Jump to content
Tom S

Red Palm weevils found in Laguna Beach, CA

Recommended Posts

Tom S

Modern Tree Service who removed the first stated they had removed several other trees in the same area over the past two years with Red Palm Weevils in them.

WTF! A tree service sees repeated instances of pests and doesn't think to possibly report it for 2 years? :angry:

I wonder if a lot of the Phoenix dying in LA from the reported Fusiarium is actually RPW?

The owner of the second infested tree was told it was due to fusiarium until the Ag showed up looking for RPW. Much of today's meeting was to explain to the tree trimmers how to tell the difference, and to report any instances of RPW immediately.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MattyB

Here's the first clue on how to tell the difference

post-126-079252200 1288986269_thumb.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Perito

post-1839-030091100 1288987839_thumb.jpgpost-1839-096976100 1288987857_thumb.jpg

I took these photos this morning. It doesn't look like The RPW infected trees I've seen posted in this thread but I thought I should include it here anyway to see if anyone has any idea of what is affecting this tree. I already alerted the local Ag Department, and they said they'd go check it out. I removed a loose leaf base and exposed the white substance in the second photo, but couldn't get up high enough to really see what was going on there. Perry

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DoomsDave

Modern Tree Service who removed the first stated they had removed several other trees in the same area over the past two years with Red Palm Weevils in them.

WTF! A tree service sees repeated instances of pests and doesn't think to possibly report it for 2 years? :angry:

I wonder if a lot of the Phoenix dying in LA from the reported Fusiarium is actually RPW?

The owner of the second infested tree was told it was due to fusiarium until the Ag showed up looking for RPW. Much of today's meeting was to explain to the tree trimmers how to tell the difference, and to report any instances of RPW immediately.

HOLY [FECAL EXPLETIVE OBSCENE GERUND]!

That staggers my imagination, and I'll bet we'll find more very soon.

Not good. Someone ought to spank those tree services for incompetence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ron Vanderhoff

As Tom stated in his post, the Laguna Beach meeting was very well attended. I counted 150 present. Several were in attendance from CDFA, County, UC Extension and even USDA. Arborists were present from throughout Orange County and even San Diego.

Some notes that I made during the excellent meeting:

• Other than the two confirmed Phoenix, no other infested palms or RPW's have been found.

• The second palm confirmed with RPW was removed yesterday (the first was remove two months ago), with the supervision of CDFA personnel. I drove by it just before the meeting and the homeowner was out sweeping up the debris. It's gone, although nine days after confirmed live RPW's were identified. This tree was removed by a professional arborist at no charge to CDFA or the homeowner.

• Yes, it was reported that Jim Klinger (the owner of Modern Tree Service, who originally detected the pest) seemed to recall a few other Phoenix that had similar symptoms that his company has removed from the same neighborhood over the past year or two.

• Mr. Klinger's crew reported the unusual insects to Jim and Jim in turn showed a sample to Ed Black of Black's Tree Care in Tustin. Ed is a very good arborist with considerable experience. Ed knew the beetles and larvae were unusual and in turn brought them to County Ag. officials, who confirmed it as RPW. All of these people deserve a hero's recognition, in my opinion. They did the right thing. I suggest we not be critical, but thankful to these people. Let’s recognize them as very good Samaritans.

• I asked John Hooper of CDFA, who is the Program Supervisor of Pest Detection and Emergency Projects, whether the objective at this point was eradication or suppression. This is a very important distinction. John indicated the goal was eradication. I was glad to hear that.

• I asked John what the protocol would be upon another RPW discovery. Would it be to destroy the palm, treat the infestation, sanitize the palm mechanically, etc? He indicated it would depend upon the particulars of the infestation, how advanced it was, etc.

• At several times during the hour and a half meeting it was mentioned that a Technical Work Group has been formed and that considerable direction would be forthcoming from this group. I specifically asked if this was an international group or all domestic, especially with representation from Europe, the Middle East and other areas where RPW is already present and much research has already happened or is in process. The answer was a brief "yes".

• At the conclusion of the meeting I separately asked three CDFA staff if I could have a list of the Technical Work Group member’s names. One essentially said no, not until their recommendations were finalized and then their names would be available, along with their recommendations. I responded that input to this group, from other recognized RPW authorities, after their report is final would be of little value. Finally, with some reluctance, one of the USDA-APHIS directors agreed to email me the names of the members of this committee. I have not received it as yet.

