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Tom S

Red Palm weevils found in Laguna Beach, CA

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palmpuppy

Ron, Saddleback Church has a grouping of 7 CIDPs at the Portola entrance across from the old Armstrong nursery. Last Spring I noticed that they had replaced one with a dactylifera. I went to look again and see they've replaced anther one - so recently that its watering berm is still intact. Saddleback has a huge problem with Fusarium though out their complex and I suspect they are finding that replacing them with more CIDPs is prohibitively expensive and as a result are going with dactyliferas.

We went back over there yesterday, took more pictures, and noticed what you are referring to (suspected CIDPs were being replaced by dactyliferas). We went further down Portola and noticed that at the other corners, dactyliferas were being planted and assumed the church was attempting to make a match-up on their corner (and a choice made because of costs).

I think my biggest concern was the CIDP with the holes in the trimmed petioles. We were wondering about the holes.

Sad to see the destruction of so many gorgeous CIDPs (there are a lot fewer than what I remember from some years ago at this location and looks like they are going to be losing more next to the building), but of course would much rather see that than RPW. Just hoping there is an explanation for the holes. We do appreciate input on our concerns.

Jackie

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palmpuppy

btw, the holes are not in the CIDP that is obviously Fusarium. Those holes are in the CIDP in this photo:

post-4749-068506200 1293732293_thumb.jpg

Jackie

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WestCoastGal

BTW I'm not trying to dispute FW in the Saddleback case but when I go back to look at the photos I still don't see the clear one-sided browning of the frond, which I have noticed in CIDP in my area that have it. It was very evident in the palms I've seen, in fact very textbook case looking (completely brown on one side of the rachis and all green on the other). I know that the fronds will eventually turn all brown as the disease progresses. I'm wondering if my cooler temps up here in the SF Bay area slow the progression of the wilt up the side of the frond so it stays noticeable for a longer period of time.

Anyway I don't mean to get off the topic of RPW but since it was raised I am very curious about the practice of replacing FW CIDPs with P. dactyliferas. In my area I've noticed that they leave the ground unplanted when the tree has been removed. I read that the FW could stay in the ground due to infected root pieces and would continue to contaminate the soil for decades. I also remember reading that FW could infect other Phoenix palms, including the P. dactyliferas. If so, it would seem the church is at high risk for having their replacement palms infected and meeting the same fate as their CIDPs. Here's a link to a publication from the University of Florida mentioning this: "Evidence accumulated over the last 5 yrs in Miami-Dade Co. strongly suggests that we are now seeing Fusarium wilt in true date, P. dactylifera, and possibly in Senegal date, P. reclinata." The publication is from 7/2003 and perhaps the research since then has proven this not to be the case. I've also heard of Queen palms and W. robusta with FW, although I'm not sure if it is the same kind as affects CIDPs. It seems likely that someone trimming the palms somewhere in the past spread the disease to their other CIDPs by using infected saws (that or I've heard infected sawdust could help spread FW from tree to tree).

Edited by WestCoastGal
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LJG

This all makes sense now. If those P. dactyliferas are relatively new, often they top the fronds while they're still tied up. Looks at how many fronds are neatly trimmed at the tips. This is what's going on I bet. Hopefully we're looking at Fusarium on the CIDPs and transplant trimming on the Dacts. That's my hopefull assessment.

Len, so how does Fusarium work? It's usually transmitted through pruning tools, right? Does it then move to the soil? Is that area always contaminated and unsuitable for more CIDPs?

Pruning tools are #1. I also think animals. Also if FW killed a plant, it is in the soil. You cannot get rid of it so you can not plant another one in its place. Another problem with it being in the soil is if you have other CIDPs next to a dead one or one that was removed, its roots as they grow and spread out enter the spot where the dead tree was removed. CIDPs roots divide and split. So when they do this they open themselves up for an attack since they expose openings for the FW to get into the plant.

I spent time doing weeks of research trying to save one of my plants. I did everything I could to save it but it died a few years back. I have not touched my other CIDPs and just this fall another one got it. There is not another CIDP with FW even close to it. The closest is a neighbor 20 houses away. So this tells me it is probably airborne too. I have read a few reports out of UF or Australia (forget which) that believes this true too.

