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Tom S

Red Palm weevils found in Laguna Beach, CA

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The-ZonePusher

If it does start getting into a major problem this is what I would try. I would pull up all palms within a 2-4 mile zone ( black lines= palm free zone ) that would suround the infected zone ( the red line ) as well as a few miles farther of the furthest known infestations ( orange squares ). This I would hope would be a like a fire break. Then back in the the infected zone set up traps and use insecticide.

Heres a very quick graphic representation:

x2j7ut.jpg

Its not the greatest, and isn't very detailed or accurate;but gives you the idea of what I am talking about. What do you all think? I think some problems here lie within time, money and people to help? Also the insecticide might not be allowed?

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phoenixbob

Please find attached Guidelines For Red Palm Weevil from the USDA. This was sent to me by my contact at the Department of Agricultural Commissioner in L.A. County. I had to downsave it, as it was too big to be a regular attachment. It's a bit ugly. If you want the color version, feel free to PM me and I will send it to you.

Just FYI,

Alberto posted a link to the color version earlier in this same thread about a week ago.

Here is the color version, direct from the USDA site.

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John in Andalucia

So there is a disagreement on pruning vs not pruning and I see both points of view. Is there a product that can be painted or sprayed on the wound created after pruning to prevent the adult from laying eggs or even smelling the sap in the first place?

......

Using a sealant on a palm is not going to prevent RPW from sniffing out a freshly pruned tree.

Just to be clear.... repellents such as neem oil (not a sealant) as described by Maurice, is not what you are referring to here.

Jackie

Here is further reading on the control of RPW in date palms through use of insecticides, whereby it mentions: The treatments with Sunny Neem oil and Fenitrothion had poor efficacy of 42-57%.

Bear in mind, that these treatments involve high volume air compressors to thoroughly soak the tree, repeated five times, at two week intervals.

datepalm2_28.pdf

I can sense that in the US, the arrival of RPW is going to mean big business for some retail product manufacturers, but I really think RPW is out of their league and should be a job for the authorities. If you cut your leaves and RPW is nearby, they will be onto the scent before you've even dragged those fronds away to be burned. It's almost uncanny how they just suddenly arrive, and remember, you need to help contain the dispersal in these early stages. That's why I advocate not pruning for Californians in the infected region, without advice first, from the local authorities.

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Alberto

Please find attached Guidelines For Red Palm Weevil from the USDA. This was sent to me by my contact at the Department of Agricultural Commissioner in L.A. County. I had to downsave it, as it was too big to be a regular attachment. It's a bit ugly. If you want the color version, feel free to PM me and I will send it to you.

Just FYI,

Alberto posted a link to the color version earlier in this same thread about a week ago.

Here is the color version, direct from the USDA site.

It was posted before in this thread (I cannot find the original post now) .I only repeated the link and showed some interesting things I read in this USDA site.

I think this topic about the Red Palm Weevil is very important to folks from California and loaded with comentaries of people that knows this pest in there own country and garden..... So read it from the beginning, I would say.......:rolleyes:

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phoenixbob

News Article from Southern California Public Radio

Crews deal with discovery of destructive weevil in OC

You might have notice tiny boxes and canvassing work crews around lately, if you live in Laguna Beach. They’re trying to stop a pest known as the red palm weevil.

The tiny bug could spell trouble for local growers.

The weevil is a native of Southeast Asia. It attacks — and often kills — palm trees.

A landscape contractor spotted one in a tree in Laguna Beach this month and reported it to agricultural officials.

This is the first time the red palm weevil has been seen in the United States.

Agricultural officials have been conducting a door-to-door survey of the neighborhood and setting out about 250 traps to see if it’s an infestation. The network of traps will cover about nine square miles because the red palm weevil can fly pretty far.

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Toby

I can sense a certain amount of headless panic in this discussion. I think it would be good to review a few points:

- The RPW has been around for millions of years. Yet the native range of the RPW (Southeast Asia) is one of the most palm-rich regions on the planet.

- Areas where the RPW has been introduced many decades ago (Middle East, India) are not devoid of palms, to the contrary.

- The palm mainly affected in Europe is Phoenix canariensis. Other species do not seem to be affected in a major way.

- There are other, closely related Rhynchophorus species with a very similar life cycle naturally present in most parts of the tropics.

- Experience from the Canary Islands shows that the RPW can be eliminated with quick and sensible measures.

There is no suggestion that the RPW would eliminate all palms in a region. It is a shame about all those old P. canariensis being destroyed, but this is not the end of growing palms, just a major nuisance.

