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Red Palm weevils found in Laguna Beach, CA

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Alberto

Base of a broken frond

post-465-018021000 1293051681_thumb.jpg

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Alberto

Damage on the rachis and leaflets

post-465-032357200 1293051848_thumb.jpg

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Alberto

Detail on the leaflets

I sprayed and drenched the hole area with Methamidophos.

Could this be a R.palmarum affected CIDP,like the one Cristóbal found?

What do you specialist recomends me to do? I don´t want to loose this palm!:unsure:

THANKS!

post-465-044976700 1293052018_thumb.jpg

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Nigel

Today I found this on closer inspection on the afterside of my CIDP:

Some brown young fronds,another older frond leaning on another frond......

What is this...???? Rhinchophorus palmarum...?????:rage::(:(:(:blink:

Yes Alberto, this is the native palm weevil !! Is the same problem here, as I said to you they have problems here now with imported CIDP from Uruguay being attacked by our native weevil.

Our weevil also likes CIDP !!

Edited by Nigel

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WestCoastGal

Alberto have you seen any evidence of holes being bored into any of the fronds or trunk? It looks to me like something has been munching it from the outside for sure. Your third photo with the "amputation" is pretty weird--straight across.

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Ron Vanderhoff

I attended the first of the three Red Palm Weevil informational meetings in Irvine, CA on Tuesday morning, Dec 21. Unfortunately, I've been so busy I haven't had time to post any comments here.

The meeting was outstanding, really well put together and attended by about 40 or fifty people (the first session), probably most were professional arborists. Were any IPS members there?

The presenters were all of the key people involved in the issue and included several from USDA, CDFA, OC Agricultural Commissioner’s Office and University of California Cooperative Extension. All of the presenters were especially well informed and the photographs and organization of the information was incredibly thorough.

Since I left my notes at work, rather than the technical details of the two hour session, here are some more general comments:



  • USDA and CDFA should be given great credit for taking this issue very seriously. Even in a time of severe state fiscal problems the resources being delivered upon this issue are significant.
  • I was thoroughly impressed at how much the agencies and researchers involved have already learned about RPW. Even since the first informational meeting six or seven weeks ago, the depth of knowledge by these people and organization is deep. All involved appear to be taking this infestation and its negative potential very seriously.
  • Don Hodel, the UC agent from Los Angeles County, and one of the countries top palm experts, really knows his stuff. His presentation detailing the symptoms and very subtle things to look for was especially useful. I wish you could have all seen his slides and heard his narration. I feel like I know a lot more now about what to look for when in the field.
  • The latest update is still three Phoenix canariensis with positive RPW finds and all within a three or four block area. However, a sort of fourth occurrence took place about 8 blocks to the northwest when a homeowner found a live RPW wiggling around on his driveway. He collected it and reported it to authorities, who confirmed it as RPW. He had recently pruned a CIDP on his property and there is a possibility that the pruning may have aggravated the beetle.
  • Several other Phoenix canariensis in the immediate area are being closely watched and are suspicious for RPW. I would not at all be surprised to have a few more positive finds reported in the next few weeks.
  • Still no RPW's have been caught in the bucket traps that are being monitored in the nine mile area.
  • No quarantine is in place yet.
  • Authorities still have no authority to act upon a RPW infested palm occurring on private property. The cooperation of the homeowner would be required, without this CDFA and USDA are powerless - at least at present.

I spoke with Mr. Hodel privately and he again wishes to express his gratitude to those Palm Society members who are assisting with getting the word out as well as being on the lookout for potentially infested palms. Please continue reporting any candidates. He is also supportive of this specific PalmTalk discussion. As we spoke we know that a successful outcome to this problem will require scientists, professionals, amateur enthusiasts and the public to all be in cooperation and for us to interact with each other. Each of these groups and individuals brings a unique benefit to the campaign and their synergy is essential.

Ron

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DoomsDave

Hmm.

Okay.

I know this sounds exquisitely nutty . . .

Can you hear the RPW grubworms munching on an infested plant, by using a common stethoscope?

Just curious.

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_Keith

Just be safe. Follow the model of the South Fl ag folks when dealing with Citrus canker. Cut down every palm within a 10 mile radius of an infected palm and burn them. Don't stop till there is not a palm standing in So Cal. That ought to do it. Well show those weevils. We'll kill'em first.

