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Tom S

Red Palm weevils found in Laguna Beach, CA

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MattyB

Any updates? It's warm now and if the weevils are still around they should be flying. Let's hope we have some good news.

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Cristóbal

There is no news of these weevils ?

The red and the black ?

One year ago California is in panic of this, now I dont read any thing of the weevils.

They are controled, eliminated ?

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phoenixbob

I think the CISR Blog is the best place for news, apart from this thread.

This was posted just a couple of weeks ago:

http://cisr.ucr.edu/...he-philippines/

They're testing pheromone traps for the variety of RPW found in Laguna Beach to see if they work there. The RPWs found in Laguna seem closer to ones found in the Philippines to those found in the Middle East or Europe, so they wanted to do a test on those. Conclusion - the pheromone traps may not work well. Hmmm, bad news. There may be more of them out there than we can find.

This was the best summary of the situation, but it was from July 24:

http://cisr.ucr.edu/...-perfect-storm/

"...These traps have failed to capture adult RPW. Visual ground inspections of palms in Laguna Beach have identified trees potentially infested with RPW. One palm was inspected on 25 May 2011 and physical inspection confirmed feeding damage from RPW, but NO live RPW were found. This palm was treated with insecticides. On 2 June 2011, a second palm displaying symptoms of RPW damage was inspected physically. Again, feeding damage was confirmed but NO live RPW were detected. This palm was also treated with insecticides."

"In December 2010 reports were received from palm enthusiasts in Tijuana Mexico of dying Canary Islands palms and these moribund palms were displaying symptoms similar to that expected from a RPW infestation. Physical inspection confirmed the presence of live palm weevils in at least one palm, and this weevil was officially identified at Rhynchophorus palmarum, the South American palm weevil (SAPW)...."

(Thanks Cristobal!!!)

"...Following the discovery of SAPW in Tijuana, the CDFA commenced a monitoring program in San Ysidro in San Diego County (California USA) in March 2011. The area under surveillance with traps baited with SAPW aggregation pheromone is close to the USA-Mexico border. Mexican collaborators have also deployed SAPW pheromone traps in Tijuana to monitor for this pest. Monitoring efforts have trapped adult male and female SAPW weevils in San Ysidro and Tijuana that flew into traps in response to aggregation pheromone. So far no infested palm trees have been found in the San Ysidro area. Consequently, it is difficult to determine whether or not SAPW has breeding populations in San Diego County as pheromone traps may simply be catching SAPW dispersing from Tijuana into Southern California. This situation is being monitored very closely by the CDFA and the USDA."

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Nigel

I am confused because i thought it was RPW identified in california and now it is SAPW.

If it is SAPW I think it is easier to deal with because i suspect it is not so aggressive.

Here you can find old phoenix that have survived many many decades together with SAPW. However, in transplanting mature phoenix for landscape projects you can often find attacked palms.

I think if it was equally as aggressive as the RPW it would have attacked all those healthy old phoenix long ago because it is a native pest that is always present.

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DALION

Is a systemic insecticide beneficial for people put on there palms or is that just overkill for this situation? I have used Orthene on my Cycas when I had Asian Scale (Aulacaspis yasumatsui) from an infected cycad I bought from a less than reputable nursery. It killed the scale on the cycad and all the ants that usually patrolled the surroundings of the cycad vanished for for two years. So I don't want to kill beneficial insects just to potentially kill palm weevils that may or not be around.

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DoomsDave

Is a systemic insecticide beneficial for people put on there palms or is that just overkill for this situation? I have used Orthene on my Cycas when I had Asian Scale (Aulacaspis yasumatsui) from an infected cycad I bought from a less than reputable nursery. It killed the scale on the cycad and all the ants that usually patrolled the surroundings of the cycad vanished for for two years. So I don't want to kill beneficial insects just to potentially kill palm weevils that may or not be around.

That's the $64,000 question.

And, the answer depends on how likely you are to get infested.

In Italy, Sicily, etc., get the bug killer, if you've still got a nice palm you care about.

Here, it appears that the initial infestation around Laguna Beach has been annihilated, but I think that caution is in order, particularly for anyone nearby, which Yorba Linda really isn't.