• I asked what authority CDFA or USDA would have if an infested palm was on private property and the owner was uncooperative about removal, treatment or sanitation. John Hooper indicated that if this were to happen (hopefully unlikely) CDFA would need to begin a legal action in order to proceed. I replied that it took nine days to remove the second infested tree and even then it was performed as a "no charge favor" by a local tree service.

• Thus far 1963 properties have been checked by CDFA, 13,485 palms have been inspected and 141 pheromone bucket traps have been put into place. There was some concern that the traps are being place 6-7 feet off the ground and not at soil level. Although slightly less effective safety issues warrant the higher placement in such an urban environment.

• The surveys thus far have been essentially ground surveys with binoculars. Crown inspections of taller palms didn't sound like they were in place.

• Prior to Feb 10, 2010 palm importation was legal (with various phyto-sanitary permits, inspections, etc.). On Feb 10 a Federal Import Quarantine Order was place on all palms (in large part due to the threat of RPW) and importation stopped. If RPW arrived prior to this date on infested palms the unknown question is - what was the point of entry and where else might these infested palms have gone? If infested palms went several directions and into other communities, there is a real possibility that this is only one of the areas where RPW is now present. This has been the case in a few other recent invasive pest discoveries in Southern California recently. CDFA is probably a bit apprehensive about using all their resources into the Laguna infestation without resources to understand if there might be another (or two or three) even larger RPW infestation(s) elsewhere that they don’t even know about. So we need to on the alert for RPW throughout the palm growing regions of California, not just in Laguna Beach.

• Mr. Nawal Sharma of CDFA discussed regulatory issues and mentioned that there is no palm quarantine related to these detections yet. Nonetheless, he suggested that the movement of palms out of the immediate area although not illegal, would not be recommended. He implied that a quarantined would likely be forthcoming in the near future, once the Technical Work Group completed their work and submitted their suggestions.

• Prior to this meeting, apparently the CDFA/USDA/UC group met with members of the Laguna Beach City Council regarding these RPW discoveries.

• Individually, I suggested to several of the staff present that a public meeting should be made a high priority in the near future. Today’s meeting, although excellent, was intended for professional arborists and PPA’s, which probably is the right place to begin. I expressed that other stakeholders (including members of IPS, homeowners and other hobbyists) need to be communicated with on this issue. I followed that in the absence of information, people will begin making their own decisions (see many of the comments on this posting board as evidence). In the absence of information, much misinformation may get created and relayed, leading to incorrect actions and many over-reactions. The response to this request from the CDFA staff member that seemed responsible for communications was that future meetings with these other groups would be soon, but would likely be after the Technical Work Group finished their efforts. I have the sense that the next meeting might be in the upcoming two to three weeks. Stay tuned.

All in all, the meeting was very well presented and well executed. The panel took brief question during the various presentations and opened up the floor for several more questions at the end.

That’s my report today from Laguna Beach.

Ron

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MattyB

Nice report Ron. Thanks for asking questions and taking notes. You're right about being thankful that the tree guys reported this to the Ag dept. My first reaction is disbelief that this had been going on for several years and not been reported, but in all fairness the laborers probably didn't know any better and it sounds like once Jim saw the evidence he brought it to Ed for identification and we're lucky he did.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
DoomsDave

Nice report Ron. Thanks for asking questions and taking notes. You're right about being thankful that the tree guys reported this to the Ag dept. My first reaction is disbelief that this had been going on for several years and not been reported, but in all fairness the laborers probably didn't know any better and it sounds like once Jim saw the evidence he brought it to Ed for identification and we're lucky he did.

(Toes curling)

Yeah, I agree.

'Scuse me while I wash my red face . . . .. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mats

I took these photos this morning. It doesn't look like The RPW infected trees I've seen posted in this thread but I thought I should include it here anyway to see if anyone has any idea of what is affecting this tree. I already alerted the local Ag Department, and they said they'd go check it out. I removed a loose leaf base and exposed the white substance in the second photo, but couldn't get up high enough to really see what was going on there.

That looks like Fusarium wilt, Perry.