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Mats

I attended the first of the three Red Palm Weevil informational meetings in Irvine, CA on Tuesday morning, Dec 21.

The meeting was outstanding, really well put together and attended by about 40 or fifty people (the first session), probably most were professional arborists. Were any IPS members there?

I'm not an IPS member, but I was there. And I agree, it was very informative. They seem to have a much better grasp of the job ahead of them than they exhibited at the first meeting.

Let's just hope this infestation really is contained in north Laguna. If so, we will have dodged a bullet.

I find it amazing that they may have only moved a few short blocks in almost 3 years. If they only knew the cornucopia of CIDPs there is to feast on just a couple miles up the PCH . . .

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DoomsDave

I attended the first of the three Red Palm Weevil informational meetings in Irvine, CA on Tuesday morning, Dec 21.

The meeting was outstanding, really well put together and attended by about 40 or fifty people (the first session), probably most were professional arborists. Were any IPS members there?

I'm not an IPS member, but I was there. And I agree, it was very informative. They seem to have a much better grasp of the job ahead of them than they exhibited at the first meeting.

Let's just hope this infestation really is contained in north Laguna. If so, we will have dodged a bullet.

I find it amazing that they may have only moved a few short blocks in almost 3 years. If they only knew the cornucopia of CIDPs there is to feast on just a couple miles up the PCH . . .

Dodged a thermonuke, more like it . . . .

I'm really curious to see if they're not somewhere else.

I earnestly hope that's true, but, well . ..

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WestCoastGal

Hmm.

Okay.

I know this sounds exquisitely nutty . . .

Can you hear the RPW grubworms munching on an infested plant, by using a common stethoscope?

Just curious.

Dave, I'm pretty sure that I read that listening equipment was used overseas--don't think it's a stethoscope but some high tech listening device. I think the success of it depends on how badly infested the tree is. So while it may be helpful, it sounded like it wasn't a be-all definitive way of establishing their presence in the tree.

I'll bet some of our European members can shed more light on this...but not as nutty as you might have initially thought.

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Ron Vanderhoff

This CIDP is being closely watched by the RPW researchers. It is only about 100 feet NNE of the second CIDP in Laguna Beach with a positive RPW find. It is on private property and difficult to access but ground crews have been watching the new fronds as they emerge. I would not be surprised if this tree soon becomes the fourth infested palm in Laguna.

This damage to the newest leaves is what has them worried:

post-5063-081126900 1293327743_thumb.jpg

This shows some notching also - in the somewhat typical "V" shape characteristic of RPW:

post-5063-095842700 1293327925_thumb.jpg

This leaf damage is more subtle, but the left side of the new leaf, near the tip shows some damage:

post-5063-041111000 1293328046_thumb.jpg

Another CODP that I've been watching is this one, a few more blocks north on PCH. It the palm on the left:post-5063-037195800 1293327856_thumb.jpg

There seems to be some notching on a couple of the new leaves, although it is a bit ragged, not as clean a cut as is usual for RPW:

post-5063-060756800 1293328299_thumb.jpg

Here's a closer look at the same leaf:

post-5063-036939200 1293328298_thumb.jpg

This is a different leaf with similar notching - somewhat "V" shaped:

post-5063-023196900 1293328475_thumb.jpg

I haven't reported this palm to the authorities yet, but probably will soon.

Ron

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mlovecan

The latest update is still three Phoenix canariensis with positive RPW finds and all within a three or four block area. However, a sort of fourth occurrence took place about 8 blocks to the northwest when a homeowner found a live RPW wiggling around on his driveway. He collected it and reported it to authorities, who confirmed it as RPW. He had recently pruned a CIDP on his property and there is a possibility that the pruning may have aggravated the beetle.

My theory behind dead RPW or those wiggling around on their backs in my garden ( I've been seeing this now for 2 years despite only 3 infestations in my garden ) is they have failed to enter the tree and no longer have sufficient energy to fly. At first I interpreted this as the effect of municipal-appplied pesticide. The municipality no longer applies pesticide - so this was probably never the reason.

I have found dozens of dead RPW lodged between the leaf bases of my washys yet none entered yet. I also find vast collections of dead RPW below my Arenga engleri which I interpret as very attractive to the pest yet impossible to obtain entry into.