I once had 5. I lost two to FW. I have three left and I am actually selling one or two of the 3 left. They are such amazing palms, but they come with so much baggage. Not only do they get FW but know we have to worry about the RPW. What next? Also, their roots are so invasive it makes it tough to plant under them.

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LJG

Anyway I don't mean to get off the topic of RPW but since it was raised I am very curious about the practice of replacing FW CIDPs with P. dactyliferas. In my area I've noticed that they leave the ground unplanted when the tree has been removed. I read that the FW could stay in the ground due to infected root pieces and would continue to contaminate the soil for decades. I also remember reading that FW could infect other Phoenix palms, including the P. dactyliferas. If so, it would seem the church is at high risk for having their replacement palms infected and meeting the same fate as their CIDPs. Here's a link to a publication from the University of Florida mentioning this: "Evidence accumulated over the last 5 yrs in Miami-Dade Co. strongly suggests that we are now seeing Fusarium wilt in true date, P. dactylifera, and possibly in Senegal date, P. reclinata." The publication is from 7/2003 and perhaps the research since then has proven this not to be the case. I've also heard of Queen palms and W. robusta with FW, although I'm not sure if it is the same kind as affects CIDPs. It seems likely that someone trimming the palms somewhere in the past spread the disease to their other CIDPs by using infected saws (that or I've heard infected sawdust could help spread FW from tree to tree).

Rememebr that the pathogen is "Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. Canariensis". It is a species specific killer. Other Phoenix palms do get infected. It is a proven fact. However FW does not kill the other ones. Ones that have died usually were hit with Pink Rot as the plant was weak from FW.

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Mats

... if FW killed a plant, it is in the soil. You cannot get rid of it so you can not plant another one in its place.

Really? I know there are some pretty strong soil fumigants out there ...

25 years ago we used to use one (either methyl bromide or Vapam, iirc) on Kauai's north shore to treat for phytophthora, which is pretty persistent.

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LJG

... if FW killed a plant, it is in the soil. You cannot get rid of it so you can not plant another one in its place.

Really? I know there are some pretty strong soil fumigants out there ...

25 years ago we used to use one (either methyl bromide or Vapam, iirc) on Kauai's north shore to treat for phytophthora, which is pretty persistent.

No idea if anyone tried those but I know there is no known fungicide that kills this one. People have tried everything too.

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Ron Vanderhoff

I stopped by the Portola Parkway/Saddleback Parkway Phoenix this morning and do not believe these palms are symptomatic of palm weevils. I feel rather certain of this, but nonetheless am forwarding a few images to Don Hodel of UCCE.

As mentioned previously by others, several Phoenix canariensis and P. dactylifera are suffering at this location, both from fusarium as well as from poor cultural habits.

Phoenix dactylifera at the site:

The most notable symptom is the cut leaflets at the tip of several leaves. This was only seen on the P. dactyliferas and on none of the P. canariensis. The cuts were very clean and straight. There were no cuts on any of the leaflets on the side of the rachis, only at the apex. No "V" shaped notching of the leaflets either. These sorts of tip cuts are common on rather recently transplanted Phoenix. In addition to Jackie's excellent pictures, here are some more from this morning.

The suspicious P. dactylifera's:

  • post-5063-035745000 1293762941_thumb.jpg
  • Some cut leaf tips are evident:
  • post-5063-009494100 1293762845_thumb.jpg
  • The same palm showing cut leaf tips from two angles:
  • post-5063-069660900 1293762938_thumb.jpgpost-5063-037474400 1293762937_thumb.jpg
  • Unrelated to these tip cuts, these P. dactylifera's are also showing signs of fusarium, although not as obvious as some of the P. canariensis nearby. This image of a dactylifera shows the one-sided drying/dehydration of the one of the leaves. It is a bit hard to see in the photo (right in the center), but this is a typical symptom of fusarium wilt:
  • post-5063-088766500 1293763287_thumb.jpg

Phoenix canariensis at the site:



  • As mentioned earlier, there are a number at the site that are showing various stages of near certain fusarium infection.
  • I cannot for certain explain the holes in the cut petiole bases. My suspicion is that some of these are simply the natural decay of the vascular bundles, exposed to the elements. Other holes could be insect related, but are more likely adventitious or opportunistic insects, not primary pests. I am asking Mr. Hodel for further advice on this.
  • There are some cultural and maintenance stresses on these palms as well that are contributing to the poor appearance of some of the plants. Here is an example of a planting elevation problem on this P. canariensis - which has caused it to root awkwardly and on one side. It is also carrying a very light crown.
  • post-5063-079832400 1293764225_thumb.jpg

I drove the grounds of Saddleback Church and did a quick visual inspection of the other Phoenix on the site and do not see any further symptoms of palm weevils. I also took a very quick look at Instant Jungle nursery across the street, with nothing suspicious noticed their either.