At the meeting in Laguna Beach, Dr. John Kabashima showed a number of photos describing Red Palm Weevil, Fusarium and Sudden Crown Drop to help the arborists narrow down the problems they're seeing in dying trees.

He then showed us the photo of the second Laguna tree found infested and said, "This is the tree from Laguna we just removed and one of the things to look at is the ring of fronds, like a Friar Tuck haircut. The center's dead, the older fronds are green."

Kabashima said,"Fusarium is actually going to hit the lower leaves first. It's not always the case but it's very common that this can happen. It can also hit the middle fronds, so it actually has green fronds, brown and then green again."

"With Red Palm weevil, you're going to see the new growth die and you're going to see the the ring of green fronds at the bottom."

"As arborists, we're hoping that you can distinguish between the Fusarium, Pink Rot and get us a little closer to the palms that are actually potentially infested with the weevil. But there's nothing to say that a Fusarium weakened tree might also be attacked by the weevil. It's very common for us to have two or three things in a dead tree."

Dr. Jim Downer, a specialist from Ventura studying Fusarium, was present and asked if the Red Palm Weevil was a vector for Fusarium and Nick Nisson replied, "It's a vector of other diseases, don't know about Fusarium, it's an excellent question."

That being said, it's probably a good thing that you alerted the Ag dept. Perry.

As has been noted, the weevil has probably been here for a couple years and it's important to widen the area of awareness and not just concentrate all the efforts on Laguna Beach.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Perito

Thank you Mats. The woman I spoke to at the Department gave me 2 alerts concerning Fusarium wilt. She looked at my photos and thought that it probably wasn't the case ; Fusarium tends to kill off 1/2 of the leaf more thoroughly at first and she could't see that in the photos. She did say however that she would swing by and look at the tree. I live in San Luis Obispo county and haven't seen any other Phoenix dying off like that. My eyes are opened a little wider, now that I've read about this new scourge, RPW. This particular tree looks like it was trimmed within the last year so it could have been infected with Fusarium by infected tools. Perry

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ferry

There is no risk at all to confound symptoms corresponding to RPW with symtoms of Sudden crop down or of Fusarium oxysprum f.sp. canariensis (f.sp. albedinis is fortunatelly not known in USA).

Symptoms of RPW on Phoenix canarienis (on date palm or young canariensis, it is a bit different) are consequences of the activities of the larvae that makes galleries at the bases of the leaves. Many infested palms in Europe have been discovered by trimmers when pruning a leaf they found a hole in its base. The other early symptoms visible from ground are some drooped palms or cut leaflets of the internal crown.

What Dr. John Kabashima Kabashima has shown does not correspond to symptoms but to evidences and unfortunately very late evidences.

As I wrote two weeks ago in a paper to be published in the next Palms issue, the situation in Laguna Beach and probably around (and perhaps in other places) is extremely worrying. Massive mobilization and training on early detection and palm sanitation are urgently needed to limit the dispersion of this pest. Municipalities, private owners, nursery sector, arborists have to organize and to ask for public conferences, training and financial assistance to face this terrible threat.

Best regards.

Michel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mats

What Dr. John Kabashima has shown does not correspond to symptoms but to evidences and unfortunately very late evidences.

My account of Dr. Kabashima's ~15 min. presentation was very incomplete, Michel.

I was just addressing Perry's question about the photo of the palm he posted with the dead lower fronds.

Dr. Kabashima did show us a number of images of leaf bases riddled with holes, emergent fronds cut/chewed off, etc.

This is an image of a large poster that was distributed at the meeting.

They want the arborists to display these at their workplaces to inform their employees of the situation.

This is a 4 sided postcard that they intend to mail out to the general public.

They also want these in all the arborist's trucks so again, that the employees who are in direct contact with the trees are aware of what to look for.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ron Vanderhoff

post-1839-030091100 1288987839_thumb.jpgpost-1839-096976100 1288987857_thumb.jpg

I took these photos this morning. It doesn't look like The RPW infected trees I've seen posted in this thread but I thought I should include it here anyway to see if anyone has any idea of what is affecting this tree. I already alerted the local Ag Department, and they said they'd go check it out. I removed a loose leaf base and exposed the white substance in the second photo, but couldn't get up high enough to really see what was going on there. Perry

I also believe this look very much like fusarium wilt. But I'm glad you're paying attention. Keep looking and keep the pictures coming.

Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ferry

Thank you Mats for this complementary information. Just one remark: I am not sure that the postcard with the title "Have you seen this bug" is well adapted. People don't have to look for the bug itself that is generally invisible but to abnormal leaves or crown symptoms. This communication is a bit misleading. It does not focus the people attention on what they have to observe but on something that they could find only when it will be to late.

When we see that palms presenting spectacular evidences of infestation like the two first palms discovered in Laguna Beach were detected and treated so late, that means that basic awareness and information are missing on what arborists and palms owners have to look for. Not hidden larvae or adults but crown and leaves abnormalities. In its first press release, CFDA was recommending to look for bugs at the base of the palms!

We have to be careful also of the real meaning of the great effort that has represented the inspection of more than 10.000 palms by CFDA officials. It just means that at the moment of observation these palms did not present any evident symptom of infestation. It does not mean at all that none of these palms are infested. The first detected infested palms have released thousands of weevils. So it is evident that apart the original infested palms that haven’t yet been detected, tens of palms or more are infested in this area. The day after CFDA inspection or one week or one month later, symptoms of infestation of these palms will be detectable. Part of them would have been immediately detectable by trimming leaves to create an inspection window. So it is indispensable that after this first survey a permanent system of control is set up. On a so large number of palms, it is impossible for CFDA to carry on this activity alone. Even without window inspection implementation and palms climbing, right inspection from ground requires at least 1 to 2 minutes per palm and we have to add the displacement that represent in our urban context much more time. General mobilization and training of palms owners, arborists, gardeners, volunteers is absolutely indispensable. It is essential to discover and sanitize infested palm before they present evidence of infestation otherwise we are wasting money and efforts as the RPW will always be far ahead if we act too late.

It is urgent that in addition to the documentation that they have studied and the exchanges they had with international experts, officials from CFDA benefit directly of the large experience unfortunately acquired in Europe on this pest and are trained in the field to become themselves experimented trainers. I have proposed a training to CFDA here in Europe or I Laguna Beach as soon as RPW was confirmed but no answer till now.

Best regards.

Michel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gyuseppe

as you can see the phoenix canariensis no longer the central part,has this happened in 4 days!,

Immag007-5.jpg

Immag005-10.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ferry

The collapse of central leaves can be very brutal. It can occur in few minutes. In many places in Italia (Sicilia, Roma, etc.), Spain (Valencia region, Andalusia etc.) and South of France (french riviera) where migrant populations of weevils are very important because many evidently infested palms remain weeks and month without any sanitation treatment (removal, quimical or mechanical sanitation), infestation are of mass type and brutal central crown collapses are frequent. Such events do not mean at all that the weevils had time to escape from these palms (it occurs often before the end of the first biological cycle)and that the palms can't be sanitized and saved. But immediate sanitation must be implemented immediatly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mats

Michel, are the emergent fronds (either chewed or deformed) on this picture a possible indication of weevils?

Is this an example of what we should be looking for?

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ferry

Hi Mats

Where is this palm frm? It seems to me a palm that has suffered form an infestation (all the fronds of the middle crown missing or drooped down) that s recovering (central crown growing) or has been sanitized. Curious

I attach a photo of the cut leaflets symptom. Sometimes rats produce the same damage but the cut is not so perfect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ferry

post-5029-070752800 1289184005_thumb.jpg

Hi Mats

Where is this palm frm? It seems to me a palm that has suffered form an infestation (all the fronds of the middle crown missing or drooped down) that s recovering (central crown growing) or has been sanitized. Curious

I attach a photo of the cut leaflets symptom. Sometimes rats produce the same damage but the cut is not so perfect.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mats

Hi Mats

Where is this palm from? It seems to me a palm that has suffered from an infestation (all the fronds of the middle crown missing or drooped down) that's recovering (central crown growing) or has been sanitized. Curious

Michel, Kev Spence posted that photo HERE. I believe it was taken in Portugal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ferry

Hi Mats

Where is this palm from? It seems to me a palm that has suffered from an infestation (all the fronds of the middle crown missing or drooped down) that's recovering (central crown growing) or has been sanitized. Curious

Michel, Kev Spence posted that photo HERE. I believe it was taken in Portugal.