Still no RPW's have been caught in the bucket traps that are being monitored in the nine mile area.

I would take this as a sign the population is still quite small and your chances of eradication are still quite great provided the current level of diligence continues.

Regards

Maurice

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mjff

[*]Authorities still have no authority to act upon a RPW infested palm occurring on private property. The cooperation of the homeowner would be required, without this CDFA and USDA are powerless - at least at present.

I wonder if uncooperative owners of infested palms on private property could be found liable for the damages they will cause by not cooperating? :hmm: Thinking very few would be uncooperative if the conversation went, "Mr Infested Palm Owner your CIDP is infested with RPW that threatens to cause billions of $'s worth of damage. You don't have to cooperate with our efforts to eradicate this pest, which may include destroying your CIDP that is going to die anyway, but if you don't, you could be found liable for the damages to other parties caused by the RPW's you are raising and protecting when they leave your property and infest other trees."

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Cristóbal

Yesterday Mark and Christina Hoddle the specialists of entomology for University of California they come to Tijuana yesterday monday in the morning.

We meet at the phoenix canariensis i find 27 november to see the palm and to give to them the insect and 2 cocoons i keep in the freezer for them to do analises of dna.

Mark and Christina Hoddle my friend Melchor at the palm.

post-285-057145400 1293586437_thumb.jpg

Christina Hoddle. We look for more insects, cocoons, larvas.

post-285-091585100 1293586542_thumb.jpg

One month after i find this palm now it is dead. See foto of yesterday and see foto i take 27 november.

Palm yesterday 27 december. Mark, Christina, Melchor look.

post-285-036256500 1293586647_thumb.jpg

Palm 27 november.

post-285-002076400 1293586751_thumb.jpg

By this palm they find one insect and larva alive and 5 dead insects and 5 dead larvas. The insects are BLACK PALM WEEVIL - RHYNCHOPHORUS PALMARUM - the brother of RED PALM WEEVIL - RHYNCHOPHORUS FERRURGINEUS.

***It destroys the palms just like Red Palm Weevil. Same thing and damages only diferent species.***

This is first time they find this insect in Baja California. They find it one time before in south Baja California, in 2003.

post-285-038077700 1293587303_thumb.jpg

*****************************************************************************************************************************************************

Information about RYNCHOPHORUS PALMARUM:

Rhynchophorus palmarum (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) - palm weevil

Following the introduction of Rhynchophorus ferrugineus in Spain, an assessment of the risks presented by other exotic palm weevils for

southern countries has been made by Spanish scientists. Their conclusion was that R. ferrugineus and R. palmarum were the most threatening species.

Damage: Severely attacked palm trees show a total loss of the palms and rotting of the trunk which lead to the death of the tree. Larvae bore tunnels in the trunk.

Where: North America: Mexico.

South America: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Paraguay, Peru, Surinam, Uruguay, Venezuela.

Caribbean and Central America: Belize, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominica, El Salvador, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Guatemala, Honduras, Martinique, Nicaragua, Panama, Puerto Rico, St Vincent, Trinidad and Tobago.

On which plants: Acrocomia aculeata, A. lasiophata, A. sclerocarpa, Attalea coheme, Bactris major, Chrysalidocarpus lustescens, Cocos nucifera, C. coronata, C. fusiformis, C. romanzofiana, C. schizophylla, C. vagans, Desmoncus major, Elaeis guineensis, Euterpe braodwayana, Guilielma spp., Manicaria saccifera, Maximiliana caribaea, Metroxylon, sagu, Oreodoxa oleracea, Phoenix spp., Sabal spp., Washingtonia spp. It can also attack Gynerium saccharoides, S. officinarum, Carica papaya, Jaracatia dodecaphylla, Ananas sativa, Musa spp. and Ricinus spp.

Note: R. palmarum is the vector of the nematode Rhadinaphelenchus cocophilus, causal agent of the red ring disease which has a very serious economic impact on cultivated palm trees in South and Central America.

Pathway: Palmae plants for planting (including date palms and ornamental palms) from infested countries.