In the OC Register Article in the very first post of this thread, there is a picture:

post-1201-035585500 1287836114_thumb.jpg

Any guesses if this picture is of the actual bugs found in Laguna Beach or just some random picture from somewhere else? Judging by the ruler, it was taken in California, but the bug does not look like a RPW.

Best, TOBY

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phoenixbob

Another good local news article:

http://www.pe.com/localnews/sbcounty/stories/PE_News_Local_D_palms23.3069f9a.html

An insect that has decimated palm tree populations around the world has shown up in Southern California.

The California Department of Food and Agriculture said this week that a beetle discovered in a dead palm tree in Laguna Beach in September has been identified as the red palm weevil. The insect, a native of Southeast Asia, has caused major damage to commercial, ornamental and native palms throughout the Arabian Peninsula, Egypt and the Mediterranean. This is the first time the weevil has been found in the United States.

On Friday, a group of UC Riverside scientists met with palm industry representatives from the Coachella Valley who are worried about what the weevil's spread could mean.

"This is central to our livelihood," said Albert Keck, chairman of the California Date Commission and a third-generation date grower who farms 1,000 acres near Thermal.

Riverside County's date crop was valued at $33 million in 2009.

While Keck primarily is concerned about his industry, he said the problem potentially involves all of Southern California. The weevil is particularly fond of date, Canary, queen and fan palms, which are the dominant palms in California.

Nick Nisson, entomologist for the Orange County agricultural commissioner, said his office is concerned about the find.

"This insect is a very serious threat," Nisson said. "It's been on the radar of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. It's well known throughout the world."

It carries the potential to alter the Southern California landscape.

"Palms are iconic to California," Keck said, asking the nearly dozen scientists and university officials gathered in a conference room to imagine the region without its palm trees. "Hopefully we're at a stage where we can contain it and eradicate it."

No Quarantine

So far, state and Orange County officials have conducted door-to-door surveys in the area where the tree was removed, checking to see if residents have had any palms removed recently or have seen evidence of weevils. They have set traps for the insect in a 1.5-mile radius around the tree where the weevil was found. The area has not been quarantined.

Nisson said a tree-removal contractor brought the weevil to the attention of his office. Further inspection turned up more evidence.

"An adult beetle was found at the same property," Nisson said. "Since then (field personnel) have collected some spent pupal cases and typical damage from the weevil."

st we've ever faced." Hoddle said Southern California's very identity could be affected.

"If you pick up a post card of California, you're going to see palm trees," he said. "That's what people think of. This may be the worst landscape pe

He said his office is trying to move quickly on the problem.

"We've had the traps out and the visual surveys going ever since very shortly after the tree-removal service brought these in. So far, the visual inspection and the trapping has not picked up weevils outside a very small area. We're certainly hopeful that it's restricted to a very small area."

Nisson said traps, which contain palm bait and a pheromone that attracts the weevils, will be checked daily for an indefinite period of time. He said visual inspection of palm trees presents a problem, since the weevil often attacks in the crown of the tree.

The adult weevil, which is about 1 ½ inches long and can be either black with a red streak or red with small black spots and wing stripes, burrows into the trunk of the tree and deposits its eggs. The grubs, or larvae, can grow up to 2 inches long and feed by chewing through the cadmium layer of the tree, which damages the tree's ability to transport water. After the larvae go through the pupa stage, the adult weevils can continue to infest the same tree, laying another generation of eggs.

Nisson said officials don't know how the weevil got into Southern California. The U.S. Department of Agriculture already had imposed a quarantine on imported palms, he said.

"Through regular quarantine guidelines it would be very difficult" for a palm to get in, Nisson said. "But insects also hitchhike."

'Scorched-earth approach'

Mark Hoddle is director of UCR's Center for Invasive Species Research. He said he is worried about the weevil showing up in other locations.

He speculated that it may have been introduced by a palm enthusiast who knowingly brought in illegal plants. That individual, he said, could have brought in multiple plants and parsed them out to friends or customers in different locations. In that worst-case scenario, he said, there could be multiple focal points of infestation.

"Studies have shown it can fly about four miles in a three- to five-day period," he said. "They can live for about three months. Theoretically they could reach here."

On the other hand, he said, as long as the weevil has a living host plant, it tends to be comfortable and stay put. An infestation can kill a mature tree in about a year. Hoddle said it's possible the weevil could have been in the region for a couple of years already.

Some at the table felt it was important to be aggressive at the outset.

