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Red Palm weevils found in Laguna Beach, CA

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Cristóbal

More information about palm # 2 in Tijuana.

They call to me from the fish store yesterday to tell to me they find the eggs of the weevil by the palm, but no weevils. Today I go there and they give these to me:

post-285-038154200 1332827891_thumb.jpg

2 eggs, they are closed 100%. There are weevils in the inside !

I want open them but I think it is more better send email to Mark and Christine Hoddle to ask to them what they think is the best things to do.

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MattyB

That tree needs to be destroyed immediately!

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Jason Baker Portugal

There are infected CIDP everywhere here in central and north Portugal. I hope they keep on chewing only the CIDP because I have very few of them (roebelini). The countryside will certainly look diferent without those Phoenix.

Cheers

Jason

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Charles Wychgel

There are infected CIDP everywhere here in central and north Portugal. I hope they keep on chewing only the CIDP because I have very few of them (roebelini).

Take heed Jason the list they chew is getting longer everyday, this one is from 2010

Red Palm Weevil - Presently-known hosts. (11 November 2010)

1. Areca catechu Betel nut Palm

2. Arenga saccharifera Sugar Palm

3. A. pinnata Sugar Palm

4. Bismarckia nobilis Bismarck Palm

5. Borassus flabellifer Toddy Palm

6. B. sp Palmyra Palm

7. Brahea armata Mexican Blue Palm, etc.

8. B. edulis Guadalupe Palm

9. Butia capitata Wine Palm, etc.

10. Calamus merrillii Rattan Palm

11. Caryota cumingii Philippines Fishtail Palm

12. C. maxima Giant mountain fishtail Palm

13. Cocos nucifera Coconut

14. Corypha utan (= C. gebanga, C. elata) Gebang Palm

15. C. umbraculifera Talipot Palm

16. Chamæerops humilis European Fan Palm

17. Elæis guineensis Oil Palm

18. Livistona australis Australian Fan Palm

19. L. decipiens Ribbon fan Palm

20. L. chinensis Chinese fan Palm

21. L. saribus (= L. cochinchinensis) Serdang Palm

22. L. subglobosa

23. Metroxylon sagu Sago Palm

24. Oncosperma horrida Nibong Palm

25. O. tigillarium Nibong Palm

26. Phœnix canariensis Canary Island Date Palm

27. P. dactylifera Date Palm

28. P. roebelinii Pygmy Date Palm

29. P. theophrastii Cretan Palm

30. P. sylvestris Indian Date Palm

31. Pritchardia pacifica Fiji Palm

32. P. hillebrandii Molokai Fan Palm, etc.

33. Ravenea rivularis Majesty Palm

34. Roystonea regia Royal Palm

35. Sabal umbraculifera Hispaniolan Palmetto

36. Trachycarpus fortunei Chusan Palm

37. Washingtonia filifera California Fan Palm

38. W. robusta Mexican Fan Palm.

Syagrus romanzoffianum if injured

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Cristóbal

I have email from Christine and Mark Hoddle. They asked to me, to open the cocoons and to put them in the frezer what I find for when they come to Tijuana again. Now they are not in north america, but soon they come here for them to take to USA for analises of DNA.

I can now confirm this palm # 2 is dead from rhynchophorus palmarum. NOT red palm weevil, but black palm weevil. Same very bad news for this area.

Here are the fotos.

MATTYB: You are right this palm needs be cut very soon, i put this in email for Christine and Mark, to ask to them to confirm this with the federal and tijuana governments, to cut this palm and destroy NOW. They are in contact with these governments of this problem.

FOTO # 1 - the cocoons, before i cut them.

post-285-080456200 1333345891_thumb.jpg

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Cristóbal

FOTO # 2 - I open the cocoon and find weevil number 1.

post-285-079704800 1333346199_thumb.jpg

FOTO # 3 - Weevil number 1, is dead.

post-285-049006200 1333346256_thumb.jpg

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Cristóbal

FOTO # 4 - I open cocoon # 2. Again i find one weevil.

post-285-029663700 1333346373_thumb.jpg

FOTO # 5 - The 2 weevils. Both are dead.

post-285-056080900 1333346436_thumb.jpg

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Cristóbal

FOTO # 6 - The 2 weevils from close. Yes, they are rhynchophorus palmarum.