Possible risks: Date palms are important crops in northern African countries, and ornamental palms are widely planted in the Mediterranean area. These insects are difficult to detect by simple visual inspections (larvae live inside the plants), and young plants can be infested by eggs or larvae which are also difficult to see.

Source(s): Barranco, P.; de la Peña, J.; Martín, M.M.; Cabello, T. (1998) Eficacia del control químico de la nueva plaga de las palmeras Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (Olivier, 1790) (Col.: Curculionidae). Boletín de Sanidad Vegetal, Plagas, 24(1), 23-40

CABI maps no. 258 & 259.

Esteban-Durán, J.; Yela, J.L.; Beitia-Crespo, F.; Jiménez-Alvarez, A. (1998) Curculiónidos exóticos susceptibles de ser introducidos en España y otros países de la Unión Europa a través de vegetales importados (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Rhynchophorinae). Boletín de Sanidad Vegetal, Plagas, 24(1), 23-40.

García-Hernández JL, Beltrán-Morales F, Loya-Ramírez JG, Morales-Cota JR, Troyo-Diéguez E, Beltrán-Morales FA (2003) [First record of Rhynchophorus palmarum (Coleoptera: Dryophthoridae) in Baja California Sur.] Folia Entomológica Mexicana, 42(3), 415-417. In: Review of Agricultural Entomology 92(11), November 2004, abst. 11410, p 1778.

Sánchez-Soto, S.; Nakano,O. (2002) First record of Rhynchophorus palmarum L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the State of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil. Neotropical Entomology, 31(4), 659-660. In: Review of Agricultural Entomology 91(6), June 2003, abst. 5712, p 899.

EPPO RS 99/012, 2004/100, 2005/033

Panel review date 2005-03 Entry date 1999-01

*****************************************************************************************************************************************************

When we finish the investigation of the dead palm we go check 9 more phoenix canariensis by this palm about 50 meters west.

post-285-066515000 1293587968_thumb.jpg

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Cristóbal

Christima and Mark now find this palm they think also has the insects. Christina takes fotos.

post-285-003434100 1293588531_thumb.jpg

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Cristóbal

We find this insect is in this palm and eat the fronds it is now number 2 palm.

post-285-008314900 1293588702_thumb.jpg

post-285-071838300 1293588722_thumb.jpg

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Cristóbal

I find this palm only for it is in some very busy part of Tijuana with much traffic. Mark and Christina think there are more here and also now in the area of San Diego California - this palm is one kilometer from the border with USA. The insects can fly far.

The USA government authoriteys now start to work with Mexican government authoriteys to try to stop this. For people in southern California now there are 2 dangers - Red Palm Weevil in Laguna Beach and Black Palm Weevil in Tijuana.

The situation now is very serious. In the areas of tropical america there are biologic controls of this insect - in this area, no.

For people in Palmtalk in the area of San Diego please look for palms like this and also how the insects eat the fronds and report what you may be find to Mark and Christina Hoddle.

I am sure there is soon news about this in the meetings for the Red Palm Weevil.

Send to me PM for information of contact for Mark and Christina Hoddle if you see some palm you think also has this insect or the Red Palm Weevil. The symptoms are same.

Edited by Cristóbal

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WestCoastGal

Thanks for the update Cristobal and for the great photos. I was afraid this was going to be the case--turning out positive for R. Palmarum--and I guess I'm not surprised that the Hoddles were able to find more infestation in the immediate area. Yes, it does looks like double trouble for California now. Especially the San Diego area, but at least now people will find out there's a problem to be aware of.

I wonder if the treatment for Red Palm Weevil and this version of weevil is the same.

Regarding the palm that you brought to everyone's attention, I wonder since it now seems dead, what that would indicate for how long it would have been infested in order to reach this state.

Undoubtedly many people went past this tree and noticed it looked diseased. But only you apparently thought to check it out. Thank you. I'm sure your actions will have an impact in this weevils spread in your area and across the border. Your photo documentation has made this very real for all of us.

Edited by WestCoastGal

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Cristóbal

The Hoddles they say palm # 1 is sick for probaly 1-2 years. The dead insects and larva are probaly dead for the rains we have in the last week - they drown.

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Alberto

I wonder if the treatment for Red Palm Weevil and this version of weevil is the same.

Me too!