"It sounds like in the Mediterranean, these things got established and before anybody did anything, it was too late," Keck said. "That's why I think a scorched-earth approach in a small area might be the best."

The UCR scientists agreed to work up a proposal to establish a cooperative task force with state and federal officials and to seek federal funds for educating the public. They also plan to produce an economic impact report on what a widespread infestation might mean. About $70 million in ornamental palm trees are sold annually in California.

The scientists worried about the additional costs of removing and replacing dead trees.

They plan to meet again Friday.

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DoomsDave

I can sense a certain amount of headless panic in this discussion. I think it would be good to review a few points:

- The RPW has been around for millions of years. Yet the native range of the RPW (Southeast Asia) is one of the most palm-rich regions on the planet.

- Areas where the RPW has been introduced many decades ago (Middle East, India) are not devoid of palms, to the contrary.

- The palm mainly affected in Europe is Phoenix canariensis. Other species do not seem to be affected in a major way.

- There are other, closely related Rhynchophorus species with a very similar life cycle naturally present in most parts of the tropics.

- Experience from the Canary Islands shows that the RPW can be eliminated with quick and sensible measures.

There is no suggestion that the RPW would eliminate all palms in a region. It is a shame about all those old P. canariensis being destroyed, but this is not the end of growing palms, just a major nuisance.

In the OC Register Article in the very first post of this thread, there is a picture:

post-1201-035585500 1287836114_thumb.jpg

Any guesses if this picture is of the actual bugs found in Laguna Beach or just some random picture from somewhere else? Judging by the ruler, it was taken in California, but the bug does not look like a RPW.

Best, TOBY

Tobe!

Best post so far, say a-men.

Natural enemies, say it with me, ohhhhmmmmmm.

Etc.

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mlovecan

- Areas where the RPW has been introduced many decades ago (Middle East, India) are not devoid of palms, to the contrary.

I do agree with this statement. I have been in Oman for a week now ( they have had RPW since 1993 ) and have not seen a single palm affected. There are thousnad of palms here in the capital ). I have not yet visited any palm groves but suspect they have the situation relatively under control. However, the big difference between here and Southern Europe is the cultural, religious and food importance of the date palm. In southern Europe, palms are strictly for decoration.

- The palm mainly affected in Europe is Phoenix canariensis. Other species do not seem to be affected in a major way.

I don't completely agree with this statement. Out CIDP's are almost all gone - some just seem to be immune. Perhaps a genetic variation exists that repels them from the remaining ones. I guess in the long run these CIDP's may yield new generations of resistant CIDP's.

This year I suddenly lost a Majesty Palm ( I originally believed it had a fungal infestion but found about a dozen of both larvae and mature RPW inside along with that unmistabkable stench they cause ) which I have never seen on any vulnerable species list. I had a CIDP Hybrid infected ( I was fully expecting this - it seems cured for now ) and now my date palm is oozing from the trunk. The sheer volume of RPW flying around is quite astounding - so much I envision a locust-style concentration one day. The lack of CIDP's can only mean they are getting very hungry and will eat whatever is available.

Our biggest problem ( and that of other Southern European countries ) is less than half the dead CIDP's have been cut down. Any country that at least cuts these dead ones down ( and I'm sure that would happen quickly in CA ) certainly stands a much better chance than us.

Regards

Maurice

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mlovecan

Also, I do agree with Toby - that photo does not look like RPW - the shape is right but the coloration is all wrong.

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palmazon

Our local CIDP population has been under assault by Fusarium oxysporum over a decade, yet a great many remain standing; admittedly, it may take 5+ years for a mature specimen to succumb, but as awareness spreads, practices change, protocols are developed, etc. - much remains to be seen (and a lot depends on the weather). The RPW may prove to be a vector for transmission - who knows?

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Tom S

I wasn't home (my wife was) but the Ag guys just stopped by and were admiring my Palm collection. They put a trap on a CIDP down the street from me, so I will be keeping my eye on it. I'm about two miles away, and at 700ft higher altitude, so they are checking a pretty big area.

Tom

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phoenixbob

The Center for Invasive Species Research at the University of California, Riverside has posted a couple of really good articles about the RPW in California. This may answer some questions several have asked here in this thread. Weirdly, however, in one place they state that the weevil was found in September, and in another that it was found in August.

Press Release: http://newsroom.ucr.edu/news_item.html?action=page&id=2468

The weevil was discovered infesting a Canary Islands palm in a residential area by a landscape specialist in September 2010. The insect was subsequently positively identified as Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, the red palm weevil, by experts at the USDA-ARS Systematic Entomology Laboratory, Md.