California USA, be very careful. If they are here, they are there. One can walk from where is this palm, to USA.

post-285-012225800 1333346626_thumb.jpg

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Phoenikakias

There are infected CIDP everywhere here in central and north Portugal. I hope they keep on chewing only the CIDP because I have very few of them (roebelini).

Take heed Jason the list they chew is getting longer everyday, this one is from 2010

Red Palm Weevil - Presently-known hosts. (11 November 2010)

1. Areca catechu Betel nut Palm

2. Arenga saccharifera Sugar Palm

3. A. pinnata Sugar Palm

4. Bismarckia nobilis Bismarck Palm

5. Borassus flabellifer Toddy Palm

6. B. sp Palmyra Palm

7. Brahea armata Mexican Blue Palm, etc.

8. B. edulis Guadalupe Palm

9. Butia capitata Wine Palm, etc.

10. Calamus merrillii Rattan Palm

11. Caryota cumingii Philippines Fishtail Palm

12. C. maxima Giant mountain fishtail Palm

13. Cocos nucifera Coconut

14. Corypha utan (= C. gebanga, C. elata) Gebang Palm

15. C. umbraculifera Talipot Palm

16. Chamæerops humilis European Fan Palm

17. Elæis guineensis Oil Palm

18. Livistona australis Australian Fan Palm

19. L. decipiens Ribbon fan Palm

20. L. chinensis Chinese fan Palm

21. L. saribus (= L. cochinchinensis) Serdang Palm

22. L. subglobosa

23. Metroxylon sagu Sago Palm

24. Oncosperma horrida Nibong Palm

25. O. tigillarium Nibong Palm

26. Phœnix canariensis Canary Island Date Palm

27. P. dactylifera Date Palm

28. P. roebelinii Pygmy Date Palm

29. P. theophrastii Cretan Palm

30. P. sylvestris Indian Date Palm

31. Pritchardia pacifica Fiji Palm

32. P. hillebrandii Molokai Fan Palm, etc.

33. Ravenea rivularis Majesty Palm

34. Roystonea regia Royal Palm

35. Sabal umbraculifera Hispaniolan Palmetto

36. Trachycarpus fortunei Chusan Palm

37. Washingtonia filifera California Fan Palm

38. W. robusta Mexican Fan Palm.

Syagrus romanzoffianum if injured

I add Butia capitata. I' ve found an rpw (dead because I take precaution measures) inside a leaf base during pruning.

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Phoenikakias

There are infected CIDP everywhere here in central and north Portugal. I hope they keep on chewing only the CIDP because I have very few of them (roebelini).

Take heed Jason the list they chew is getting longer everyday, this one is from 2010

Red Palm Weevil - Presently-known hosts. (11 November 2010)

