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Daryl

Tawny Frogmouth...has the stares!

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Missi
4 hours ago, Daryl said:

Tawny Frogmouth...has the stares!

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:yay: SOOO CUTE!! :wub:

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Palm crazy

First major rain storm for 2019. Critters will find any place to keep dry. 

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tropicbreeze

Through my window this morning. Mrs Macropus agilis, (Agile Wallaby) with Macropus agilis Jnr.

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tropicbreeze

Green Tree Frog, Litoria caerulea, on Carpentaria acuminata.

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Palm crazy

Feeding time! Stellar Jay. 

 

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Palm crazy

We got a little snow last night and the birds are taking it in stride. Robins are all over the holly tree finding shelter and eating the berries. 

A hummingbird is staying close to the food source. 

 

 

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Silas_Sancona
16 minutes ago, Palm crazy said:

We got a little snow last night and the birds are taking it in stride. Robins are all over the holly tree finding shelter and eating the berries. 

A hummingbird is staying close to the food source. 

 

 

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Grate pictures! How much snow fell?

Have to say the Hummingbird looks a bit  *Angry bird*-'ish  at the moment, though, lol:lol:

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Palm crazy

Around 2"-3" but father north got 7"-8".  Yea that hummer doesn't look happy but they are pretty tough for their size. 

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Silas_Sancona
9 hours ago, Palm crazy said:

Around 2"-3" but father north got 7"-8".  Yea that hummer doesn't look happy but they are pretty tough for their size. 

Not bad.. but feel free to keep it up there, lol.. 

Tough for sure.. Anything that can tolerate snow covered flowers, let alone buzz around chasing rivals in the garden, or vocally harass me for not re-filling their feeder when it's 115F out ( and i'm hiding indoors) is a tough cookie.. 

Waiting to see what happens across the S.F. Bay Area overnight.. hearing the snow level around San Jose may fall to 1000' ..with a not-so-outside chance flakes could be seen down to 4 or 500' (..or lower, esp. in the North Bay) by tomorrow morning, if any showers are hanging around at that time. Pretty sure all local peaks, and a few that rarely see any, will be capped, and / or dusted nicely should that happen.  Rare for sure, but happens every few years. Wasn't all that long ago Santa Cruz, at sea level, saw more than a few snow flakes.. 

Yesterday was mild / humid but somewhat Seattle-like with drizzly rain and low clouds most of the day here. More rain on the way.

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steve99

Here's something you don't see too often, not in my garden anyway. It's a rare Lamington Spiny Crayfish and only found in my local area.  To be honest, I didn't even know they existed.

 

 

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tropicbreeze

Steve, doesn't look like a lamington :lol: . Great colour scheme. None of our species come up out of the water, not voluntarily anyway.

 

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Estlander

Green Anole on my P. Sylvestris. They’re not really visitors but more like residents of my yard, lol. 

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Silas_Sancona
On 3/20/2019 at 6:16 PM, Estlander said:

Green Anole on my P. Sylvestris. They’re not really visitors but more like residents of my yard, lol. 

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Always had about  half a dozen Greens hanging out in my plants when in Bradenton, along w / Brown Anole ( all over the place ) ...which i'd find napping in various things at night. 

While not documented, as far as i am aware, i come across Brown A's around here every so often. Green Anole have also apparently started colonizing parts of Southern CA, esp. around San Diego County in the last several years.  Browns have also been sighted in the same spots also.  Always interesting how they'll sit on their branch, and glare at you w /one eye before running off.

While apparently displaced in my neighborhood / this area of Chandler, Desert Spiny Lizards ( pictured below ) are often common in yards that border local open spaces / parks, etc. While they look big, they're actually pretty docile, especially once used to people. There are Y.T. videos of these guys running up to people who feed them meal worms. Some will even come to your  patio door at X time during the day for lunch or dinner.. Pretty smart for a Lizard.. Very colorful as well.  Most other Lizards here, inc the Ornate Tree Lizards that occupy the Mesquite and block wall out back keep their distance. 
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Palm crazy

Sorry, not the best photo.  Red-breasted Sapsucker taking a bath in the waterfall. 

 

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greysrigging

A pair of Green Tree Frogs doing.... err..... something .... in the bird bath. I have buckets, tubs and the wheelbarrow full of tadpoles at the moment. Have to put the containers up off the ground to stop the Cane Toads laying in them.

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Silas_Sancona

That time of year again for spotting rarer birds hanging out in "The Beast" out back..  Because this particular Mesquite is one of the bigger trees in the neighborhood, and isn't trimmed too often, it attracts the attention of anything w/ wings that either hang out year round,  or might be passing through the area on their way south or further north / up into the mountains for the summer..  Aside from the usual suspects that are seen or heard on a daily basis, have seen several less common species including Warblers, Oriole, Tanagers, and a Roadrunner ( weirdest sound i have ever heard ) Every so often, i'll find the neighborhood Hawks or Owls up in the Canopy also. Pretty sure if there were a couple more Mesquite of similar size surrounding the house, even more rarities would show up.

