumbled upon several chicks in a seldom used corral as a kid. Was surprised how well they blended into their surroundings when crouched low to the ground to avoid being seen. Chicks of some other native Sandpipers/Plovers which nest near beaches also blend in with their environment as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
greysrigging
2 hours ago, tropicbreeze said:

A bird playing possum? Disturbed this little fella in my fairly large backyard. While the parents were trying to distract me by fluttering around as though injured the little bloke went to ground. It stayed like that for ages whilst not too far away the parents made a soft intermittent call, apparently a signal to "keep your head down and don't move".

These are Bush Stone Curlew, a night bird with a loud, mournful, high pitched wailing call. With a group of them together it becomes quite a performance, each one trying to out do the others. The indigenous people where I lived in Arnhem Land believed they cavorted with malignant night spirits. But closer this way the belief seems to be that they bring news of death, which makes some people fear them. I quite like the ruckass they make throughout the night.

A while back the Twitchers got a bit twitchy about the name Bush Stone CURLEW, saying the Curlew is a different unrelated bird. So they coined the name Bush Thick-knee. However, it seems everyone has gone back to Bush Stone Curlew again, although both names still crop up.

gwn20102208.jpg.633ba1c2057daf423f752b13db45a186.jpg

I know them simply as bush Curlew. There is a mated pair living in the park near my house, they serenade me most nights with their mournful calls. The female lays 2 eggs in a nest scrape on the ground, usually at the foot of a tree, and from my observations both birds care for the eggs. On a few of my demolition jobs over the years, I've had to fence off the nest site to protect the eggs and chicks ( same as Plovers )
I think this is the female bird on sitting on the eggs. They do camouflage very well..
1917501_104137892936322_2327673_n.jpg.60c83668e3e145089be2558a4cfea72f.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tropicbreeze
On 10/26/2020 at 1:34 PM, Silas_Sancona said:

We have a similar type of bird here in the U.S. called Killdeer, or Charadrius vociferus whose young are colored similarly and can be found quite a distance from permanent sources of water where most Plover-type birds seldom stray from. Adults will hobble around like they have a broken wing and call chaotically whenever something or someone approaches a nest.  Stumbled upon several chicks in a seldom used corral as a kid. Was surprised how well they blended into their surroundings when crouched low to the ground to avoid being seen. Chicks of some other native Sandpipers/Plovers which nest near beaches also blend in with their environment as well.

The "old broken wing trick" is popular amongst birds. Ground birds being so vulnerable need as many tricks as they can muster.

 

22 hours ago, greysrigging said:

I know them simply as bush Curlew. There is a mated pair living in the park near my house, they serenade me most nights with their mournful calls. The female lays 2 eggs in a nest scrape on the ground, usually at the foot of a tree, and from my observations both birds care for the eggs. On a few of my demolition jobs over the years, I've had to fence off the nest site to protect the eggs and chicks ( same as Plovers )
I think this is the female bird on sitting on the eggs. They do camouflage very well..

I've made recordings of their calls so can listen to them any time. Pretty sure 2 eggs are normal. Last year I managed a photo of two chicks in my backyard at night. They didn't go to ground but their parents were going quite 'hysterical' close by.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
greysrigging
40 minutes ago, tropicbreeze said:

I've made recordings of their calls so can listen to them any time. Pretty sure 2 eggs are normal. Last year I managed a photo of two chicks in my backyard at night. They didn't go to ground but their parents were going quite 'hysterical' close by.

Also the parent birds will approach you giving the old 'death stare'..... never fazed me though, I was used to it from my ex missus....lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...