In summary, my strong opinion is that we have no palm weevil issues at this location.

However, we must all be careful about discouraging members and others from reporting suspicious palms. Just because these do not appear to be weevil infested palms does not mean they should not have been reported or should not have been checked. Jackie did exactly the right thing! Thank you Jackie. We never know, we could get a report tomorrow that could change the entire geography of this problem - much like Cristobal's discovery in Tijuana.

Let's keep looking. As stated, I am sending a few pictures of these palms to Don Hodel and if I receive any useful comments from him I will pass them along.

Ron

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palmpuppy

In summary, my strong opinion is that we have no palm weevil issues at this location.

Ron

Thanks, Ron. That information is received here with a very big sigh of relief! :) Will be interested in learning the origin of the holes.

Jackie

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WestCoastGal

... if FW killed a plant, it is in the soil. You cannot get rid of it so you can not plant another one in its place.

Really? I know there are some pretty strong soil fumigants out there ...

25 years ago we used to use one (either methyl bromide or Vapam, iirc) on Kauai's north shore to treat for phytophthora, which is pretty persistent.

In the publication from the University of Florida I linked to in an above post it specifically mentioned: "Use of soil fumigants like methyl bromide/chloropicrin or metam sodium (Vapam) may help, but is not likely to eradicate the fungus. In other words, we have no effective chemicals to control this fungus."

Len, sorry to hear you lost a few CIDP to FW. You also mentioned in one of your posts above (sorry I don't know how to quote from more than one post to bring your text here) that you thought your second case of infection might have been airborne spread since no other CIDPs were nearby. I read somewhere that they thought FW's spread could also be through waterborne means, not airborne. Water traveling through an infected area, carrying the pathogen to the roots of a susceptible tree's root system.

Here's what I don't understand. If FW can kill a CIDP, and can infect a P. dactylifera although not kill it, why would anyone want to plant a P. dactylifera in a known FW infected location? Aren't you providing another host for the FW to spread from? The tree trimmer trims the P. dactylifera, picks up the disease on his tools and then spreads it when he cuts the next Phoenix palm. And yes, a weakened tree will be more susceptible to attacks from other sources including weevils if they're in the area. Seems irresponsible to me and just a way to sell another costly mature tree that will ultimately succumb to some disease from a weakened state from the FW. I'm obviously thinking of the church's site where mature P. dactyliferas are being replanted into infected areas.

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Ron Vanderhoff

I posted some pictures here a couple of weeks ago about a CIDP on Pacific Coast Highway, about 1/4 miles north of the third positive find. I've been watching it and now I'm going to report it to CDFA. Take a look and see what you think.

Here's the location if you want to go see it. Near the intersection of Pacific Coast Highway and Ledroit Street:

post-5063-026640200 1294628059_thumb.jpg

There are five P. canarienses in a row here. The palm I suspect is on the far left:

post-5063-008155600 1294628053_thumb.jpg

This "L" shaped notching on the leaflet to the side of the rachis is supposed to be characteristic of CIDP:

post-5063-096822100 1294628063_thumb.jpg

Here's another frond:

post-5063-060919400 1294628068_thumb.jpg

And another - this one looks really suspicious:

post-5063-028640800 1294628072_thumb.jpg

One more:

post-5063-080216300 1294628088_thumb.jpg

So then I took a close look up the trunk and on at least a couple of the petiole bases I could see some damage that looks like larval feeding. Here's one:

post-5063-024895500 1294628076_thumb.jpg

It's a bit hard to see in a photo, but it was pretty clear with binoculars standing under the tree. Here it is again, a little closer:

post-5063-022732400 1294628080_thumb.jpg

Finally, here is another petiole base with what also looks like pretty clear damage:

post-5063-042165000 1294628084_thumb.jpg

What do you all think? I'm sending this info to CDFA, so we'll see what they say.