Vigilance and observation are key, but they're not easy with a pest like this. As you probably already know, by the time visible symptoms of infestation appear, particularly on a large palm, it's often too late to save the plant. Worst of all, few natural enemies control the weevils, though there must be some out there.

You're right to be very concerned. It wouldn't be so bad if palms didn't take so long to grow. The palm weevil also attacks sugar cane, by the way.

Also, by the way, there are plugs and implants you can use on big plants, which makes treatment a heck of a lot easier than spraying sky-high crowns. It will also lessen harm to beneficial insects. Orthene (acephate) has apparently been banned in California, but imolocoprid (not sure about spelling) appears to be a good alternative.

Some have expressed the belief that the Laguna Beach infestation has been vanquished, and the optimistic side of me desperately wants to believe that. There are some facts to support that conclusion, but I don't feel safe betting on it. The obvious problem is that if they got to Laguna Beach before, who's to say they won't end up in a place like say, Santa Monica, where control will be much more difficult?

So, everyone, keep your eyes peeled for large black and red beetles buzzing around your palms, and if you find any that look like the RPW, catch them, and call Ag, fast. (And, the rest of us, since 100 barking chihuahuas get more attention than just one. :lol: )

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phoenixbob

I am confused because i thought it was RPW identified in california and now it is SAPW.

If it is SAPW I think it is easier to deal with because i suspect it is not so aggressive.

Here you can find old phoenix that have survived many many decades together with SAPW. However, in transplanting mature phoenix for landscape projects you can often find attacked palms.

I think if it was equally as aggressive as the RPW it would have attacked all those healthy old phoenix long ago because it is a native pest that is always present.

RPW was what was found in Laguna Beach, California. Then this thread started, and people started looking around. See page 10 of this thread, post #386 and onward, where Cristobal first found the SAPW infected Phoenix canariensis in Tijuana, Mexico. Page 11, #410, is where he showed the pictures of the SAPWs he found at the site. This very thread is where the discovery and first identification of SAPW in Tijuana happened - it's worth going back and reading that.

We have both RPW and SAPW finds in the general area now, RPW in Laguna Beach and SAPW in Tijuana, Mexico.

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DALION

That's the $64,000 question.

For some of the gardens that I've seen here $64,000 barely covers the front yard.

Orthene (acephate) has apparently been banned in California, but imolocoprid (not sure about spelling) appears to be a good alternative.

I bought Orthene from the Orange County Farm Supply in June so don't know when it was banned or if you need to give up a copy of your drivers license.

I don't know when or if I'll get that little bugger but I have a (spray)gun and am not afraid to use it.

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DoomsDave

That's the $64,000 question.

For some of the gardens that I've seen here $64,000 barely covers the front yard.

Orthene (acephate) has apparently been banned in California, but imolocoprid (not sure about spelling) appears to be a good alternative.

I bought Orthene from the Orange County Farm Supply in June so don't know when it was banned or if you need to give up a copy of your drivers license.

I don't know when or if I'll get that little bugger but I have a (spray)gun and am not afraid to use it.

Orthene was banned a while back.

I managed to get a bit from a place in Buena Park, and that's all there was.

All Imlocoprid now.

Get more of the O-t if you want it . . .

SMells horrible, but it works

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Nigel

RPW was what was found in Laguna Beach, California. Then this thread started, and people started looking around. See page 10 of this thread, post #386 and onward, where Cristobal first found the SAPW infected Phoenix canariensis in Tijuana, Mexico. Page 11, #410, is where he showed the pictures of the SAPWs he found at the site. This very thread is where the discovery and first identification of SAPW in Tijuana happened - it's worth going back and reading that.

We have both RPW and SAPW finds in the general area now, RPW in Laguna Beach and SAPW in Tijuana, Mexico.

Ok sorry. If you look at Uruguay and Argentina where there is huge numbers of mature phoenix living together with SAPW then I think perhaps also it always was in mexico together with phoenix? Maybe california too? Is their evidence to suggest SAPW is equal to RPW in terms of destructiveness ? In Florida you have a native palm weevil that occasionally attacks phoenix and other palms but its not aggressive like RPW. I would suggest SAPW and your native PW are not the big problem.