Warbler sp.. Not sure on the exact species though. Could be an Orange Crowned but again, several species pass through the low desert this time of year, some look similar, esp female or immature. This one sat still long enough to get at least a couple somewhat decent shots.
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Today's "Taste of the wild" came while shuffling some stuff around in anticipation of a big wind event forecast for later today / tonight and tomorrow.. While moving one of my Cycads, caught sight of a Cooper's Hawk taking off from behind my shade house where my Basenji likes to sit and watch for Cats while sunning himself when outside.   After watching the Hawk perched up in the Mesquite for a few minutes, i walked over to see Ash ( my Basenji ) trying to get at something hidden between some pots in the Alley way between the house and shade house. Turns out it was an Inca Dove. Took off when i attempted to pick it up to see if the Hawk had grabbed it, before Ash chased off the Hawk.. and resumed sniffing around for the Dove. Happened too fast to run and grab my Camera so no pictures.

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tropicbreeze

That's why I go around with a compact camera (submersible to 30 metres depth of water) in my pocket. Even so, I still end up missing some great shots. Things happen fast, sometimes faster than you can get the camera out. But I did get a photo of a Rufous Owl killing a possum. Actually just after the kill - time it took getting my camera out.

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greysrigging

Dysphana numana or the 4 o'clock moth as known locally, having a spell under my house. Fairly common visitor to my garden.

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Silas_Sancona
2 hours ago, tropicbreeze said:

That's why I go around with a compact camera (submersible to 30 metres depth of water) in my pocket. Even so, I still end up missing some great shots. Things happen fast, sometimes faster than you can get the camera out. But I did get a photo of a Rufous Owl killing a possum. Actually just after the kill - time it took getting my camera out.

LOL, mine is usually in my pocket,just for such reasons. Even so, i was on the complete other side of the yard when the Hawk swooped in just over my head. I almost ran and grabbed the camera anyway just to get pictures of him up in the tree but knew he would have flown off before i returned.. 

Whole situation reminded me of another " things happen too fast sometimes" moment last year when i'd put my camera down after getting shots of a sunset.. Turned around to head back inside as it started raining and was lit up by a Lightning strike.. in full view, maybe a mile away..  "If only i'd kept the camera going just a bit longer"..  Gotta love nature's timing sometimes..:rolleyes:

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Cindy Adair

One day I will get a good photo of the charming endemic San Pedrito birds (PR tody) or the introduced reclusive mongoose.

Many anoles and coquis I should post too!

Thanks to all for the many wonderful photos of garden visitors from around the globe! With our gardens large and small, we all help provide habitat for such amazing creatures.

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tropicbreeze

This is the Rufous Owl, Ninox rufa, with the Northern Brush-tail Possum, Trichosurus arnhemensis (minus head).

I heard the fight going on up in the trees overhead but couldn't catch anything in the torchlight until the Owl settled down on the railing. It didn't appreciate having an audience while it dined so flew off soon after. Rufous Owls are quite powerful. Possums can put up a good fight and they're fairly heavy for an owl to fly with.

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greysrigging

Our local Avian D10 Bulldozer, The Orange Footed Scrub Fowl. They are part of the Megapod family, ie mound builders. One of the few local birds to have benefited from suburban sprawl. Lush moist tropical gardens mimics the birds natural environment of monsoonal vine forest. They mate for life and are very territorial. The video shows a pair running off some intruders.

I have had a resident pair in my backyard that cause extreme grief.... lol. Constantly digging and uprooting newly planted seedlings and building mounds. But as luck would have it they have moved 10' over the boundary fence to my neighbors yard and commenced to build a nesting mound ( much to his disgust haha ) Me chucking a bit of garden litter, mulch and soil over the fence has certainly helped the construction of the mound ( do any nefarious thing to keep 'em out of my garden lol ! )

This is a half grown one that the mated pair will run off soon.

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Mound commenced last week in the neighbors yard

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A cheeky visitor ( not my pic )

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https://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/inquirer/love-and-war-in-our-own-backyard/news-story/3333f1da2e2205b3e6c988990d656b83?nk=03d8e51fe9b803874e636321f74460ff-1554936280

And finally an interview I did on local radio describing my nefarious scheme to encourage the birds to move in next door.... haha....

 

 

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NOT A TA

Great interview Doug!  I wish I grew up where you did so I'd speak the way you do.

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greysrigging
On 4/11/2019 at 12:25 PM, NOT A TA said:

Great interview Doug!  I wish I grew up where you did so I'd speak the way you do.

So here's the thing.... my neighbor was in on the joke.... he is the retired boss ( director/producer ) of the radio station that I did the interview on. His former emloyees thought it hilarious that he was on the end of the mound building caper, but I let him on the joke....

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