...

Entomologist Mark Hoddle, the director of the Center for Invasive Species Research at UCR, noted, “The international trade in live palms is the most likely source for this pest. It was probably moved as eggs, larvae, or pupae hidden inside palms. These can travel great distances because they live with their food supply.” Once larvae emerge as new adults, they abandon their original host plant and fly to new palms, traveling as many as 7 km (~4.3 miles) in 3-5 days.

Adult red palm weevils are large beetles with body lengths of 35 to 40 mm (1.4-1.6 inches). The weevils have a long, slender “snout” which the female uses to penetrate palm tissue and create access wounds in which eggs are deposited. Adult weevils are predominately reddish-brown in the most typical form. The weevil collected in Laguna Beach has a single, contrasting red stripe running the length of the snout. The larvae are legless grubs, pale yellow with a brown head, some larger than 50 mm (2 inches).

“A strong message needs to go out as soon as possible to arborists and others in industry to keep an eye out for this deadly pest,” Baldwin said. “Unlike many previous agricultural pests, the red palm weevil is also an urban problem. We at the university have two ways to proceed: we assume the pest has already spread or we wait to see signs of it having spread. We are not willing to wait.”

There is also contact information for UCR scientists who are investigating this invasion.

**************************************************************************************************************************

General article: http://cisr.ucr.edu/red_palm_weevil.html Looks like much of it was written (at least partially) by Don Hodel (IPS, PSSC). Note the description of the weevils found in Laguna Beach.

The Situation: During August 2010, arborists removed a large dying Canary Island date palm (Phoenix canariensis) from a residence in the city of Laguna Beach, Orange County, California and reported finding adult weevils and weevil larvae with associated larval feeding damage in the top portions of the palm trunk. The weevils were subsequently identified as Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, the Red Palm Weevil (RPW), by experts at the USDA-ARS Systematic Entomology Laboratory in Maryland. This was the first record of this pest in the USA.

Monitoring for Red Palm Weevil Populations in California: In response to the RPW collection in Laguna Beach, state and federal survey crews deployed pheromone baited traps. Pheromones are airborne chemicals that the Red Palm Weevil responds too. These weevils are highly attracted to two different types of odors: (1) volatiles emanating from unhealthy or damaged palm trees, and (2) aggregation pheromones (commercially available) which male weevils release to attract other male and female weevils to palm trees that are suitable for weevil larvae to use as food. Neither the stressed palm odors or the weevil aggregation pheromone are very effective on their own. However, in combination they can be powerful in attracting weevils to traps. Pheromone traps make it possible to detect very low density pest populations that would otherwise be almost impossible to find.

In addition to pheromone monitoring, visual surveys of other palms in the area surrounding the find site in Laguna Beach were conducted. These visual surveys have confirmed the presence of R. ferrugineus at the original collection site. This collection in Laguna Beach represents the first time R. ferrugineus has been found in the United States. Survey efforts are underway around Laguna Beach to determine if an infestation of Red Palm Weevil exists, how widespread it is, and if it will be possible to contain and perhaps eradicate this highly destructive palm pest.

Dispersal: The international trade in live palms is the most likely conduit that has allowed this pest, probably moved as eggs, larvae, or pupae hidden inside palms, to move vast distances. RPW may establish readily in new areas because it has traveled with its food supply, or there are other ornamental or date palms nearby that it can infest once larvae finish developing and emerge as new adults that abandon their original host plant. Adult weevils are strong fliers and can fly up to 900m (~900 yards) at a time and they can move up to 7 km (~4.3 miles) in 3-5 days.