Mats

If it is a photo from Portugal, it is very clear. It is what I told you, an infested palm in phase of recovering. We have trained professionals there and in many places mechanical sanitation has been adopted.

I attach some photos of a palm recovering after sanitation:

- first photo just before sanitation all the leaves of the internal and middle crowns of one side of the palm drooped

post-5029-060042100 1289200461_thumb.jpg

- 09/09/09 just after sanitation

post-5029-064887000 1289200504_thumb.jpg

- 09/05/12

post-5029-089024100 1289200546_thumb.jpg

- 09/07/13

post-5029-039351100 1289200628_thumb.jpg

- 09/10/23

post-5029-031925400 1289200655_thumb.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kev Spence

The picture I posted, that I think is terminal RPW damage, is indeed from the Algarve in Portugal a dead head of a palm is clearly visible in the background and this picture zoomed in shows no central spear but just a mass of dead and decaying palm leaves.....I doubt very much if this is recovery.

IMGP3976.jpgweevil.jpg

IMGP3978.jpgweevil.jpg

These photos were taken last year not far from where Charles lives and I would hazard a guess they are not looking so good just now.

Do Phoenix canariensis recover from RPW?

These are the other fine specimens located next to the infected palms.

IMGP3975.jpgweevil.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tomas

Here is another palm showing visible damage, the lack of the central bundle of leaves, the irregular distribution of leaves in the crown and some leaves at an innatural angle.

post-738-072452500 1289332065_thumb.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tomas

In this case the irregular distribution of the leaves is of no significanse, it is due to the fruitification. Here also the central leaves are quite vigorous and dense, this palm is healthy instead.

post-738-084076900 1289332409_thumb.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tomas

I really do not think it is a good idea to defoliate the attacked palms, at the beginning the plants will flush new leaves, but in two-three months they will end like these, at least here in Rome.

post-738-039963400 1289332749_thumb.jpg

post-738-066605800 1289332802_thumb.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Nigel

Here is another palm showing visible damage, the lack of the central bundle of leaves, the irregular distribution of leaves in the crown and some leaves at an innatural angle.

CIDP when healthy always has such a symetrical architectural appearance, surely as Tomas says the first sign to look for is loss of symmetry in the crown itself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alberto

Which other palms were used as host by the RPW? I read that the queen and african oil palm are pottential hosts....Both are cocosoids...Is there in Europe any Jubaea infected with RPW?:unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tomas

Nigel,

actualy any of the three symptoms is indicating the presence of the weevil, no spear and the surrounding new leaves, irregular distribution of leaves, "broken" leaves. If you look at the picture #3 in Post 265, the palm on the left side has no spear and new leaves and it makes me thinking that it is immediately before the final collapse.

Alberto,

for the mediterranean region palms, it is Butia, Brahea, Jubaea, Washingtonia, Caryota and also Chamaerops and of course the date palm and other Phoenix species that are reported to have been killed. Trachycarpus too.

Tomas

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BS Man about Palms

What worries me about the above report is that they may not eat the other palms simply because they can't grow there. When presented with a cornucopia, they may have an appetite for anything palmy.. :angry:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Takil-Explorer

Southern California must be heaven for those weevils with all those palms! And no cold weather to kill them...

Alexander

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ferry

Mechanical sanitation does not correspond at all to leaves defoliation as indicated by Tomas. Mechanical sanitation is a technique that has been applied by trained trimmers to eliminate all the larvae. In many places, we have seen individuals or not trained professionals pruning the leaves. This is of course totally useless. To avoid these mistakes that are disastrous consequences, in most European countries, the regulations oblige professionals (municipalities or enterprises) that want to intervene on infested trees to be officially habilitated. To obtain this habilitation, they must follow an official training course organized under the supervision of the plant protection authority. We have given such courses in Spain, Italia, France and Portugal. The course is divided in theoric and practical part and last 2,5 days. One full day is dedicated to practices on sanitation and pest and palm understanding (location of the larvae, location of the terminal meristem, distinction between leaves bases and trunk tissues, etc.).

The photos of infested palm from Algarve that Kev Spence has shown us correspond to a palm that could probably perfectly recover after a right sanitation. Symptoms that are visible on the photos are just marks of attacks when the leaves were smaller. The fact that the leaves have continued to grow means that the terminal bud is not yet affected.