1. Areca catechu Betel nut Palm

2. Arenga saccharifera Sugar Palm

3. A. pinnata Sugar Palm

4. Bismarckia nobilis Bismarck Palm

5. Borassus flabellifer Toddy Palm

6. B. sp Palmyra Palm

7. Brahea armata Mexican Blue Palm, etc.

8. B. edulis Guadalupe Palm

9. Butia capitata Wine Palm, etc.

10. Calamus merrillii Rattan Palm

11. Caryota cumingii Philippines Fishtail Palm

12. C. maxima Giant mountain fishtail Palm

13. Cocos nucifera Coconut

14. Corypha utan (= C. gebanga, C. elata) Gebang Palm

15. C. umbraculifera Talipot Palm

16. Chamæerops humilis European Fan Palm

17. Elæis guineensis Oil Palm

18. Livistona australis Australian Fan Palm

19. L. decipiens Ribbon fan Palm

20. L. chinensis Chinese fan Palm

21. L. saribus (= L. cochinchinensis) Serdang Palm

22. L. subglobosa

23. Metroxylon sagu Sago Palm

24. Oncosperma horrida Nibong Palm

25. O. tigillarium Nibong Palm

26. Phœnix canariensis Canary Island Date Palm

27. P. dactylifera Date Palm

28. P. roebelinii Pygmy Date Palm

29. P. theophrastii Cretan Palm

30. P. sylvestris Indian Date Palm

31. Pritchardia pacifica Fiji Palm

32. P. hillebrandii Molokai Fan Palm, etc.

33. Ravenea rivularis Majesty Palm

34. Roystonea regia Royal Palm

35. Sabal umbraculifera Hispaniolan Palmetto

36. Trachycarpus fortunei Chusan Palm

37. Washingtonia filifera California Fan Palm

38. W. robusta Mexican Fan Palm.

Syagrus romanzoffianum if injured

I add Butia capitata. I' ve found an rpw (dead because I take precaution measures) inside a leaf base during pruning.

I forgot in previous thread to add also Pritchardia lowreyana aka macrocarpa. I do it now for the same as above reason.

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WestCoastGal

Cristobal, your reports and photos are always so memorable. Do I understand you correctly in that the weevils were both found dead in their cocoons before being put in the freezer? If so, I wonder why they died before emerging. Bad news that they are there and clearly responsible for taking out that palm but good news that at least those two didn't survive to emerge and travel to another palm.

Edited by WestCoastGal

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MattyB

I wonder if our cold winter weather has killed them? Are they sleeping? Maybe this is good news that they might not thrive here because we are not so tropical.....wishful thinking maybe.

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fdrc65

Bad news from Sicilia (Sicily Italy) too

5194173525_09b14c2926.jpg

DSCF5392.jpg

Edited by fdrc65

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Phoenikakias

I wonder if our cold winter weather has killed them? Are they sleeping? Maybe this is good news that they might not thrive here because we are not so tropical.....wishful thinking maybe.

Matt, bad news I bring to you. RPW survives outside the palm till 5C, but inside the palm can withstand much lower temps due to the increased temperature because of the fermentation produced from destroyed tissues.

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trioderob
Palmetto_Weevil_Grubs.JPG Edited by trioderob

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LJG

Rob, why not explain your post. Where is this? What is this in regards too? It helps for the hundreds that follow this thread.

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trioderob

the photo shows what one of those weevil grub attacks can do to a Bizzie.

was a little shocked at how bad it can be

(more than a little)

in this case its The "palmetto weevil" (Rhynchophorus cruentatus)

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LJG

the photo shows what one of those weevil grub attacks can do to a Bizzie.

was a little shocked at how bad it can be

(more than a little)

in this case its The "palmetto weevil" (Rhynchophorus cruentatus)

Thanks. So Florida for this picture.

You can see why trees die so fast with infestation.

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Phoenikakias

And you will find out unfortunately, how quickly palm growing turns to a hobby exclusively for rich people, when the rpw or a similiar borer spreads to a another climate zone without natural enemies.

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Cristóbal

Cristobal, your reports and photos are always so memorable. Do I understand you correctly in that the weevils were both found dead in their cocoons before being put in the freezer? If so, I wonder why they died before emerging. Bad news that they are there and clearly responsible for taking out that palm but good news that at least those two didn't survive to emerge and travel to another palm.

WESTCOASTGAL, the persons in the fish store, they put the cocoons in the refrigerator with fish before they give them to me. I do not know if they were dead before, but obvious if they are in the refrigerator for long time the cold there kill the weevils.

I wonder if our cold winter weather has killed them? Are they sleeping? Maybe this is good news that they might not thrive here because we are not so tropical.....wishful thinking maybe.

MATTYB, the first palm i find in december 2010, i do not think it is some problem for them to survive here now that i find palm # 2. The palms are in the downtown of tijuana and not far from the ocean, I do not think in any night of the winter it is more colder then 4-5C.

