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Red Palm weevils found in Laguna Beach, CA

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Ron Vanderhoff

Here are a few more pictures of the CIDP on Pacific Coast Highway. This is the third palm in California to be confirmed as infested with Red Palm Weevil.

The palm from PCH:

post-5063-039422600 1291501754_thumb.jpg

Several pictures from all different directiond show what looks like a very healthy Phoenix canariensis. Congratulations to the state detection crews for finding this palm. Per Nick Nisson ground crews on foot noticed that the tree had very subtle notching in older leaves that were similar to known RPW damage. Wow, this makes our job, trying to locate other infested palms, a difficult one.

post-5063-011885100 1291501750_thumb.jpg post-5063-089894400 1291501744_thumb.jpg post-5063-075011500 1291501739_thumb.jpg

Looking up the trunk:

post-5063-031508100 1291501734_thumb.jpg

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Mats

Here are a few more pictures of the CIDP on Pacific Coast Highway. This is the third palm in California to be confirmed as infested with Red Palm Weevil.

That palm is a beauty! It'll be interesting to see how they treat this. Do you think they will use the sanitation method Michel advocates or will it be something less invasive?

Let's hope Mr. Hodel is correct when he says, "At this time, the infestation appears to be confined to a relatively small area of LB and does not yet seem to be rapidly spreading."

I'll be more reassured after they've inspected and cleared those suspicious palms Ron found down by the Ole Hanson Beach Club in San Clemente.

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gyuseppe

if the situation is out of control ,I am very concerned about the california,

in three years have died 80% of Phoenix canariensis in my city :(

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DoomsDave

if the situation is out of control ,I am very concerned about the california,

in three years have died 80% of Phoenix canariensis in my city :(

We'll do what we can.

We won't give up easily.

Hmm. Weevil pate, anyone?

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Ferry

I am appalled to see that once more (Hodel message to Ron Vanderhoff in Palmtalk 03/12/10) is repeated this erroneous idea that keeping palms in healthy conditions could avoid or reduce RPW infestation. RPW is perfectly capable to infest well cared Phoenix canariensis. The infestation of Phoenix canariensis by this pest (as in part for other palm species) is not at all based on the prior existence of wounds.

Any palms owner of public or private gardens in infested municipalities of southern Europe knows perfectly that the good state of their palms had not permitted at all to avoid their infestation. Examples that demonstrate that RPW can perfectly infest well cared Phoenix canariensis can unfortunately be counted now by hundreds of thousands in Southern Europe. More than three years ago, we have established the main modality of infestation of adult Phoenix canariensis that clearly demonstrates how palms, well cared or not, are infested (4 published papers).

I am desperate to see than, after five years of experience of this pest, the cliché that RPW will infest principally wounded or stressed palms is still repeated despite clear evidence that it is seriously false.

Furthermore, confusion is once more operated between attraction and infestation. Once more, I repeat than even if RPW will be more attracted by recently (short preferential time attraction) pruned or wounded palms the final number of infested palms will not be different. The only difference will be that the percentage of infested palms will be higher for the pruned palms.

I can understand that CFDA officers or californian scientists who are not yet familiar with this pest repeat this cliché because for other palms species this idea, even if it is in many cases questionable, is generally admitted. Nevertheless, I can’t accept that the European supposed experts that CFDA has called to advise them did not refute definitely this information regarding RPW and Phoenix canariensis. The consequences of such erroneous understanding of RPW infestation modalities are dramatic because it leads to adopt wrong management decisions.

Between them, it is the one concerning pruning banning. I am very surprised to see that Hodel himself recommends not to prune excepted dry leaves! Has he not been informed that the majority of the palms that have been detected before presenting evident symptoms of infestation were discovered thanks to trimmers’ activity? Has he not been informed that the first visible symptoms of infestation are located at the base of the inner leaves impossible to see without pruning to create inspection windows? Has he not been informed that well care palms presenting not any single visible sign of infestation could be in fact deeply infested?

Has he not been informed that most of the European plant protection authorities, ignoring field evidence and infestation modalities, have banned pruning outside the winter period? Does Hodel ignore that one of the dramatic consequences of this measure has been that infested palms were discovered when they were already greatly infested and had released hundreds of weevils?

Are the European experts called by CFDA the same that are responsible of the catastrophic results obtained in Europe by the plant protection authorities?

I know that between these experts there is one who is the principal adviser of the plant protection authority of Valencia Region. For this region, I give here after some recent news (only for the last five weeks!) regarding the results of the seriously erroneous policy adopted by the plant protection authority during five years:

- 25/10/10: RPW arrives at El Campello (http://www.diarioinformacion.com/alicanti/2010/10/24/plaga-picudo-llega-campello/1057411.html)

- 28/10/10: RPW passes barriers http://www.lasprovincias.es/v/20101028/alicante/picudo-rojo-salta-barrera-20101028.html

- 08/11/10: RPW invades Benidorm and la Vila (http://www.diarioinformacion.com/benidorm/2010/11/08/picudo-rojo-invade-benidorm-vila/1062438.html)