Thats why I asked it in my post above!:unsure:

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Alberto

Detail on the leaflets

I sprayed and drenched the hole area with Methamidophos.

Could this be a R.palmarum affected CIDP,like the one Cristóbal found?

What do you specialist recomends me to do? I don´t want to loose this palm!:unsure:

THANKS!

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WestCoastGal

The Hoddles they say palm # 1 is sick for probaly 1-2 years. The dead insects and larva are probaly dead for the rains we have in the last week - they drown.

If that's true and the buggers can drown in rainwater, I wonder if that huge multi-million dollar damaging storm Laguna Beach had last week might have done in a bunch of those guys. When I saw the dramatic flood coverage on TV, I recognized the town name thought of the RPW there, and was hoping they got flushed out to sea.

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palmpuppy

These are photos taken of dactylifera and CIDP not far from where we live, about ten to fifteen miles inland from Laguna Beach. We were concerned about the frond tips that appear to have damage in one dactlifera, some damage to a rachis (with leaf tip damage of a dactylifera in the background), and holes bored into one of the CIDPs. Not sure if this means anything (and *truly* hope it doesn't), but thought I'd pass these along just in case...

post-4749-081739700 1293649726_thumb.jpg

post-4749-041917900 1293649765_thumb.jpg

post-4749-016334900 1293649808_thumb.jpg

post-4749-001416000 1293649832_thumb.jpg

more in next posting.......

post-4749-016890800 1293650003_thumb.jpg

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palmpuppy

More photos......

post-4749-064501600 1293650224_thumb.jpg

post-4749-005505400 1293650238_thumb.jpg

post-4749-033555900 1293650270_thumb.jpg

We were concerned about the holes in the cut leaf bases. Not sure what it means.

Jackie

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Ron Vanderhoff

More photos......

post-4749-064501600 1293650224_thumb.jpg

post-4749-005505400 1293650238_thumb.jpg

post-4749-033555900 1293650270_thumb.jpg

We were concerned about the holes in the cut leaf bases. Not sure what it means.

Jackie

These photos look especially troubling - and very suspicious for RPW. This palm needs to be reported to CDFA for further inspection right away. If you send me a private message or email (ronv@rogersgardens.com) I can help you with that or give you the contact info. I may also want to visit the palm myself - I will need the exact location.

Thank you for this report - this is exactly the sort of assistance that CDFA and the other authorities working on this issue need. Great job!

Ron

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palmpuppy

More photos......

We were concerned about the holes in the cut leaf bases. Not sure what it means.

Jackie

These photos look especially troubling - and very suspicious for RPW. This palm needs to be reported to CDFA for further inspection right away. If you send me a private message or email (ronv@rogersgardens.com) I can help you with that or give you the contact info. I may also want to visit the palm myself - I will need the exact location.

Thank you for this report - this is exactly the sort of assistance that CDFA and the other authorities working on this issue need. Great job!

Ron

Hi Ron,

The location is at Saddleback Church in Lake Forest, location is at El Toro and Portola Pkwy (Lake Forest between El Toro and the toll road). The CIDP in the last three photos with the holes is located right at the corner of Saddleback Pkwy and Portola Pkwy.

There are several palms there, several CIDPs look bad. We did not look for stumps to see if any had been cut down. They have almost a forest of CIDP's around their buildings. This place is also sandwiched between palm growers/sellers.

Jackie

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Ron Vanderhoff

More photos......

We were concerned about the holes in the cut leaf bases. Not sure what it means.

Jackie

These photos look especially troubling - and very suspicious for RPW. This palm needs to be reported to CDFA for further inspection right away. If you send me a private message or email (ronv@rogersgardens.com) I can help you with that or give you the contact info. I may also want to visit the palm myself - I will need the exact location.

Thank you for this report - this is exactly the sort of assistance that CDFA and the other authorities working on this issue need. Great job!

Ron

Hi Ron,

The location is at Saddleback Church in Lake Forest, location is at El Toro and Portola Pkwy (Lake Forest between El Toro and the toll road). The CIDP in the last three photos with the holes is located right at the corner of Saddleback Pkwy and Portola Pkwy.

There are several palms there, several CIDPs look bad. We did not look for stumps to see if any had been cut down. They have almost a forest of CIDP's around their buildings. This place is also sandwiched between palm growers/sellers.