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Tom S

I saw one of the AG inspectors on his route today, and asked if he had seen anything. He told me no infestations had been found since the beginning, but that they should be continuing there work for a long time. He said palms are big business so a lot of resources are dedicated to this.

He had a real genuine interest in palms, and said. "I love my job, I get to drive around a beautiful town looking at palm trees." I asked him for an employment application...

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phoenixbob

RPW was what was found in Laguna Beach, California. Then this thread started, and people started looking around. See page 10 of this thread, post #386 and onward, where Cristobal first found the SAPW infected Phoenix canariensis in Tijuana, Mexico. Page 11, #410, is where he showed the pictures of the SAPWs he found at the site. This very thread is where the discovery and first identification of SAPW in Tijuana happened - it's worth going back and reading that.

We have both RPW and SAPW finds in the general area now, RPW in Laguna Beach and SAPW in Tijuana, Mexico.

Ok sorry. If you look at Uruguay and Argentina where there is huge numbers of mature phoenix living together with SAPW then I think perhaps also it always was in mexico together with phoenix? Maybe california too? Is their evidence to suggest SAPW is equal to RPW in terms of destructiveness ? In Florida you have a native palm weevil that occasionally attacks phoenix and other palms but its not aggressive like RPW. I would suggest SAPW and your native PW are not the big problem.

SAPW was never found in this part of Mexico or California (US) before Cristobal found it. There had been a prior report from Baja California Sur (also part of Mexico, but an area hundreds of miles away), but this was the first report near this area.

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DoomsDave

RPW was what was found in Laguna Beach, California. Then this thread started, and people started looking around. See page 10 of this thread, post #386 and onward, where Cristobal first found the SAPW infected Phoenix canariensis in Tijuana, Mexico. Page 11, #410, is where he showed the pictures of the SAPWs he found at the site. This very thread is where the discovery and first identification of SAPW in Tijuana happened - it's worth going back and reading that.

We have both RPW and SAPW finds in the general area now, RPW in Laguna Beach and SAPW in Tijuana, Mexico.

Ok sorry. If you look at Uruguay and Argentina where there is huge numbers of mature phoenix living together with SAPW then I think perhaps also it always was in mexico together with phoenix? Maybe california too? Is their evidence to suggest SAPW is equal to RPW in terms of destructiveness ? In Florida you have a native palm weevil that occasionally attacks phoenix and other palms but its not aggressive like RPW. I would suggest SAPW and your native PW are not the big problem.

I suspect that the native bugs have native enemies lurking effectively to at least keep them from getting totally out of hand.

I'll just make a bit of a leap here and note that might be the case in teh homeland of RPW, as well. Perhaps the same natural enemies that prey on native weevils in South America and Mexico and Florida might also prey on RPW.

JUst a thought and a prayer . . .

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Nigel

SAPW was never found in this part of Mexico or California (US) before Cristobal found it. There had been a prior report from Baja California Sur (also part of Mexico, but an area hundreds of miles away), but this was the first report near this area.

I just looked it up on the net and it gives the natural range of SAPW as being from Argentina up to southern mexico, so I guess it was never that far away. Maybe the climate is the limiting factor on the range of this pest ?

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Cristóbal

Tonight a friend sended to me this foto from today of this phoenix canariensis in the downtown of Tijuana.

I think this also has rhynchophorus palmarum i can go monday to see it.

post-285-063022900 1326428234_thumb.jpg

This is the palm before in google earth. I think the pescadería (store for fish) needs to change the name soon.

post-285-053386900 1326428259_thumb.jpg

You can see it is not far only 500 meters from the old palm, the first palm where i find rynchophorus palmarum. If you know Tijuana you can see it is more close to Revolución, on Avenida Negrete by 9 and 10 Streets.

post-285-020097600 1326428330_thumb.jpg

Edited by Cristóbal

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MattyB

awwwwww man! Keep us updated Cristobal.

