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Daryl

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greysrigging

We don't have 'em in the Territory..... mind you my kids are/were terrified of them after hearing Dad's tales at bedtime.....:rolleyes:

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Missi
On 7/17/2019 at 2:59 PM, NOT A TA said:

You must really like having chickens Missi! I think I'd get rid of the food source so the bears would find somewhere else to scavenge/hunt.

Yes, I love my chickens! They keep me company when I'm gardening and they're very entertaining to watch. :wub: We have always had bears wander through our lot, even before the chickens. I used to ride my bike around the area around dawn and dusk (when it's the least sweltering) and they would wander out into the street right in front of me. I was more concerned about the stray dogs than the bears. The food source is the fact many of the households in our rural community don't wait until morning to put their trash out, even though they know better. :rant: We live in the middle of Florida's most populated bear country, so we have to adjust our lifestyles accordingly so we can life alongside each other. We're installing a hot wire barrier on the pen very soon.  Once a bear gets its paw or nose zapped, it is quickly trained not to go near the area again.

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Hillizard

Today while I admired both my Parajubaea tor tor and the Caesalpina pulcherrima in my garden, this hummingbird only had eyes for its next drink. ^_^

Caesalpinia.png

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Daryl

Not what you want in your palm garden....hopefully he decides to move on! Brush Turkey's have a love of mulch and do  a lot of damage to garden beds and any palms/roots in their path get destroyed by their digging antics!

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NOT A TA

This little Iguana was watching me pot up Crotons this afternoon. That is, till he/she started digging up the soil in the pot in the pic and I had to shoo it away.

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The Silent Seed

That's a beautiful Cuban Anole - no idea how to sex them, but if it was digging around, it was probably looking to lay an egg or two. 

You probably see these all day long - I think they are beautiful. 

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NOT A TA
9 hours ago, santoury said:

That's a beautiful Cuban Anole - no idea how to sex them, but if it was digging around, it was probably looking to lay an egg or two. 

You probably see these all day long - I think they are beautiful. 

I'm obviously no S FL wildlife expert! hahaha The small Iguanas take off so fast this colorblind guy with ole man eyes can't really see them. The old ones don't take off quite so quick and being bigger are easier to see. Anole makes sense of why it didn't scurry away like the small Iguanas.

This little guy watches me when I'm working on my high school landscape project. Patient it is and will watch for hours while I weed etc. around the entrance to it's home. It lives under the concrete directly under where it is in the pic. Locals call these curled tail guys Hatian lizards but I don't know if that's correct.

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The Silent Seed

Those baby iguanas sure are fast! They are one of my favorite animals, and usually there's one in my household, but not for a few years now. 

That's a cutie pie right there - and it is indeed a Curly Tailed Lizard. No idea if it's a native of Haiti though! 

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Silas_Sancona
1 hour ago, NOT A TA said:

I'm obviously no S FL wildlife expert! hahaha The small Iguanas take off so fast this colorblind guy with ole man eyes can't really see them. The old ones don't take off quite so quick and being bigger are easier to see. Anole makes sense of why it didn't scurry away like the small Iguanas.

This little guy watches me when I'm working on my high school landscape project. Patient it is and will watch for hours while I weed etc. around the entrance to it's home. It lives under the concrete directly under where it is in the pic. Locals call these curled tail guys Hatian lizards but I don't know if that's correct.

20190726_191642_zpssqq2ifwd.jpg

Yep, Northern Curly Tailed Lizard, leiocephalus carinatus (  Leiochepalidae ) Hard to say whether male or female ( no distinct color differences between the sexes /  dew lap on males, commonly seen in male Anoles / among other iguanid Genera ) but males tend to be a bit larger.  Introduced to Florida from the Bahamas / Caribbean in the 1940s to help control pests of Sugar Cane. Supposedly is spreading through the state and preys upon Brown / Cuban Brown Anoles,  Anolis sagrei. 

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NOT A TA

Sugar cane was commercially grown very close, if not on my property back in the 40's and there's still current sugar cane fields just a mile or two inland. Most of my neighbors grow sugar cane in their yards.

Any entomologist types watch this thread? My limited knowledge is from up North in zone 5.   This guy decided to go for a swim in my coffee yesterday when I wasn't looking. I fished it out before it died and set it to dry. Took the pic and it was gone after I put the phone away. I saw another one about a year ago, in the cab of my truck while driving! With my vision I thought it was a Hulk version of a yellow jacket. Pulled over and asked it to get out.

20190825_181523_zpsvtb9i7sk.jpg

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Silas_Sancona
50 minutes ago, NOT A TA said:

Sugar cane was commercially grown very close, if not on my property back in the 40's and there's still current sugar cane fields just a mile or two inland. Most of my neighbors grow sugar cane in their yards.

Any entomologist types watch this thread? My limited knowledge is from up North in zone 5.   This guy decided to go for a swim in my coffee yesterday when I wasn't looking. I fished it out before it died and set it to dry. Took the pic and it was gone after I put the phone away. I saw another one about a year ago, in the cab of my truck while driving! With my vision I thought it was a Hulk version of a yellow jacket. Pulled over and asked it to get out.

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Not 100% certain, but thinking this might be a local sp. of Mydas Fly instead of a wasp sp. Horse fly- like eye arrangement and  thick, almost cricket like thigh section of the back legs looks similar to this Genus / Family of Flies vs. larger wasps like Ciciada Killers, Paper, mud dabber,  cricket hunter, wasps, or Tarantula / other larger spider Killing wasp sp. with a similar body shape.

Larve of Mydas flies are supposed to be benificial as well, thinking they attack the larve / grubs of various Beetles. 

One or two sp, Esp Gauromydas heros, in the section of the family that resides in Central and S. America are considered the largest " flies" in the world. Big, but not a threat to people. 

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The Silent Seed

Keep in mind that all flies (literally, Diptera) have two wings whereas all other insects have four or none, depending on stage of growth. 

Edited by santoury

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tjwalters
On 8/26/2019 at 11:50 PM, The Silent Seed said:

Keep in mind that all flies (literally, Diptera) have two wings whereas all other insects have four or none, depending on stage of growth. 

This may be of interest to some:

Diptera (flies) have hind wings that are reduced and modified to halteres, effectively giving them one pair of wings.  Some Diptera are wingless.

Coleoptera (beetles) have front wings modified to elytra (wing covers), effectively giving them one pair of wings.

Stepsiptera (twisted-wing insects) have front wings greatly reduced, effectively giving them one pair of wings.

 

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The Silent Seed

TJ - awesome info - thank you! 

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tjwalters
On 8/26/2019 at 2:12 PM, Silas_Sancona said:

Not 100% certain, but thinking this might be a local sp. of Mydas Fly instead of a wasp sp. Horse fly- like eye arrangement and  thick, almost cricket like thigh section of the back legs looks similar to this Genus / Family of Flies vs. larger wasps like Ciciada Killers, Paper, mud dabber,  cricket hunter, wasps, or Tarantula / other larger spider Killing wasp sp. with a similar body shape.

Larve of Mydas flies are supposed to be benificial as well, thinking they attack the larve / grubs of various Beetles. 

One or two sp, Esp Gauromydas heros, in the section of the family that resides in Central and S. America are considered the largest " flies" in the world. Big, but not a threat to people. 

This appears to be Mydas maculiventris.

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Silas_Sancona
1 hour ago, tjwalters said:

This appears to be Mydas maculiventris.

Tj, Thanks for narrowing down the id. 

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