Jackie

Thanks Jackie I will visit them in the next day or two and pass along the information to the authorities. Keep looking.

Ron

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palmpuppy

The location (using Laguna Beach as a locator) is indicated with a bright red dot, upper right corner....

(It looks to be about twelve+ miles from Laguna Beach)

post-4749-038774000 1293656101_thumb.jpg

Jackie

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WestCoastGal

Hi Ron,

The location is at Saddleback Church in Lake Forest, location is at El Toro and Portola Pkwy (Lake Forest between El Toro and the toll road). The CIDP in the last three photos with the holes is located right at the corner of Saddleback Pkwy and Portola Pkwy.

There are several palms there, several CIDPs look bad. We did not look for stumps to see if any had been cut down. They have almost a forest of CIDP's around their buildings. This place is also sandwiched between palm growers/sellers.

Jackie

Wow, Jackie. Good eye and investigative work. Assuming the palms at the church are infected, the obvious question is were the church's trees infected from a tree originating from one of the nearby growers/nurseries where maybe an infected palm was imported to. The fact that there are palm growers and sellers nearby is a scary thought (my emphasis added to the above quote). I wouldn't be surprised at all if my local palm nursery in northern California gets palms from southern Cal. Maybe I should start looking up here too for weevils.

I find the investigative work tracking down a primary source location very interesting (not unlike how researchers ultimately tracked down human diseases like the plague and such). This new potential location could change a lot and I'm sure everyone will be all over this area in no time.

Speaking of palms in northern Calif. (SF Bay area), we've seen a number of diseased CIDPs in our travels. I pretty much have chalked most of them up to Fusarium Wilt and/or Pink Rot due to how the lower fronds have looked. With the Calif economy in the state it's in I have noticed a lot of landscaping not looking so great and figure individuals/cities have cut back on watering during the summer. However both my husband and I have noticed a number of CIDPs where the crowns look pretty decimated; and with the RPW sighting in Laguna Beach, we've kind of wondered about them in that light but figured we didn't need to start worrying yet. hmm.

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Cristóbal

If this palm of Palmpuppy has the weevils this is more bad news. 12 miles/20 kilometers away is far from Laguna Beach this is to say the area where theres probaly weevils is to be now very big if this is true.

I agree with Ron the fotos are very suspicious. The hole by the top and the fronds cut this is the thing we need look for.

Every member of palmtalk in this area needs have the eyes open for this every time they go out from the house. We know about palms. The regular person they dont know and dont care.

Edited by Cristóbal

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Ron Vanderhoff

If this palm of Palmpuppy has the weevils this is more bad news. 12 miles/20 kilometers away is far from Laguna Beach this is to say the area where theres probaly weevils is to be now very big if this is true.

I agree with Ron the fotos are very suspicious. The hole by the top and the fronds cut this is the thing we need look for.

Every member of palmtalk in this area needs have the eyes open for this every time they go out from the house. We know about palms. The regular person they dont know and dont care.

I agree with you completely Cristobal. It is palm hobbyists from all over Southern California (and Mexico) that have a very, very good chance of finding other occurrences of these weevils. We are the local people in the field with the expertise to help greatly with this problem. How can we train more palm experts and palm lovers like you and Jackie and Dave and Mats and Matty and Bob and others about what to look for and how to spot these palms? I know there are many others who read this forum and have been following this issue as well who can also help.

We need to mobilize as many resources/people as possible or our love for palms may only be a long-distance affair.

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LJG

These are photos taken of dactylifera and CIDP not far from where we live, about ten to fifteen miles inland from Laguna Beach. We were concerned about the frond tips that appear to have damage in one dactlifera, some damage to a rachis (with leaf tip damage of a dactylifera in the background), and holes bored into one of the CIDPs. Not sure if this means anything (and *truly* hope it doesn't), but thought I'd pass these along just in case...

post-4749-016334900 1293649808_thumb.jpg

post-4749-001416000 1293649832_thumb.jpg

more in next posting.......

This is Fusarium Wilt.