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dimitris

Here in Greece the 80% of phoenix canariensis palms are already dead or near death . Unfortunately the first years red weevil came to Greece there was lack on information about it , it said that there wasn't any hope for infected palms and they should moved and destroyed , that NEVER happened because the cost was huge , then some companies import some huge vehicles producing microwaves , that was showing some good results but need to pay 400€ for each palm tree !!! Finaly prooved that you can kill red wevill just using ordinary chemicals used to agriculture ! it is so sad to see so many giants die like that . The worst thing about wevill is that doesn' t stop to the phoenix canariensis and phoenix genera only , unfortunatelly i have seen attacks in washingtonias , livistonas , syagrus , chamaerops and brahea palms and they were all in my garden.likely after quick notice of signs and the right treature there are all recover and growing like nothing happens !

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DoomsDave

Here in Greece the 80% of phoenix canariensis palms are already dead or near death . Unfortunately the first years red weevil came to Greece there was lack on information about it , it said that there wasn't any hope for infected palms and they should moved and destroyed , that NEVER happened because the cost was huge , then some companies import some huge vehicles producing microwaves , that was showing some good results but need to pay 400€ for each palm tree !!! Finaly prooved that you can kill red wevill just using ordinary chemicals used to agriculture ! it is so sad to see so many giants die like that . The worst thing about wevill is that doesn' t stop to the phoenix canariensis and phoenix genera only , unfortunatelly i have seen attacks in washingtonias , livistonas , syagrus , chamaerops and brahea palms and they were all in my garden.likely after quick notice of signs and the right treature there are all recover and growing like nothing happens !

So sad to hear!

Any pictures, articles?

I've got a bad feeling that this issue won't go away here in Cali, however desperately we hope.

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dimitris

Here in Greece the 80% of phoenix canariensis palms are already dead or near death . Unfortunately the first years red weevil came to Greece there was lack on information about it , it said that there wasn't any hope for infected palms and they should moved and destroyed , that NEVER happened because the cost was huge , then some companies import some huge vehicles producing microwaves , that was showing some good results but need to pay 400€ for each palm tree !!! Finaly prooved that you can kill red wevill just using ordinary chemicals used to agriculture ! it is so sad to see so many giants die like that . The worst thing about wevill is that doesn' t stop to the phoenix canariensis and phoenix genera only , unfortunatelly i have seen attacks in washingtonias , livistonas , syagrus , chamaerops and brahea palms and they were all in my garden.likely after quick notice of signs and the right treature there are all recover and growing like nothing happens !

So sad to hear!

Any pictures, articles?

I've got a bad feeling that this issue won't go away here in Cali, however desperately we hope.

Here are some pictures , post-6446-087943400 1326656312_thumb.jpe

those aren't lucky enough to survive !

the system with the microwaves i told you , post-6446-051546800 1326656332_thumb.jpg

red weevil killed this washingtonia robusta ,post-6446-041215800 1326655850_thumb.jpg

and some photos that prove you can save your palms if you notice in time the infection and treated right , post-6446-085420800 1326655882_thumb.jpg post-6446-013552100 1326656502_thumb.jpe

you can see that from the center of the trunk emerge the new growth , the leaves are very short at the start but the following comes larger and larger , it takes some months for the plant to recover !

The most important is the prompt removal of diseased plants . plants in no case should be burned because this method has no effect, the insect don't die , because of the heat insects leaving the tree and spread over long distances. palm should be covered with nylon or some kind of net cut from the base and buried at 1,6 meter depth .

i don't know how to translate the kind of chemical that we use here but i tell you the brand name , is the "confidor" by bayer .

Red weevil is deadly for the palms who haven't owners take care about them , and i don't believe that anyone of them is here !!!

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Ferry

Various companies and researchers have seen in the disaster created worldwide by the red palm weevil an opportunity to make money or to get prestige. They have hyped up new miraculous solution based on the technology or the narrow scientific specialty that they control but without any knowledge on palms, on the red palm weevil and on the specific global context in which the battle takes place. For a short while, some of them have obtained some success but very quickly it has appeared that they proposed solution was totally inefficient, inapplicable and too costly in the field.

The main serious consequence of such irresponsible propaganda is the apparition of a first myth: the myth of a technological miraculous solution to control the red palm weevil. As these solutions have failed one after the other, the second myth presently very common is that more research is necessary to find a solution to combat the RPW. It constitutes a dramatic mistake that leads politicians to passivity and defeatism.