Ron

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Ron Vanderhoff

After checking the palm in the previous post, and several others, I went back to another palm that I know CDFA is suspicious of - I also mentioned this tree in a prior post. It is only about 100 feet from find #2. I haven't heard whether there is a confirmation of RPW on this palm yet and since access to it is difficult I suspect they haven't done a crown inspection.

Here's sort of an overall of the crown:

post-5063-001603900 1294629464_thumb.jpg

Here's some of the symptoms that have them concerned.

Notice the shaved off tip, with the rachis partly severed, but still attached:

post-5063-020744800 1294629373_thumb.jpg

Here it is a little closer:

post-5063-068213200 1294629376_thumb.jpg

There are several leaves on this palm that show this particular symptom. This picture shows at least three:

post-5063-050659600 1294629369_thumb.jpg

Ron

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Ron Vanderhoff

Finally, I re-visited the CIDP on Coast Highway that was found positive with RPW six weeks ago. It's still there, no sign of removal or sanitation. I don't know what the disposition of this palm is. It is on private property, so USDA and CDFA have no authority. I'm worried because we know there are live Red Palm Weevils in this palm right now.

This probably shows the damage the clearest. Notice the "L" shaped damage on the left and some additional more irregular damage to the right:

post-5063-036783000 1294630234_thumb.jpg

Not "L" shaped, but the leaflets have been sheared for quite a distance. The leaf on the right might have some of the same damage as well:

post-5063-018062000 1294630227_thumb.jpg

The leaflets at the tip of this leaf have been sheared. Notice that the rachis in the center is still intact but dead. This is similar to what we are seeing in the CIDP in the last post:

post-5063-087907600 1294630222_thumb.jpg

This leaf also has chewed off leaflets on the tip:

post-5063-095933300 1294630281_thumb.jpg

Ron

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Cristóbal

I posted some pictures here a couple of weeks ago about a CIDP on Pacific Coast Highway, about 1/4 miles north of the third positive find. I've been watching it and now I'm going to report it to CDFA. Take a look and see what you think.

Here's the location if you want to go see it. Near the intersection of Pacific Coast Highway and Ledroit Street:

post-5063-026640200 1294628059_thumb.jpg

There are five P. canarienses in a row here. The palm I suspect is on the far left:

post-5063-008155600 1294628053_thumb.jpg

This "L" shaped notching on the leaflet to the side of the rachis is supposed to be characteristic of CIDP:

post-5063-096822100 1294628063_thumb.jpg

Here's another frond:

post-5063-060919400 1294628068_thumb.jpg

And another - this one looks really suspicious:

post-5063-028640800 1294628072_thumb.jpg

One more:

post-5063-080216300 1294628088_thumb.jpg

So then I took a close look up the trunk and on at least a couple of the petiole bases I could see some damage that looks like larval feeding. Here's one:

post-5063-024895500 1294628076_thumb.jpg

It's a bit hard to see in a photo, but it was pretty clear with binoculars standing under the tree. Here it is again, a little closer:

post-5063-022732400 1294628080_thumb.jpg

Finally, here is another petiole base with what also looks like pretty clear damage:

post-5063-042165000 1294628084_thumb.jpg

What do you all think? I'm sending this info to CDFA, so we'll see what they say.

Ron

I think this palm has fusarium. But what you show of the fronds is also suspicious. You look for the cocoons dead weevils and pupas on the ground ?

Edited by Cristóbal
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Ron Vanderhoff

I posted some pictures here a couple of weeks ago about a CIDP on Pacific Coast Highway, about 1/4 miles north of the third positive find. I've been watching it and now I'm going to report it to CDFA. Take a look and see what you think.

Here's the location if you want to go see it. Near the intersection of Pacific Coast Highway and Ledroit Street:

post-5063-026640200 1294628059_thumb.jpg

There are five P. canarienses in a row here. The palm I suspect is on the far left:

post-5063-008155600 1294628053_thumb.jpg

This "L" shaped notching on the leaflet to the side of the rachis is supposed to be characteristic of CIDP:

post-5063-096822100 1294628063_thumb.jpg

Here's another frond:

post-5063-060919400 1294628068_thumb.jpg

And another - this one looks really suspicious:

post-5063-028640800 1294628072_thumb.jpg

One more:

post-5063-080216300 1294628088_thumb.jpg

So then I took a close look up the trunk and on at least a couple of the petiole bases I could see some damage that looks like larval feeding. Here's one:

post-5063-024895500 1294628076_thumb.jpg

It's a bit hard to see in a photo, but it was pretty clear with binoculars standing under the tree. Here it is again, a little closer:

post-5063-022732400 1294628080_thumb.jpg

Finally, here is another petiole base with what also looks like pretty clear damage:

post-5063-042165000 1294628084_thumb.jpg

What do you all think? I'm sending this info to CDFA, so we'll see what they say.