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WestCoastGal

These are photos taken of dactylifera and CIDP not far from where we live, about ten to fifteen miles inland from Laguna Beach. We were concerned about the frond tips that appear to have damage in one dactlifera, some damage to a rachis (with leaf tip damage of a dactylifera in the background), and holes bored into one of the CIDPs. Not sure if this means anything (and *truly* hope it doesn't), but thought I'd pass these along just in case...

post-4749-016334900 1293649808_thumb.jpg

post-4749-001416000 1293649832_thumb.jpg

more in next posting.......

This is Fusarium Wilt.

Hmm. When I look at the dactylifera I see the cut off look to the top of a number of fronds that looks kind of suspicious. And when I look at the CIDP photo, while I see the progression of dead leaves from the bottom up, I'm not seeing in this picture at least, the one-sided death of all the leaflets. I see one or two rachis that have browning and the leaflets on both sides of the rachis seem to be drying up and dying. I thought the one-side pattern was a pretty significant marker for wilt (and at least one other fungal disease of canaries). It's hard to tell from the photo whether the lower part of the trimmed crown might have some holes in it. BTW if you go back and take a look at Ron's post #441 (pg 12) of the third CIDP in Laguna Beach that was identified with RPW and look at the photo of the crown taken from below, I see the lower petioles/rachis' yellowing/browning first before the leaflets also.

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Dypsisdean

These are photos taken of dactylifera and CIDP not far from where we live, about ten to fifteen miles inland from Laguna Beach. We were concerned about the frond tips that appear to have damage in one dactlifera, some damage to a rachis (with leaf tip damage of a dactylifera in the background), and holes bored into one of the CIDPs. Not sure if this means anything (and *truly* hope it doesn't), but thought I'd pass these along just in case...

post-4749-016334900 1293649808_thumb.jpg

post-4749-001416000 1293649832_thumb.jpg

more in next posting.......

This is Fusarium Wilt.

Hmm. When I look at the dactylifera I see the cut off look to the top of a number of fronds that looks kind of suspicious. And when I look at the CIDP photo, while I see the progression of dead leaves from the bottom up, I'm not seeing in this picture at least, the one-sided death of all the leaflets. I see one or two rachis that have browning and the leaflets on both sides of the rachis seem to be drying up and dying. I thought the one-side pattern was a pretty significant marker for wilt (and at least one other fungal disease of canaries). It's hard to tell from the photo whether the lower part of the trimmed crown might have some holes in it. BTW if you go back and take a look at Ron's post #441 (pg 12) of the third CIDP in Laguna Beach that was identified with RPW and look at the photo of the crown taken from below, I see the lower petioles/rachis' yellowing/browning first before the leaflets also.

I donʻt think the two are mutually exclusive. In fact, wouldnʻt RPW be more prone to attack a CIDP already suffering from fusarium?

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Mats

Ron, Saddleback Church has a grouping of 7 CIDPs at the Portola entrance across from the old Armstrong nursery. Last Spring I noticed that they had replaced one with a dactylifera. I went to look again and see they've replaced anther one - so recently that its watering berm is still intact. Saddleback has a huge problem with Fusarium though out their complex and I suspect they are finding that replacing them with more CIDPs is prohibitively expensive and as a result are going with dactyliferas.

Anyway, if Jackie's dactylifera is indeed a case of red palm weevil, you might want to find out who their arborist is and ask them if the CIDP they replaced a year ago was indeed infected with Fusarium or if it was possibly RPW as well.

You know Instant Jungle has a large yard right across Portola Pkwy from the church. They mostly deal in large Queens, Kings, Chamaerops and Robellinis - palmwise - but they do move the occasional large Phoenix through there. They've got a couple 48+" boxed CIDPs and Reclinatas right now, as a matter of fact.

Not to cast aspersions, but if there is RPW in the area, them moving large plants in and out could be a possible vector...

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MattyB

This all makes sense now. If those P. dactyliferas are relatively new, often they top the fronds while they're still tied up. Looks at how many fronds are neatly trimmed at the tips. This is what's going on I bet. Hopefully we're looking at Fusarium on the CIDPs and transplant trimming on the Dacts. That's my hopefull assessment.

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LJG

These are photos taken of dactylifera and CIDP not far from where we live, about ten to fifteen miles inland from Laguna Beach. We were concerned about the frond tips that appear to have damage in one dactlifera, some damage to a rachis (with leaf tip damage of a dactylifera in the background), and holes bored into one of the CIDPs. Not sure if this means anything (and *truly* hope it doesn't), but thought I'd pass these along just in case...

post-4749-016334900 1293649808_thumb.jpg

post-4749-001416000 1293649832_thumb.jpg

more in next posting.......