I have email from Christine Hoddle she says the federal government of USA is worryed about the weevil but the federal government of Mexico thinks it is not some problem ! How many palms are to die from this here and also in USA in the next years, because of this wrong attitude ?

It is important to remember this is black palm weevil, not red palm weevil. But it does same thing.

Edited by Cristóbal

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Hammer

Pardon my lack of knowledge, but what is the difference between the red and black species? Or does it even matter for us palm lovers in this part of the world?

In their native habitat, what checks their spread and growth?

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Enzo

Hi,

in addition to the passion for the palms, are Doctor Agronomist and Forestry.

I'm raising awareness and helping (free) some municipalities around where I live.

I would like to ask you some questions about how it intervenes in the United States:

- someone is using a preventive IMIDACLOPRID on the ground?

- which preventive treatments are realized?

- in case of infestation of an exemplary which active principles (imidacloprid, clorpirifos,....) are used?

Sorry for my english

Thanks in advance

  • Upvote 2

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DoomsDave

Enzo!

Nice to meet you.

We do use imidacloprid here.

Cristobal's reports are truly alarming.

sigh

Let's arrange our deck chairs on the Titanic?

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Brahea Axel

Bump! Since the topic has come up again. What size of palms can be infected?

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picudodelapalma

En México el problema es muy grave y continua afectando la industria del coco de agua para fruta asi como las grandes plantaciones de palmas en zonas hoteleras en el Pacifico y Caribe mexicano. Tenemos trabajando con esta plaga desde hace aproximadamente 10 años y en el estado de Chiapas iniciamos proyectos de capacitacion sobre la plaga que ataca la palma de aceitera para produccion de biodiesel, usamos metodo de trampeo con feromonas sexuales e inyectores de alta presión al tronco en la base del cogollo donde se encuentra infestado de pequeñas larvas del picudo y en un periodo de 4 a 6 meses aproximados dependiendo del grado de daño manifestado por las larvas sera su recuperacion.

Ve nuestros resultados en la siguiente pagina :

http://controlmayateprieto.webs.com/

post-7911-0-36802200-1374593989_thumb.jp

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Kostas

Dont hope that cold keeps the Rhynchophorus ferrugineus in check,it doesnt. They thrive here in cold Melissia even though it snows annually and we get freezing nights for many days in a row with snow. Annual lows at least -3C.

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Phoenikakias

It looks like that larvae and cocoons have enough protection from cold in the interior of the palms, where temps are much higher than in the air because of the ongoing fermentation caused by larval excrements. (the therapy protocol for infected palms suggests also the use of fungicide). Nature finds a way...

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PÚA

Also Predates in Parajubaea Torallyi Torallyi

Púa

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Justin

Yes, awesome video, thank you for sharing. That guy had a really interesting Riverside accent. :winkie:

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trioderob

any updates?

any updates ????

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Ron Vanderhoff

CA Dept. of Food and Ag have been trapping the entire area for a few years now, but have not found any more following the initial discoveries. 

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Ferry

The weevil discovered in Laguna Beach was not Rhynchophorus ferrugineus but R. vulneratus. This last specie, as R. palmarum, is far less invasive than R. ferrugineus in urban areas with Phoenix canariensis. This palm specie constitutes an extraordinary weak host of the RPW. This explains why the situation in Laguna Beach has been so easy to control compare with places invaded by R. ferrugineus where furthermore wrong measures of control have been adopted.  

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BS Man about Palms

Bump for interested parties

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Jdiaz31089

Hmm, after reading through the many pages here and seeing pictures, I'm wondering if this has affected palms in the San Joaquin Valley... 

I remember seeing palms show these symptoms (collapsing crown, no new growth). There was a particular, century-old P. canariensis in Los Banos at Espana's Restaurant that showed these symptoms, slowly declining over several months. I thought it was a goner, but much to my surprise, it recovered and now has a full crown. I saw another along Robertson Blvd in Chowchilla, again century-old canariensis, go into decline. over several months with no new growth. That one too recovered after about a year of being in decline. 

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PalmTreeDude

Do any birds eat these things? 

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