Ron

I think this palm has fusarium. But what you show of the fronds is also suspicious. You look for the cocoons dead weevils and pupas on the ground ?

I think you are right Cristobal. This palm does appear to be showing some early signs of fusarium as well.

Ron

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Kathryn

I found what was probably a Rynchophorus cruentatus palm weevil in March of 2007. Here's the post from back then.

Beetle on My Palm

I never did hear back from the Ag center about it. Here's another picture I took just before releasing the cute thing. (just kidding, it died in the container soon after).

post-158-016295700 1294721583_thumb.jpg

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Ron Vanderhoff

I found what was probably a Rynchophorus cruentatus palm weevil in March of 2007. Here's the post from back then.

Beetle on My Palm

I never did hear back from the Ag center about it. Here's another picture I took just before releasing the cute thing. (just kidding, it died in the container soon after).

post-158-016295700 1294721583_thumb.jpg

Fortunately, this does indeed look like Rhynchophorus cruentatus, the Palmetto Weevil and not Rhynchophorus ferrugineus or Rhynchophorus palmarum, which are far more damaging to palms.

Rhynchophorus cruentatus is a native species and well established throughout Florida and portions of Georgia, South Carolina, Louisiana and Texas.

Ron

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Ferry

Just back from Cap Verdes Islands where hopefully no RPW has yet be introduced and where splendid Phoenix atlantica can be observed, I want to wish to all of you a happy new year for 2011 and also to add a special wish for the success of the quick erradication of the RPW in California. To be successful erradication must be obtained quickly. And to be obtained quickly, we should not wait for the discovery of symptoms from ground observation but we should add to this important activity the creation of inspection windows at least to all the Phoenix canariensis located at 200-300 meters around the infested ones. Otherwise I am affraid that a slow dispersion will take place leading to an extended, continuing and costly inspection and erradication program that will jeopardize the final success of erradication and consecuently of stopping the RPW extension. The "soft" strategy has been applied for now 5 years in Bordighera area in Italia conducing to drop by drop infestation and palm destruction with a pest that has now reach San Remo and is threatening the fantastic landscape patrimony of this city.

Succeessful erradication programs mean, against RPW as against any other pest, strong action to obtain as quickly as possible the erradication of the pest.

Best regards

Michel Ferry

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US_Marine

I sure hope RPW is not infecting more trees. I think its been warm enough for them to be active right?

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Cristóbal

I report they cut the phoenix canariensis in Tijuana with the black palm weevil, the palm is gone.

There is no news about the red palm weevil in southern california ?

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paulgila

we got an update at the PSSC banquet last month. don hodel reported that the rpw sightings were confined to a small area in Laguna beach,CA.

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Tom S

The last Palm they found an infestation in was still there last week, and so are the ones that Ron suspected.

Tom

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Ferry

The first Phoenix canariensis infested by the RPW has been discovered in Niza early in February. Once more, this infested palm has been discovered thank to the pruning activity of a trimmer.

Despite the opposition of many plant protection administrations and even so called palms experts, experience in all infested countries demonstrates how necessary is pruning for RPW early detection. Opposition to pruning is based on serious ignorance on the modalities of Phoenix canariensis infestation and on the adoption of an ostrich policy. If we want to succeed RPW eradication and consequently to save palms, we have to detect infested palms as soon as possible. This is the base of a successful strategy.

Pruning is the only way to detect early symptoms. Contrary to what has been repeated so many times (due to an erroneous and disastrous copy and paste of papers concerning date palm), pruning does not facilitate or increase infestation. It just creates, during a short time, a preferential attraction to the pruned palms but, if these palms had not been pruned, they would have infested anyway. Furthermore, treatment just after pruning allows protecting the palms and contributes to kill adults RPW. Consequently, well done pruning presents one complementary advantage by reducing moving RPW population.