We have sanitized palms that were very much damaged. Don’t forget that with Phoenix canariensis the terminal meristem is very low in the crown and very protected. Regarding the way of weevils infestation, we have also to oppose with force to erroneous technical mistakes repeated nonstop for years by PPOs as well some scientists and media. No, the weevils do not attacked fist neither the terminal bud neither the trunk (except in case of deep wounds). The larvae remain for months in the leaves bases. I say leaves and not branches. Palms are not tree. We are not really pruned. They are just cleared of their leaves, something unique in arboriculture. With well done mechanical sanitation, we just cut parts of leaves bases, operation that cannot affect seriously any palm or any plant.

To finish, don’t forget that the first purpose of mechanical sanitation is to eliminate all the weevils of an infested palm to prevent or to stop immediately any dispersal of the pest. This is fundamental but also sufficient to eradicate this pest.

Regards.

Michel

I add photos of two palms that had to be deeply sanitized in june. After such apparently terrible operation, palms recover perfectly and rapidly especially if the sanitation takes place from end of winter to September. On several thousands of palms that have been treated like this in Europe, more than 90% recover totally and rapidly.

The second photo correspond to the palms of the first photo 4 months later.

post-5029-072147400 1289374853_thumb.jpgpost-5029-068248000 1289374873_thumb.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Charles Wychgel

l

I add photos of two palms that had to be deeply sanitized in june. After such apparently terrible operation, palms recover perfectly and rapidly especially if the sanitation takes place from end of winter to September. On several thousands of palms that have been treated like this in Europe, more than 90% recover totally and rapidly.

That looks good Michel.....in my case we left the lower leaves as we thought this would facilitate new growth; I am having second thoughts now seeing these pix and will discuss this with the trimmers

post-37-040915600 1289377779_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ferry

To maintain outside leaves row that corresponds to the last part to be infested is often possible and of course better for the palms recovery, especially from october to february.

The main problem in relation with maintening leaves is that the work is more complicated, needs more time and is more costly. Of course, when you put in balance the cost of sanitation with the value of the palm that otherwise will surely dies, the benefice remains considerable. The problem in Europe is that the situation has been so uncontrolled that the number of palms to sanitize urgently is considerable. So sanitation costs and duration, experimented and trained trimmers disponibilies are crucial parameters. One experimented trimmer can sanitize a palm in around half hour if he can eliminate all the leaves to reach easily the infested area. He will need much more time and it will be more complicated for him if he has to leave the external leaves row. For automn and mid winter time, we are experimenting an intermediate solution.

I send a photo of a training session last year in France.

Regards.

Michel

post-5029-034048700 1289392396_thumb.jpg

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BS Man about Palms

Michel,

Thanks for the clarification! I did not understand what you were talking about until those last few pictures. I then understood the text much better!

Thank you!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Mats

Michel, during a Google search for RPW I found this photo of you sanitizing a palm.

To clarify this process, I'm assuming you've removed all the fronds/leaf bases with a chainsaw and are now doing the final cleaning with a sharp blade.

Are you digging a little deeper to make sure you've exposed all the larval galleries or is it just to make a cleaner cut?

Will you then drench the crown with insecticides or inject the galleries with nematodes?

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ron Vanderhoff

Michel, during a Google search for RPW I found this photo of you sanitizing a palm.

To clarify this process, I'm assuming you've removed all the fronds/leaf bases with a chainsaw and are now doing the final cleaning with a sharp blade.

Are you digging a little deeper to make sure you've exposed all the larval galleries or is it just to make a cleaner cut?

Will you then drench the crown with insecticides or inject the galleries with nematodes?

Michel,

Also wondering if a recently sanitized palm, with fresh cuts, is more attractive to adults RPW's. It appears in literature that pruning and wounds on CIDP's often serves as an attraction to mated RPW's. Your thoughts and experience please.

Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
John in Andalucia

Michel, during a Google search for RPW I found this photo of you sanitizing a palm.

To clarify this process, I'm assuming you've removed all the fronds/leaf bases with a chainsaw and are now doing the final cleaning with a sharp blade.