For more than 30 years for oil palm and coconut plantation and for more than 4 years for ornamental palms in town, we know that the success in the fight against the RPW is linked to the right implementation of a well known integrated strategy based on awareness, training, early detection (quite simple with Phoenix canariensis), sanitation, preventive treatments.

Many mistakes regarding the biology of pest and the palms, based on the first papers published on this pest, must also be urgently rectified. They have been repeated without been reevaluated and constitute presently catastrophic clichés. The 2010 USDA new pest response guidelines for RPW that I have completely reviewed at the demand of various officials, contained most of these seriously erroneous clichés.

Various papers have been published recently to rectify these mistakes. Between these mistakes, I will quote three in relation with the treatment of the second infested palm detected in Laguna Beach:

- injection treatment of this Phoenix canariensis has been applied as if palms were trees.

- inspection by cutting only the outer mature fronds to detect early the weevil is useless. Deep inspection windows that reach the still closed central fronds is indispensable for early detection.

- imidacloprid has been used and is still proposed in soil or palm injection when its efficiency persistency is very short (less than two months). We are working for many years on the issue of persistency and injection technique because we consider that they are key issues to win the fight in urban environment. We have established that two molecules are much more persistent than imidacloprid and that a very simple and cheap technique can be used to “inject” the products. Based on these results, injection as part of the preventive treatment in an integrated eradication strategy costs (all expenses included) only few Euros per year and per palm.

To conclude, we have established more than 4 years ago how to save infested palms in a very simple way although specific training is necessary to realize well this operation. It is part of theory and practical training courses that we are giving to plant protection technicians, municipalities and enterprises trimmers on the integrated strategy to eradicate the RPW. More than 200 trimmers have already been trained in France, Spain, Italy. We will organize this year training in Israel, Portugal and Turkey.

I send here attached a spectacular photo of palms that have been sanitized and had recovered.

Best regards.

Michel Ferry

post-5029-085155300 1326705480_thumb.jpg

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LJG

Michel, what are the two "molecules" you speak of?

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Ferry

For one of them, thiametoxam, we have already published two papers: Estévez A., Ferry M., Gómez S., 2011. Endotherapy in palms. Study of the efficiency and persistency of thiametoxam in preventive treatments against the red palm weevil. Phytoma, 226, 42-48 and Gómez S., Estévez A., Olmos M., Ferry M., 2011. Development of a new method to evaluate efficiency and persistency of active substances used by endotherapy in adult palms for the control of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus Olivier. VII National Congress of Applied Entomology. Baeza 24-28/10/2011. Book of Abstracts.

For the other one, various papers will be publsished soon. I will keep you informed.

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LJG

For one of them, thiametoxam, we have already published two papers: Estévez A., Ferry M., Gómez S., 2011. Endotherapy in palms. Study of the efficiency and persistency of thiametoxam in preventive treatments against the red palm weevil. Phytoma, 226, 42-48 and Gómez S., Estévez A., Olmos M., Ferry M., 2011. Development of a new method to evaluate efficiency and persistency of active substances used by endotherapy in adult palms for the control of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus Olivier. VII National Congress of Applied Entomology. Baeza 24-28/10/2011. Book of Abstracts.

For the other one, various papers will be publsished soon. I will keep you informed.

Thanks Michel. I always enjoy reading up on stuff like this. Having read some papers on both now, it seems thiamethoxam is more soluble in water than imidacloprid so it is more available in the soil for root uptake and translocation. I would guess this is one of the reasons why you think it is better because it can help already infected trees faster?

Thiamethoxam can be bought here in the US as Maxide Dual Action Insect Killer. It is pretty cheap and it is a granular so you can apply and it should last a while.

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MattyB

If my trees get RPW or BPW I'll call you Len.

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Ferry

Thiametoxam is better, not for its disolution (in fact it is a suspension and you have to be very careful to remove it permanently during its use) but for the persistance of its activity compared with imidacloprid, 6 months compared to less than 2. That means that, compared with imidacloprid, it is in the palms metabolized at a lower speed. Its way of action is also completely different: thiamaetoxam kills the larvae, Imidacloprid creates sub-letal conditions.

In our integrated strategy for eradication of the RPW, the purpose of chemicals injections with long term persistancy is for the preventive action. For curative action, mechanical sanitation constitutes a very efficient tool.