Symptoms: Early Red Palm Weevil infestations can be difficult to detect in large palms in the landscape unless access to the actively growing portions can be attained. It is important that arborists and individuals working in palm canopies be vigilant for signs of larval mines and frass (excrement) in leaf bases in the central growing point of the palm in order to detect signs of early infestation. Larval damage to leaf bases anywhere in the canopy revealed by routine trimming may also be a sign of feeding by young Red Palm Weevil larvae. Dieback in the apical (newest, uppermost, or center) leaves in the canopy is a common symptom of larval damage to the meristem tissue and should be investigated for RPW. Frass accumulating at points of injury or at the base of offshoots may also appear in infested trees. Adult weevils are strong fliers and would appear in flight as one of the larger beetles to occur in California urban landscapes. Identification: Adult Red Palm Weevils are very large beetles, attaining body lengths, including the rostrum of 35 to 40mm (1.4-1.6 inches). The weevils have a long, slender rostrum or “snout” which the female uses to penetrate palm tissue and create access wounds in which eggs are deposited. Coloration in Rhyncophorus ferrugineus is extremely variable and has historically led to the erroneous classification of color-defined polymorphs (variants) as distinct species. Coloration in the adult weevils is predominately reddish-brown in the most typical form. The Red Palm Weevil’s collected in Laguna Beach have displayed a distinct “red striped” coloration which consists of the dorsal surfaces appearing uniformly dark brown to black, with a single, contrasting red stripe running the length of the pronotum. The Red Palm Weevil, like other beetles, develops through complete metamorphosis, with larvae and pupae developing within the trunk and apical growth tissues of the palm meristem. Larvae are legless grubs with the body color uniformly pale yellow with a brown head. Larvae may attain lengths greater than 50 mm (2 inches). Larvae feed within the soft tissues of the meristem or leaf bases creating frass filled mines, enlarging and penetrating deep within the upper trunk areas as the larvae mature. Mature larvae construct a pupal chamber or cocoon made up of coarse palm fibers in which they pupate and occupy for approximately three to four weeks. The cocoons are located within the damaged tissue of the palm.

Life Cycle: To lay eggs, females use their long beak, or rostrum, to chew a hole into palm tissue. Eggs are then laid into this hole. Larvae hatch from eggs, feed on the surrounding palm tissue and bore their way into the center of the palm. The tunnels larvae form as they feed fill with frass and plant sap. The larval stage may last for about two months. Larvae pupate inside cocoons in the palm and this stage may last for about three weeks. Adult Red Palm Weevil emerge from cocoons, and females can lay eggs for around 8 to 10 weeks. Adult weevils live for about 2 to 3 months feeding on palms, and going through several cycles of mating and egg laying before dying. The sex ratio is slightly biased towards females (1 male to about 1.2 females).

Control Options: Suppression of Red Palm Weevil infestations can be attempted in several ways. Insecticides are probably the most common control tool used against Red Palm Weevil, and can applied in a variety of ways for RPW suppression including applications as dusts, liquid sprays. Trunk injections or soil applications of systemic insecticides that move inside the palm poisoning weevil larvae and adults may also be effective. Good sanitation practices are needed to prevent Red Palm Weevil spreading from infested palms. Chipping, burning, and burying infested material deeply can reduce the likelihood that Red Palm Weevil will emerge and escape from infested palms. Mass trapping has been used to reduce Red Palm Weevil densities. In this instance, aggregation pheromones are loaded into bucket traps along with palm material and granular insecticides. RPW adults are attracted by the pheromones and the plant material and fly into buckets. Once inside the bucket trap, the pesticide kills the weevils before they can escape. Biological control is the use of natural enemies, like predators, parasites, and pathogens to kill a pest. Red Palm Weevil is attacked by a variety of different natural enemies including parasites and small predators that attack weevil eggs, while bacteria, fungi, and nematodes can kill weevil larvae. Many of these biological control agents do not provide adequate control of Red Palm Weevil in the field. Host plant resistance can reduce the ability of Red Palm Weevil to damage palms because the weevil is unable to effectively exploit these hosts. The California fan palm, Washingtonia filifera, which is native to southern California and western Arizona, and the European fan palm, Chamaerops humilis, appear to be resistant to Red Palm Weevil infestations.

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Ron Vanderhoff

There has been some confusion about the appearance of the adult beetles discovered in Laguna Beach. Attached are photos taken by Don Hodel, Environmental Horticulturist of UC Cooperative Extension in L.A. These are of the actual Red Palm Weevils recovered in Laguna Beach a few weeks ago. It is a different color morph than the one in the Mediterranean and being shown in most of the media stories.

Per Mr. Hodel, this morph is said to originate from the eastern range of Rhynchophorus in Asia. The larval photo shows it on the "ball" of fibers that the pupa constructs in which to pupate, which was found near the center of the dead palm in Laguna Beach.

I am curious if any IPS members attended the meeting on Friday, Oct. 22 at UC Riverside to address RPW. A follow up meeting is scheduled for 2 p.m. this Friday, Oct. 29 at UCR. My worry is that these meetings have been poorly communicated. The location is also inconvenient, considering the infestation is in coastal Orange County.

This media release from yesterday will be of interest to anyone following this issue:

My link

Ron Vanderhoff

Newport Beachpost-5063-015606000 1288111271_thumb.jpgpost-5063-020551800 1288111356_thumb.jpg

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JungleGina

WHERE ARE THE NATURAL ENEMIES?