- 09/11/10: Wind falls down an infested palm http://www.laverdad.es/murcia/20101109/local/cartagena/viento-derriba-palmera-calle-201011091233.html

- 12/11/10: Alert: new infested palms in Catral http://www.laverdad.es/alicante/v/20101112/orihuela/psoe-catral-alerta-nuevos-20101112.html

- 14/11/10: RPW extension to the whole littoral (http://www.diarioinformacion.com/vega-baja/2010/11/14/plaga-picudo-rojo-propaga-litoral-alcanza-alicante/1064767.html)

- 18/11/10: RPW arrives in Alicante (http://www.diarioinformacion.com/alicante/2010/11/18/picudo-rojo-entra-alicante-obliga-tratar-16000-palmeras/1066109.html)

- 21/11/10: RPW wins the war http://www.laverdad.es/murcia/v/20101121/region/picudo-gana-guerra-20101121.html

- 23/11/10: Denia fears that RPW destroys all its palms (http://www.levante-emv.com/comarcas/2010/11/23/denia-teme-picudo-rojo-acabe-anos-palmeras/759481.html)

- 24/11/10: 1600 palms have been eliminated (http://www.ideal.es/agencias/20101124/economia/unas-1.600-palmeras-sido-destruidas_201011241604.html)

- 24/11/10: RPW surrounds historic palm grove of San Anton (http://www.diarioinformacion.com/vega-baja/2010/11/24/plaga-picudo-rojo-cerca-palmeral-historico-san-anton/1068331.html)

- 25/11/10: RPW arrives at Hondo park (http://www.diarioinformacion.com/elche/2010/11/25/plaga-llega-parque-natural-hondo/1068688.html)

- 27/11/10: RPW arrives at Mutxamel (http://www.diarioinformacion.com/alicanti/2010/11/27/picudo-llega-mutxamel-agricultura-retira-primera-palmera-parque-canyar/1069540.html)

- 27/11/10: Extension RPW in Calatayud park (http://www.diarioinformacion.com/elda/2010/11/27/eu-alerta-peligro-contagio-picudo-rojo-parque-doctor-calatayud/1069591.html)

- 28/11/10: RPW pest obliges to eliminate 10.000 palms (http://www.lasprovincias.es/v/20101128/alicante/plaga-picudo-obliga-eliminar-20101128.html)

- 28/11/10: Elche palm grove world heritage in danger (http://www.diarioinformacion.com/opinion/2010/11/28/palmeral-patrimonio-humanidad-peligro/1069823.html)

- 01/12/10: RPW arrives in Desert les Palmes (http://www.levante-emv.com/castello/2010/12/01/plaga-picudo-rojo-llega-desert-les-palmes/761832.html)

- 02/12/10: They uproots 160 palms in one year because of RPW (http://www.diarioinformacion.com/vega-baja/2010/12/02/arrancan-160-palmeras-afectadas-picudo-rojo-ano/1071296.html)

- 03/12/10: Vila leaves palm grove dying because of RPW (http://www.diarioinformacion.com/benidorm/2010/12/03/vila-deja-morir-palmeral-parque-publico-picudo/1071689.html)

- 06/12/10: Platform for defense of the “Huerta” denounces that RPW circulate at high speed and without control (http://www.laverdad.es/alicante/v/20101206/orihuela/plataforma-defensa-huerta-denuncia-20101206.html)

- 06/12/10: Environment and agriculture association wants that justice investigates responsibilities for the extension of the pest (http://www.laverdad.es/murcia/v/20101206/murcia/huermur-quiere-tribunales-investiguen-20101206.html)

Unfortunately similar disastrous information can be found for other Spanish, Italian or French regions. All the plant protection authorities in Europe have adopted as model the totally wrong policy and technical measures, based on great ignorance of the pest and of the palms, established by Valencia region administration and its associated scientists.

Consequently, in Valencia region as well as in other European regions, the landscape is now horribly stricken in most of the municipalities. The few municipalities that were still free of the pest are now seriously affected. Adult Date palms are now infested and risk of brutal palms falls down (see one of the news) increases.

Suppression and containment policies have totally failed as we predicted since 2005. The radical change of policy and the correction of serious mistakes spread on palms and RPW biology, that we claim for 5 years has been rejected by Valencia authority. Despite increasing evidences of their erroneous strategy, they have refused to modify it for fear to have to admit their quite insufficient knowledge and understanding of the palms, the pest and the global and specific context in which this pest was acting. To try to save face, to minimize their responsibility in the disaster and to justify tens of millions of Euros wasted in vain, they pretend now that no efficient tool exists yet to control this pest and that we have to wait for new research results. Meanwhile we have to cohabit with the pest as it has been publically proposed by Valencia experts and politicians! If the issue was not so serious, such affirmation makes us just laughing.

I deeply hope that Californian authorities will not follow the Valencia example.

Regards.