Regards

Michel Ferry

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Cristóbal

Today finally i go to see the palm i post in message # 576 with date of 12 january.

This palm is now dead. See the old fotos in my post # 576 and the new ones i post now. I asked to the wife of the owner this person there today, if they see black or red insects, and she telled to me that yes about one month ago they find many black insects. And her children they take them home in glass bottles for they are strange and ugly to them, that they never see insects like these before. They keeped them in the glass for some days and then they died. When i showed to her fotos of RHYNCHOPHORUS PALMARUM - she said to me yes these are the insects they see before.

Today i look for insects, but i dont find any thing and ask to her to call me please if they see more of the insects and to keep them for me to pick-up.

This is now palm # 2 i know in Tijuana with this insect.

I can only think now there are many more sick palms in Tijuana. I am sick to think of this, I cannot think of Tijuana and not think of palm trees ! We do not have here the scientists, specialisis of trees and money to stop this. How much more time when it is out of control here and than it is to go to California USA ?

FOTOS FROM TODAY - THIS BEAUTIFUL PALM IS NOW DEAD

post-285-009806000 1328763303_thumb.jpg

post-285-038359700 1328763376_thumb.jpg

post-285-083601300 1328763443_thumb.jpg

post-285-030933600 1328763517_thumb.jpg

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Cristóbal

FOTOS OF HOLES IN TRUNK

They are old but probaly from the insect. I see the same holes in the first palm i find in december 2010.

post-285-040817300 1328763655_thumb.jpg

post-285-002174600 1328763694_thumb.jpg

Edited by Cristóbal

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PalmatierMeg

So sad. I'm sorry to hear this.

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DoomsDave

I saw one of the AG inspectors on his route today, and asked if he had seen anything. He told me no infestations had been found since the beginning, but that they should be continuing there work for a long time. He said palms are big business so a lot of resources are dedicated to this.

He had a real genuine interest in palms, and said. "I love my job, I get to drive around a beautiful town looking at palm trees." I asked him for an employment application...

Find out who it is, so we can get him in the PSSC . . . :lol:

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DoomsDave

Today finally i go to see the palm i post in message # 576 with date of 12 january.

This palm is now dead. See the old fotos in my post # 576 and the new ones i post now. I asked to the wife of the owner this person there today, if they see black or red insects, and she telled to me that yes about one month ago they find many black insects. And her children they take them home in glass bottles for they are strange and ugly to them, that they never see insects like these before. They keeped them in the glass for some days and then they died. When i showed to her fotos of RHYNCHOPHORUS PALMARUM - she said to me yes these are the insects they see before.

Today i look for insects, but i dont find any thing and ask to her to call me please if they see more of the insects and to keep them for me to pick-up.

This is now palm # 2 i know in Tijuana with this insect.

I can only think now there are many more sick palms in Tijuana. I am sick to think of this, I cannot think of Tijuana and not think of palm trees ! We do not have here the scientists, specialisis of trees and money to stop this. How much more time when it is out of control here and than it is to go to California USA ?

FOTOS FROM TODAY - THIS BEAUTIFUL PALM IS NOW DEAD

post-285-009806000 1328763303_thumb.jpg

post-285-038359700 1328763376_thumb.jpg

post-285-083601300 1328763443_thumb.jpg

post-285-030933600 1328763517_thumb.jpg

Ouch!

That is not good.

Though I hear that RPW is worse. Hopefully, that discussion will stay academic . . .

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palmazon

3 huzzahs to Cristobal for sheer intrepidity

gotta love a Broncos fan...

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Ferry

Two answers regarding two previous messages:

- the holes that Cristobal has attributed to the weevils are quite certainly no relation with them. Tall palms can’t be attacked by the trunk excepted if they have offshoots or they are wounded but in that case, palms will fall down long time before any fronds bending and drying will produce. The palm observed by Cristobal, if the attack is really due to weevils, has been as usual infested from the bases of the central fronds.

- I am afraid that plant protection authority in California is repeating the same mistake that has had disastrous consequences in Europe and that consists to rely on inspectors’ activity to detect infested palms. Detection to be efficient and to permit early detection and rapid sanitation to avoid or stop pest dispersal must be based on intense and repeated information, mobilization and training of local authorities, palms owners, palms trimmers, nurseries.