WHAT ARE THEY?

Getting a bit, well, you know . . .

Yeah, I know what you mean :hmm: I keep finding myself looking up into the tops of my palms. But we have 70 plus palms....

This is very depressing. I don't want to plant any more palms until we learn more or see what's going to happen.:(

Jackie

Natural enemies are all there really is in true pest control.

Nothing, NOTHING else matters.

Going crazy.

What are they doing in South East Asia? Aren't they (scientists) even looking?

While the bugs ravage?

I can't believe it.

Just can't.

Sure don't want to.

Dave from So-Cal: Check out page 6-9 of the article Hollywood Palms posted "Guidelines for Red Palm Weevil" for a list of specific biological controls, which includes some fungi, bacteria, and several bugs (hymenoptera, mites & nematodes). I agree that we shouldn't automatically turn to spraying chemicals in the air over large areas as a first resort, for anything.

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Mats

I am curious if any IPS members attended the meeting on Friday, Oct. 22 at UC Riverside to address RPW. A follow up meeting is scheduled for 2 p.m. this Friday, Oct. 29 at UCR. My worry is that these meetings have been poorly communicated. The location is also inconvenient, considering the infestation is in coastal Orange County.

This media release from yesterday will be of interest to anyone following this issue: My link

Thanks for the heads up Ron. And yes, their meetings are being poorly communicated to us homeowners / palm enthusiasts.

phoenixbob's second link here has great photos and a good synopsis of the situation.

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phoenixbob

Also, I do agree with Toby - that photo does not look like RPW - the shape is right but the coloration is all wrong.

It's now pretty clear that that is indeed the beetles found in California. As near as I can tell, the coloration is not diagnostic of the species - it is variable. It might help track down where these particular beetles came from though.

This page from the Florida Department of Agriculture has a diagnostic key for distinguishing and identifying the different species of palm weevil. The shape rather than the color seems to be of primary importance.

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Ron Vanderhoff

A few hours ago researchers within the UC system and CDFA confirmed at least one additional Red Palm Weevil detection in Laguna Beach and suggested the "probability" of more within the area. This is very bad news.

Community meetings, led by Ag officials, are in the planning, but no date has been published yet.

If you are interested in following this developing issue closely I suggest you check the following blog from UC Riverside frequently.My link

Ron

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DoomsDave

A few hours ago researchers within the UC system and CDFA confirmed at least one additional Red Palm Weevil detection in Laguna Beach and suggested the "probability" of more within the area. This is very bad news.

Community meetings, led by Ag officials, are in the planning, but no date has been published yet.

If you are interested in following this developing issue closely I suggest you check the following blog from UC Riverside frequently.My link

Ron

Thanks, I've bookmarked this page.

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Moose

A few hours ago researchers within the UC system and CDFA confirmed at least one additional Red Palm Weevil detection in Laguna Beach and suggested the "probability" of more within the area. This is very bad news.

Community meetings, led by Ag officials, are in the planning, but no date has been published yet.

If you are interested in following this developing issue closely I suggest you check the following blog from UC Riverside frequently.My link

Ron

:bummed::badday::bemused::violin:

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palmpuppy

What would be the reason for not removing the original dead tree?

Jackie

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Ron Vanderhoff

What would be the reason for not removing the original dead tree?

Jackie

The original tree WAS removed in late September. However, the discovery of another tree yesterday has not been removed yet. It also is infested with RPB. The tree is on private property and although it is essentially dead, the homeowner has not removed it yet. State officials cannot force the tree to be removed currently, but are suggesting it to the homeowner and they indicate that it might be removed by next week.

Ron

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Tom S

What would be the reason for not removing the original dead tree?

Jackie

The original tree WAS removed in late September. However, the discovery of another tree yesterday has not been removed yet. It also is infested with RPB. The tree is on private property and although it is essentially dead, the homeowner has not removed it yet. State officials cannot force the tree to be removed currently, but are suggesting it to the homeowner and they indicate that it might be removed by next week.

Ron

The new tree is about 100 yards from the other.

post-3340-009815100 1288233825_thumb.jpg

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mlovecan

Wow, that is a sad sight - that's the sight we say everyday in Southern Europe.

That tree is quite advanced. With all the work the agriculture department is doing, I am very surprised it took so long to find this second tree ( I assume the first one was not as far advanced ).

If the second tree is so far advanced, 100% there are many other nearby trees that are infected but showing no symptoms.

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Dypsisdean

I am very surprised it took so long to find this second tree.