This is Fusarium Wilt.

Hmm. When I look at the dactylifera I see the cut off look to the top of a number of fronds that looks kind of suspicious. And when I look at the CIDP photo, while I see the progression of dead leaves from the bottom up, I'm not seeing in this picture at least, the one-sided death of all the leaflets. I see one or two rachis that have browning and the leaflets on both sides of the rachis seem to be drying up and dying. I thought the one-side pattern was a pretty significant marker for wilt (and at least one other fungal disease of canaries). It's hard to tell from the photo whether the lower part of the trimmed crown might have some holes in it. BTW if you go back and take a look at Ron's post #441 (pg 12) of the third CIDP in Laguna Beach that was identified with RPW and look at the photo of the crown taken from below, I see the lower petioles/rachis' yellowing/browning first before the leaflets also.

I was referring to the CIDP. I cut out the Dac pics in my reply. That CIDP has FW and the fact Mats states that area has been hit heavily with FW proves this further for me. Since you can not replace a CIDP with another after FW, you must use a Dac.

I have no idea about the others and RPW but if we keep sending botonist on FW cases it limits their effectiness due to the limited time they have. Also I can find about 100 FW CIDPs in SD alone. So I am sure their are many more in OC and LA. It is very important to be vigilant now but we must also be smart.

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LJG

These are photos taken of dactylifera and CIDP not far from where we live, about ten to fifteen miles inland from Laguna Beach. We were concerned about the frond tips that appear to have damage in one dactlifera, some damage to a rachis (with leaf tip damage of a dactylifera in the background), and holes bored into one of the CIDPs. Not sure if this means anything (and *truly* hope it doesn't), but thought I'd pass these along just in case...

post-4749-016334900 1293649808_thumb.jpg

post-4749-001416000 1293649832_thumb.jpg

more in next posting.......

This is Fusarium Wilt.

Hmm. When I look at the dactylifera I see the cut off look to the top of a number of fronds that looks kind of suspicious. And when I look at the CIDP photo, while I see the progression of dead leaves from the bottom up, I'm not seeing in this picture at least, the one-sided death of all the leaflets. I see one or two rachis that have browning and the leaflets on both sides of the rachis seem to be drying up and dying. I thought the one-side pattern was a pretty significant marker for wilt (and at least one other fungal disease of canaries). It's hard to tell from the photo whether the lower part of the trimmed crown might have some holes in it. BTW if you go back and take a look at Ron's post #441 (pg 12) of the third CIDP in Laguna Beach that was identified with RPW and look at the photo of the crown taken from below, I see the lower petioles/rachis' yellowing/browning first before the leaflets also.

I donʻt think the two are mutually exclusive. In fact, wouldnʻt RPW be more prone to attack a CIDP already suffering from fusarium?

Dean this is a good question to ask a botanist familiar with this. I would bet they would be. Why? The larvae need fresh plant material to survive. Fusarium is all dead plant material. Also, they are attracted to freshly cut live material in general from what I have read. A tree dying of FW probably does not meet this requirement. Also, I bet these bugs would avoid an infected tree - you know the whole survival of species thing.

Now a tree that was pruned could get hit with RPW and FW but I would wager a guess the RPW will show damage faster then FW? This is what I would be curious of for those in Europe that are going through this.

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Mats

This all makes sense now. If those P. dactyliferas are relatively new, often they top the fronds while they're still tied up. Looks at how many fronds are neatly trimmed at the tips. This is what's going on I bet. Hopefully we're looking at Fusarium on the CIDPs and transplant trimming on the Dacts. That's my hopefull assessment.

Bingo! You're smarter than me Matty. I didn't put two and two together ... those are the same dactyliferas - my photo is just from further away. And yes, those pruned tips are from the transplant. Btw, they've got two more Fusarium infected CIDPs 100 yds. from this one in the photo.

Len, so how does Fusarium work? It's usually transmitted through pruning tools, right? Does it then move to the soil? Is that area always contaminated and unsuitable for more CIDPs?

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