Best regards.

Michel Ferry

Email: ferry.palm@gamil.com

Web site: http://www.gdset.fr/

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Ferry

a mistake in my email address. The right one is ferry.palm@gmail.com

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mlovecan

Two answers regarding two previous messages:

- the holes that Cristobal has attributed to the weevils are quite certainly no relation with them. Tall palms can’t be attacked by the trunk excepted if they have offshoots or they are wounded

Hi Michel,

I am not in any way questioning your knowledge and experience in this specific field.

However, I am not sure if the experiences across Europe are 100% identical. Just as the pest has vastly different coloring, my belief is their is some variation in it's behaviour.

For example, even though I am in Greece like Dimitris ( we are pretty much in opposite ends of the country ), I have not seen a single Washingtonia affected by RPW. In what I consider "peak" activity two years ago, my Washingtonias contantly had RPW buzzing around them, attempting to enter the palms. Now that time is passed ( a fact I attribute to the 95-97% elimination of all CIDP ), I believe the major threat has passed.

I had exactly 3 palms infected - a Majesty that succumbed rather quicckly, a CIDPxRoebellini that I very nearly lost, and my P. dactylifera.

With the assistance of Confidor, my CIDPxroebellini has fully recovered ( and now has a very nice crown again ) and my P. dactylifera is trailing closely behind.

Neither of my Phoenix had any leaf damage whatsoever. The damage was only on the trunks! The palms had no damage whatsoever, the very clean entry point of the RPW was quite clear, and the dying RPW clearly exited from the entrt point. Dead RPW lay on the ground directly under the entry point after application of Confidor.

During recover of my CIDPxroebellini, when I inserted the Confidor injector for the second time, the whole injector emptied out and the contents leaked out the bottom of the tree. There was clearly a cavity inside the trunk ( and the only entry hole was clearly in the trunk )! I refilled the injector and inserted it into a new hole where the leakage did not occur. This particular palm is shorter than me, so I am able to inspect the entire palm from top to bottom quite closely.

I have three injectors in my dactylifera. The infection definitely started in the trunk ( the smell of RPW is unmistakable once you've witnessed it ). I have used 3 injectors in the dactylifera and have never encountered any form of leakage due to a cavity in the palm. The infection, again is cleared on this palm and it is almost completely recovered.

Confidor sitting in injectors in the two palms have, in my observation, acted as a very strong repellant of RPW from my garden. Obviously, the beginning of my observation was when RPS peaked in our area. At that time, I was literally seeing 100s of RPW in my garden every day.

Again, I am not in any way questioning your knowledge and experience. However, in Rhodes Greece my observations of RPW do not match your observations in your part of Europe.

Regards

Maurice

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DoomsDave

Two answers regarding two previous messages:

- the holes that Cristobal has attributed to the weevils are quite certainly no relation with them. Tall palms can’t be attacked by the trunk excepted if they have offshoots or they are wounded but in that case, palms will fall down long time before any fronds bending and drying will produce. The palm observed by Cristobal, if the attack is really due to weevils, has been as usual infested from the bases of the central fronds.

- I am afraid that plant protection authority in California is repeating the same mistake that has had disastrous consequences in Europe and that consists to rely on inspectors’ activity to detect infested palms. Detection to be efficient and to permit early detection and rapid sanitation to avoid or stop pest dispersal must be based on intense and repeated information, mobilization and training of local authorities, palms owners, palms trimmers, nurseries.

Best regards.

Michel Ferry

Email: ferry.palm@gamil.com

Web site: http://www.gdset.fr/

I agree!

I am not sanguine about this, protestations by the learned to the contrary.

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Phoenikakias

Maurice I post these pics as a proof of your claims. Depicted dacty suffered an rpw infestation and guess where. In Kos. Tree was not cut down but fell allown due to the damages caused by rpw only in the lower part of the trunk

post-6141-081659500 1328902415_thumb.jpgpost-6141-064415000 1328902457_thumb.jpg[attachmtent=133310:4d0b31ee60ded_pc170414.jpg]

post-6141-011637600 1328902492_thumb.jpg

Edited by Phoenikakias

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Takil-Explorer

Well it seems that Rynchophorus has reaged Mexico. Thats very bad as there you do not have the pestcontrol like they have in the US. Ones its spread south probably nothing will stop it. A serious thread for indigenous palms in Mexico and farther south!