In Niza, the trimmer who has detected the infested palm has benefited of the officially homologated training that we are organizing since November 2009 on integrated strategy for RPW eradication. Such training (2,5 days: half theory, half practice) is fundamental to apply correctly the different techniques to detect infested palms, sanitize infested spots, save infested palm and protect non infested palms. 140 trimmers have been already trained in France. They are the only ones authorized to operate in infested areas (200 meters radius around an infested palm or a trap that has captured a RPW). We have fight to obtain the inclusion of this obligation in the decree that has been adopted in France in july 2010. The only intervention of officially authorized trained trimmers allows to avoid bad practices that would have been frequent (for example many trimmers ignore that a palm is not a tree and that palms pruning is in fact not at all a pruning) and catastrophic.

The RPW eradication decree has been obtained in France thanks to the efforts of professionals’ organizations, some municipalities and INRA. These actors have succeeded first to convince the Plant Protection Authority of the seriousness of this pest and then to obtain that the decree was elaborated in close cooperation with them. The decree finally adopted reflects quite well the integrated eradication strategy that we had previously elaborated and tested.

Best regards.

Michel Ferry

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Kostas

The way i see it,the eradication effords in California are going too slow to be effective and i see disaster in the near future if reporting and action dont come closer together. By the time a palm displays some of the syptoms neccessary to ID PRW,the larvae are less than a month to 2 months at the very best, away from flying away as adults and continuing the spread. What i would propose is to heavilly treat all palms suspected as infected as soon as they are reported and then you can do further inspections and decide if the palm is indeed certainly infected or not and act in the way you have decided to. But you cant afford to wait for treatment or whatever or you will have several more infected palms as a result! There are only very few of them infected right now so act fast while you can!!!!!sad.gif In Pyrgos,a really badly affected area of Greece,a mature and seeming unsymptomatic Phoenix canariensis can die within only 3 months!

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BS Man about Palms

I realised that I had not posted this pix of one I questioned a while back. I thought I saw some of the "notches" on the old leaves...

What first brought it to my attention was a year or more ago I noticed the crown/emerging growth, growing at an angle, kinda like the leaning Kentia problem.

This palm is in Olivenhain, just outside of Rancho Santa Fe in So Cal. If you are at the "Old School house" in Olivenhain, you'll be right next to them.

The cross streets are....

7th and So. Rancho Santa Fe rd.

post-27-060630400 1299561733_thumb.jpg post-27-007963700 1299561884_thumb.jpg

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BS Man about Palms

One more picture..

post-27-055401200 1299561977_thumb.jpg

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yachtingone

:D

we got an update at the PSSC banquet last month. don hodel reported that the rpw sightings were confined to a small area in Laguna beach,CA.

Don also reported that Laguna Beach is a "palm tree island". The weevils can fly 1/2 mile. From Laguna Beach palm trees to the next cities palm trees are miles apart.

That effectably isolates the beatle to Laguna Beach. They plan to mulch entire CIDP to 1/2" pieces.

I wonder if one flew into B.S. man's vehicle while he was there? I think it might be a good idea not to visit those infected palms this spring when the beetles start flying again.

Btw Don mentioned until they start to fly again they wont spread to other trees so there is time to eradicate them in Laguna Beach

It was NOT brought up at the meeting if the beetles could be transported out of the area by people by hitch hiking a ride?:huh:

Randy

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BS Man about Palms

Oh- Don mentioned the possibility some think that they came in as larvae as there is a community nearby that likes grub/larvae/beetles to eat and they may have come as a live shipment sometime back....as food!

Smuggled or legally, don't know.

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MattyB

Bill,

please report that palm to the authorities. There's email links in this thread.

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MattyB

Google Maps Link

I just reported a suspicious CIDP in National City. The crown has completely collapsed in the center. This is only a few miles from Tijuana where Cristobal found Black Palm Weevil. Anyone driving W on the 54 can see it off the the right in the old abandonded drive in theater just before you get to National City Blvd. and Interstate 5.

Stree View

Google Earth actually shows that the center of the palm has completely collapsed.

post-126-065810100 1299865179_thumb.jpg

Again, here's where you can send an email to

pesthotline@cdfa.ca.gov

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BS Man about Palms

Thanks for the link Matt.