I am too, considering it was only 100 yards from the original find. Perhaps the PalmTalk members in SoCal could get in touch with the Ag Dept. and set up a hot line to report suspicious trees. Since you guys are always looking at the palms anyway, you may be able to spot trouble before their limited staff can.

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Alberto

What would be the reason for not removing the original dead tree?

Jackie

The original tree WAS removed in late September. However, the discovery of another tree yesterday has not been removed yet. It also is infested with RPB. The tree is on private property and although it is essentially dead, the homeowner has not removed it yet. State officials cannot force the tree to be removed currently, but are suggesting it to the homeowner and they indicate that it might be removed by next week.

Ron

Waiting for the poor weevils can fly away..............

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Nigel

What would be the reason for not removing the original dead tree?

Jackie

The original tree WAS removed in late September. However, the discovery of another tree yesterday has not been removed yet. It also is infested with RPB. The tree is on private property and although it is essentially dead, the homeowner has not removed it yet. State officials cannot force the tree to be removed currently, but are suggesting it to the homeowner and they indicate that it might be removed by next week.

Ron

The new tree is about 100 yards from the other.

My god, talk about closing the stable door after the horse has bolted............ now you guys have a war to fight.

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gyuseppe

in total the are 2 phoenix canariensis death

My god, talk about closing the stable door after the horse has bolted..........

YES ! I'm sure many other red palms are in the canariensis, the problem is that you can not see from the outside :(

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Ron Vanderhoff

I can sense a certain amount of headless panic in this discussion. I think it would be good to review a few points:

- The RPW has been around for millions of years. Yet the native range of the RPW (Southeast Asia) is one of the most palm-rich regions on the planet.

- Areas where the RPW has been introduced many decades ago (Middle East, India) are not devoid of palms, to the contrary.

- The palm mainly affected in Europe is Phoenix canariensis. Other species do not seem to be affected in a major way.

- There are other, closely related Rhynchophorus species with a very similar life cycle naturally present in most parts of the tropics.

- Experience from the Canary Islands shows that the RPW can be eliminated with quick and sensible measures.

There is no suggestion that the RPW would eliminate all palms in a region. It is a shame about all those old P. canariensis being destroyed, but this is not the end of growing palms, just a major nuisance.

In the OC Register Article in the very first post of this thread, there is a picture:

post-1201-035585500 1287836114_thumb.jpg

Any guesses if this picture is of the actual bugs found in Laguna Beach or just some random picture from somewhere else? Judging by the ruler, it was taken in California, but the bug does not look like a RPW.

Best, TOBY

That's the actual weevil from the initial infestation.

Ron

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trioderob

so if the weevil does spread through southern california, what happens next ?

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Hollywood Palms

Short story on KPCC this morning, on The Madeleine Brand Show:

California Palm Trees Under Attack.

Mark Hoddle from UC Riverside is interviewed.

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Nigel

That's the actual weevil from the initial infestation.

Ron

Ron, looking at this dead tree later in the thread I would guess this weevil is not from the intitial infection but from a secondary infection which means its already spread and the net should be widened 2 times.

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mlovecan

That's the actual weevil from the initial infestation.

Ron

Ron, looking at this dead tree later in the thread I would guess this weevil is not from the intitial infection but from a secondary infection which means its already spread...

There's been no picture of the original. however the story was that a gardener discovered it while trimming - there would be no need to trim the second one.

From the canaries I have seen die over the years, the second tree has had it's crown fall over at least three or four months months ago - just observe the decay ouround the top of the tree. The trunk of that tree is solid mush now - just oozing with larvae and adult bugs.

That tree has yielded hundreds of adult RPW by now. At least the ag department knows what a completely RPW tree looks like now. I don't think they knew before.

You can sure bet more will be losing their crowns in the next 2 or 3 months. Very sorry to see that.

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trioderob

so the important thing is finding "ground zero"

the trees that were attacked were 20 years old

the weevil did not come from them.

it came from a much smaller palm that was planted somewhere near newport in the last year or so.

someone must have mail ordered an infected palm and planted it.

or could it have come from an area just north which has many cargo shipments ???????

the weevils then took to the air from that point.

did they spread out in all directions ?

did they follow the prevailing winds? (thats my guess - think they came from the north)

Edited by trioderob

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trioderob

where do I think ground zero is ?

here - just north of newport beach, the winds would fly them right into town:

HERE:

http://www.polb.com/about/default.asp

"Trade valued annually at more than $100 billion moves through Long Beach, making it the second-busiest seaport in the United States. Everything from clothing and shoes to toys, furniture and consumer electronics arrives at the Port before making its way to store shelves throughout the country. Specialized terminals also move petroleum, automobiles, cement, lumber, steel and other products. "

Edited by trioderob

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Ron Vanderhoff

To answer a few questions and address some issues in the past few posts. . .