Are you digging a little deeper to make sure you've exposed all the larval galleries or is it just to make a cleaner cut?

Will you then drench the crown with insecticides or inject the galleries with nematodes?

Michel,

Also wondering if a recently sanitized palm, with fresh cuts, is more attractive to adults RPW's. It appears in literature that pruning and wounds on CIDP's often serves as an attraction to mated RPW's. Your thoughts and experience please.

Ron

Ron, we brushed on this point earlier in the topic. You can pick up Michael's comments here: http://www.palmtalk....ndpost&p=425750

Many European forum members, including myself, know from experience how swiftly and readily RPW are attracted to pruned trees. I think it's a fundamental question that has yet to be answered: Should palm tree owners be advised against pruning their CIDP or Washingtonia in the area where traps have been set, without prior consultation with the authorities?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ron Vanderhoff

While scouting for RPW in Orange County, not far from Laguna Beach I came across this very healthy Phoenix.

post-5063-049204900 1289529518_thumb.jpg

I moved in closer to check for any early symptoms and noticed that the owner had gone to great lengths to install some sort of RPW microwave protective structure around the entire crown of the plant. No RPW's were found.

post-5063-002690600 1289529509_thumb.jpg

I hope this is not the future of Phoenix canariensis in California.

Ron

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Charles Wychgel

While scouting for RPW in Orange County, not far from Laguna Beach I came across this very healthy Phoenix.

I moved in closer to check for any early symptoms and noticed that the owner had gone to great lengths to install some sort of RPW microwave protective structure around the entire crown of the plant. No RPW's were found.

I hope this is not the future of Phoenix canariensis in California.

Ron

For a moment you had me there Ron :huh:

I have an updated list list of species affected; no fun reading :crying:

Red Palm Weevil - Presently-known hosts. (11 November 2010)

1. Areca catechu Betel nut Palm

2. Arenga saccharifera Sugar Palm

3. A. pinnata Sugar Palm

4. Bismarckia nobilis Bismarck Palm

5. Borassus flabellifer Toddy Palm

6. B. sp Palmyra Palm

7. Brahea armata Mexican Blue Palm, etc.

8. B. edulis Guadalupe Palm

9. Butia capitata Wine Palm, etc.

10. Calamus merrillii Rattan Palm

11. Caryota cumingii Philippines Fishtail Palm

12. C. maxima Giant mountain fishtail Palm

13. Cocos nucifera Coconut

14. Corypha utan (= C. gebanga, C. elata) Gebang Palm

15. C. umbraculifera Talipot Palm

16. Chamæerops humilis European Fan Palm

17. Elæis guineensis Oil Palm

18. Livistona australis Australian Fan Palm

19. L. decipiens Ribbon fan Palm

20. L. chinensis Chinese fan Palm

21. L. saribus (= L. cochinchinensis) Serdang Palm

22. L. subglobosa

23. Metroxylon sagu Sago Palm

24. Oncosperma horrida Nibong Palm

25. O. tigillarium Nibong Palm

26. Phœnix canariensis Canary Island Date Palm

27. P. dactylifera Date Palm

28. P. roebelinii Pygmy Date Palm

29. P. theophrastii Cretan Palm

30. P. sylvestris Indian Date Palm

31. Pritchardia pacifica Fiji Palm

32. P. hillebrandii Molokai Fan Palm, etc.

33. Ravenea rivularis Majesty Palm

34. Roystonea regia Royal Palm

35. Sabal umbraculifera Hispaniolan Palmetto

36. Trachycarpus fortunei Chusan Palm

37. Washingtonia filifera California Fan Palm

38. W. robusta Mexican Fan Palm.

Syagrus romanzoffianum if injured

Non-palm hosts.

Agavaceae: Agave americana (Century plant)

Poaceae: Saccharum officinarum (Sugar cane).

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kris

Dear Friends

This is one of the most painful threads that i came across,in palmtalk.And i could not bear seeing my favorite palm's head shaved...:( But i feel once a palm is infected seriously,its better to pull it down,since that area of the trunk will not be hard enough to withstand heavy breeze or storm,if this palm recovers and starts to grow once again to reach heights like other tall healthy phoenix palms.

I don't know how are my chances with the one i have planted just 2 years ago.Though its healthy at the moment.

Love,

kris.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...