I dutifully have reported it now...

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phoenixbob

CISR (Center for Invasive Species Research) posted a new item about RPW last week.

They talk about the 2 different color forms of the species - the red form, invasive in Europe and the Middle East, and the red stripe form, formerly known as R. vulneratus, which was the form found in Laguna Beach last fall. The 2 different color forms were found to be the same species in 2004.

Both forms are found together in Indonesia, so they've been trying to research the two forms on site, which also may be helpful in determining the origin of the Laguna Beach infestation.

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elskel

I live in Laguna Beach, yesterday I was leaving the supermarket which is very close to the infected tree on coast highway. The alley to the north had some tree trimmers blocking the alley and they were cutting down two CIP trees. The alley was bloced off and some people towards the top had cameras out. I was wondering if they found any more infected palms. This is very close to one of the infected trees. Also saw a crew spraying the CIPalms at the entance to Fashion Island Mall in Newport Beach approx. 4 miles north of Laguna Beach. brian

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MattyB

Google Maps Link

I just reported a suspicious CIDP in National City. The crown has completely collapsed in the center. This is only a few miles from Tijuana where Cristobal found Black Palm Weevil. Anyone driving W on the 54 can see it off the the right in the old abandonded drive in theater just before you get to National City Blvd. and Interstate 5.

Stree View

Google Earth actually shows that the center of the palm has completely collapsed.

post-126-065810100 1299865179_thumb.jpg

Again, here's where you can send an email to

pesthotline@cdfa.ca.gov

I recieved an email from the authorities that this palm is clear of RPW or BPW. They inspected it. They also contacted SDG&E, our power co., and it turns out that SDG&E topped this palm due to it's close proximity to the power lines.

Keep reporting suspicious trees y'all. Spring is springing and we don't want weevils-a-flyin'. Sounds like a song.

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DoomsDave

lET'S HOPE DR. HODEL'S OPTIMISM IS WELL-PLACED

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PALM MOD

lET'S HOPE DR. HODEL'S OPTIMISM IS WELL-PLACED

I will second that hopefullness.

After reading the RPW article in my just received new IPS "Palms" publication (Mar, 2011), it seems the host list has grown to include some much loved palms in SoCal, and the progressive news from the European theater is truly frightening.

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paulgila

Google Maps Link

I just reported a suspicious CIDP in National City. The crown has completely collapsed in the center. This is only a few miles from Tijuana where Cristobal found Black Palm Weevil. Anyone driving W on the 54 can see it off the the right in the old abandonded drive in theater just before you get to National City Blvd. and Interstate 5.

Stree View

Google Earth actually shows that the center of the palm has completely collapsed.

post-126-065810100 1299865179_thumb.jpg

Again, here's where you can send an email to

pesthotline@cdfa.ca.gov

I recieved an email from the authorities that this palm is clear of RPW or BPW. They inspected it. They also contacted SDG&E, our power co., and it turns out that SDG&E topped this palm due to it's close proximity to the power lines.

Keep reporting suspicious trees y'all. Spring is springing and we don't want weevils-a-flyin'. Sounds like a song.

a BAD song :angry:

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Central Floridave

I just finished reading that palms article as well. It mentioned if this bug gets into Florida that it could wipe out the native sabal population. Really? What is different about the red weevil from our native palmetto weevil? They look the same and do the same thing???

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BS Man about Palms

Google Maps Link

I just reported a suspicious CIDP in National City. The crown has completely collapsed in the center. This is only a few miles from Tijuana where Cristobal found Black Palm Weevil. Anyone driving W on the 54 can see it off the the right in the old abandonded drive in theater just before you get to National City Blvd. and Interstate 5.

Stree View

Google Earth actually shows that the center of the palm has completely collapsed.

post-126-065810100 1299865179_thumb.jpg

Again, here's where you can send an email to

pesthotline@cdfa.ca.gov

I recieved an email from the authorities that this palm is clear of RPW or BPW. They inspected it. They also contacted SDG&E, our power co., and it turns out that SDG&E topped this palm due to it's close proximity to the power lines.

Keep reporting suspicious trees y'all. Spring is springing and we don't want weevils-a-flyin'. Sounds like a song.

I have not received any notice back about the one I reported... probably because they don't like me... :P

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