Only two trees (Phoenix canariensis) have been confirmed to-date to have been infested with Red Palm Weevil so far. They are about three blocks from each other in northern Laguna Beach, CA. The first palm was removed in late September and it was during this removal that the discovery was made. There are no photos of this palm, but there are photos of the weevils found at the site, both adults and larvae. In fact, the image of an adult a few posts earlier was taken by Mr. Don Hodel and is from the site of this first discovery about six weeks ago.

On Tuesday of this week (Oct 26, 2010), a team of UC, County and State entomologists and experts determined another tree to be infested with Red Palm Weevils (the second tree). Although essentially dead, this tree is still standing and has a few remnant leaves still ringing the crown. I visited the tree yesterday and it is a very sad sight indeed. (I would post a picture or two of it if I could figure out how to add an image to this post or site).

I know IPS members are worried about this pest in North America. But to stand next to this dying palm, with its internal tissue completely eaten to a mushy pulp and see the devastation myself - it is quite humbling. While examining the collapsing palm, I could not avoid thinking that I am looking at one of the very first palms in North America to house this aggressive pest. I was thinking, I hope that ten years from today Phoenix canariensis and P. dactylifera are not absent from our California gardens and skylines, and I would look back on this iconic moment and think 'what if' we had ___________. Of course, I don't think we all know what the right thing to do is right now.

Continuing, this second tree has been infested for quite some time. I looked at aerial images from mid November 2009 and they indicate the tree was already quite distressed at that time. But, images from Feb 2008 show what appears to be a much healthier, greener tree. Of course, this is all circumstantial and not definitive information. Nonetheless, there is a very good possibility that this second tree was infested at some point from 2008 to mid 2009. Again, this is not certain, but in my opinion - probable.

Another question asked on this board is what was the source of the RPW's in this infestation? Nobody knows or likely ever will - the answer to this question would be trivia at this point anyway. This is an older, mature neighborhood and there are very few landscape palms being planted in the area. Secondly, mature imported palms reaching Laguna Beach from a region of the world with RPW is especially unlikely.

Next, CDFA has installed and is monitoring about 250 pheromone traps in a nine square mile area surrounding these two RPW discoveries. To date, no additional weevils have been captured in these traps.

So the issue is a bit confusing at the moment. Here's the quandary: It appears that at least one palm has been infested with RPW for possibly over a year and maybe as long as two years. Assuming RPW's can produce three generations per year (unconfirmed in CA, but reasonable) then the adults from this infested palm would have travelled to additional palms in the area by now, infested those tree and moved on to even more palms. The RPW population would expand exponentially. However, no adults RPW's have been trapped in any of the 250 bucket traps.

On another note, CDFA, USDA and UC groups have called an informational meeting for next Friday at 2:00 PM at the Laguna Beach City Hall. The meeting is directed to arborists, municipal staff and plant protection personnel. Future meetings will be directed to citizens and other interested groups.

Finally, a suggestion . . .

I would hope that IPS and its members offer their complete assistance to UC, CDFA and USDA in their efforts toward RPW in Laguna Beach. IPS should be a strategic ally in this campaign. Education, detection, public workshops, media communications and more should be offered to these agencies. Panic and misinformation won't be helpful and may exacerbate the problem. The IPS/Palm Society of Southern California should step up quickly, perhaps an ad hoc committee be formed, volunteers and commitments secured and their services offered. This is the real deal.

Ron

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Mats

.

Ron wrote another article on the Red Palm Weevil in his weekly Daily Pilot column that can be found HERE.

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Tomas

The height of adult plants causes difficulty for any action and generates high costs that induce individuals to take no action.

This is the most cost effective device I know about. A telescopic pole in carbon fiber or aluminum to reach the crown and that can support a nozzle to spray the foliage or a microphone for acoustic detection.

http://giardinaggio.irrigazioneimpianti.com/wp-content/uploads/Sistemiperiltrattamentoaereodellepalmeco_B564/image_3.png

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palmazon

just to keep this thread on top -

we had this discussion back in February '08

weevils wobble & palms fall down

here's another article linked to the aforementioned thread

Red Palm Weevil Redux

Standby for an update in the SoCal Palm Society Journal

(expertly written, w/out any Gadzooks! or Mommy!)

Spread the word & support your local palm society

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