Alexander

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Cedric

Ferry is right about this those holes could be anything, bumblebee, wood borers man made, there is a possibility the palm was affected by weevil when it was tiny and then left alone for many years but thats not likely.

The weevils tend to go for wounds around the crown shaft and leaf bases. If a palm is infested for a long time the whole portion of the trunk since affected will look like a sieve as each successive year the soft areas just under and including the leaf bases will be will be attacked. Bellow the trunk pre-weevil will be fine. Some palms are even able to live and grow with weevils from juveniles to adulthood in this case the entire trunk will be an empty honey comb of holes or randomly dotted if the wood and or leaf base is extremely hard like in Dypsis decaryi.

From experience I will say the most important thing to do now is to protect your palms, and the surest way of doing this for all species is not to remove spent leaves, leave them till they are completely utterly dry and fall off themselves. This way a passing weevil will not smell your palm as a suitable nesting site. Dont even cut the portion of the leaf that is dry or yellow, just leave the whole thing.

Over and I mean even what some people consider normal pruning of phoenix species is a big no no no. The wounds left by disfiguring palms in this way are the perfect entry points for the weevil. The pine apple/cone look should be discouraged in favour of a more natural look of dry hanging leaves.

The weevils love fat juicy exposed living flesh or semi exposed young leaf bases and find positively irresistible those leaf bases juicily sliced in half by over zealous parks departments. Thinning clustering palms by removing trunks is also very bad as is removing suckers at the base of trunks.

Plams with crown shafts consisting of tightly wrapped thin (relatively) leaf bases forming a cylinder (taller the better) are often left completely alone (with some notable exceptions), however they are not immune one simple common mistake or a good storm and they are also fair game. If you prematurely pull or cut a self-cleaning palms leaf or worse a none self cleaning palms leaf a tiny to large line of wound will be all it takes for weevil to get interested as this is a perfect entry point to lay eggs. The exposed soft white cabbage like underlying leaf base attachment and trunk of prematurely pulled leaves have had no gradual exposure to sun and so are also excellent areas for weevils to lay eggs.

Leaving leaves to dry on a palm is of course also the best way to ensure your palms health as the nutrients are reabsorbed from the drying leaves benifiting the palm as a whole especialy magnesium and pottasium absorption

The exceptions to crown shaft palms that are naturaly vulnerable to attack are quite a few. Ravenea rivularis comes to mind as the more commonly one grown. These are especially vulnerable as younger palms when the leaf bases are fat and juicy and easily damaged, as the palms mature and put on a meter or three of trunk the leaf base gets thinner and not so enticing. In the case of rivularis the natural shedding of dead leaves in younger palms (couple of meters of trunk and under) is still a problem as the leaf bases are often still full of moisture at the time and will crack or burst as the leaf falls into a perpendicular position to the trunk, its these cracks that ooze and send out tiny heady aromas beckoning weevils. Fast growing palms are also at risk becaue of the constant shedding of leaves and associated smell.

Many palms are seemingly not affected at all and if I was planting now from scratch I would take this into account as a priority even in areas not yet affected. Many species if managed correctly like Livistona species for example seem perfectly Ok as are Roystonia, Wodyetia etc etc if no natural damage like wind or storm , actually I dont have a complete list, not even of my own palms that are not affected but think this research would or should be a matter of priority for this board.

Areas already hard hit like parts of Asia eg Malaysia, Thailand, Indoneasia etc would be excelent places to start that research, maybe a project for the American biennial lot heading to Thailand this year, ask as they go because this information is not set in stone and nor is it yet complete it will include many different peoples experiences and observations with different species as there are many many many in the vast Arecaceae family across the globe.

In Hong Kong there are a few weevil species that affect palms and bamboos, I dont have the red one yet in my garden, but I notice the phoenix canariensis at Disney world have been affected, here they are using baited weevil traps, unfortunately the palms arent looking good and the new leaves are extremely short.

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