Michel

Michel Ferry

Researcher of the INRA France

Scientific director

Phoenix Research Station

Apartado 996

03201 Elche

Spain

Mobil: 34628038938

Fax 34965423706

Email: m.ferry@telefonica.net ou m.ferry@vodafone.es

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Ferry

Regarding the third detected palm, I am nearly sure that this palm is no more infested (of course checking by opening a window inspection should be realized urgently. Don't forget that the first objective of sanitation is not to save the palm but to eliminate pest dispersion source). If it is confirmed that remaining coccon and weevil correspond to RPW, this infestation took place long time ago and did not well succeed. On the basis of one hundred sanitized Phoenix canariensis, 8 to 10 succeed to reject RPW either because the larvae died before the first cycle acheives or because new adult generation prefers to look for other palms. Phoenix canariensis even if their resistance to infestation is much lower than date palms present a certain capacity to resist to infestation (resins production and other unknown molecules).

Regarding the importance of infestation in Laguna Beach I would be much more prudent that Hodel. We have plenty of examples that demonstrate that what seems at the beginning a small focus reveales later as a very important one. The fact that the two first detected infested palms were treated when they had already liberated most of their adults constitutes a very bad signal. Furthermore, if no effort is done to really look for the weevil instead of waiting for visible symptoms, I am affraid that we could have bad surprises in the next future.

So better to spread too much alarm than to much quietness. Mobilisation and training must be increase a lot to assure the control of this pest.

Regards.

Michel

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Charles Wychgel

I am appalled to see that once more (Hodel message to Ron Vanderhoff in Palmtalk 03/12/10) is repeated this erroneous idea that keeping palms in healthy conditions could avoid or reduce RPW infestation. RPW is perfectly capable to infest well cared Phoenix canariensis. The infestation of Phoenix canariensis by this pest (as in part for other palm species) is not at all based on the prior existence of wounds.

Any palms owner of public or private gardens in infested municipalities of southern Europe knows perfectly that the good state of their palms had not permitted at all to avoid their infestation. Examples that demonstrate that RPW can perfectly infest well cared Phoenix canariensis can unfortunately be counted now by hundreds of thousands in Southern Europe. More than three years ago, we have established the main modality of infestation of adult Phoenix canariensis that clearly demonstrates how palms, well cared or not, are infested (4 published papers).

I am desperate to see than, after five years of experience of this pest, the cliché that RPW will infest principally wounded or stressed palms is still repeated despite clear evidence that it is seriously false.

Thanks for pointing this out Michel, this is just what happened to my CIDP, we discovered the RPW infestation only when the trimmers came

I had trimmed the tree in March and had not seen any signs of infestation even after careful observation....I kept a close watch on the tree all summer...nothing....made an appointment with the trimmers beginning of November..... bingo the tree had been infested

This plague is really acting fast..a few months after initial entry of the RPW the tree could be doomed

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John in Andalucia

..even if RPW will be more attracted by recently (short preferential time attraction) pruned or wounded palms the final number of infested palms will not be different. The only difference will be that the percentage of infested palms will be higher for the pruned palms.

If so, shouldn't the pruned trees be restricted to those that are under observation by the authorities? This comes back to my point about pruned palms on private property that cannot be easily accessed.

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mlovecan

Regarding the third detected palm, I am nearly sure that this palm is no more infested (of course checking by opening a window inspection should be realized urgently. Don't forget that the first objective of sanitation is not to save the palm but to eliminate pest dispersion source). If it is confirmed that remaining coccon and weevil correspond to RPW, this infestation took place long time ago and did not well succeed. On the basis of one hundred sanitized Phoenix canariensis, 8 to 10 succeed to reject RPW either because the larvae died before the first cycle acheives or because new adult generation prefers to look for other palms.

Michel,

That's quite an observation about the third detected palm! The fact the palm was infected far enough in the past to have spent cocoons, yet displays very little sign of infestation makes perfect sense. I have observed about 5% of our CIDP's continue to thrive despite being surrounded by CIDP's that have long since succumbed and never been removed.

I didn't realise these trees may have been infected at one time yet later rejected by the pest. Do you believe this is a genetic trait that could be potentially passed on to create a strain of RPW-resistant CIDP?

Regards

Maurice

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gyuseppe

from my experience I can say that phoenix canariensis pruned and phoenix canariensis non pruned,for me is always the same ,the red palm usually attack

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greekpalm

Regarding the third detected palm, I am nearly sure that this palm is no more infested (of course checking by opening a window inspection should be realized urgently. Don't forget that the first objective of sanitation is not to save the palm but to eliminate pest dispersion source). If it is confirmed that remaining coccon and weevil correspond to RPW, this infestation took place long time ago and did not well succeed. On the basis of one hundred sanitized Phoenix canariensis, 8 to 10 succeed to reject RPW either because the larvae died before the first cycle acheives or because new adult generation prefers to look for other palms.

Michel,

That's quite an observation about the third detected palm! The fact the palm was infected far enough in the past to have spent cocoons, yet displays very little sign of infestation makes perfect sense. I have observed about 5% of our CIDP's continue to thrive despite being surrounded by CIDP's that have long since succumbed and never been removed.

I didn't realise these trees may have been infected at one time yet later rejected by the pest. Do you believe this is a genetic trait that could be potentially passed on to create a strain of RPW-resistant CIDP?

Regards

Maurice

There is a change this is true. but i don't think so... compare it to the smell of a cake.. some cakes smell better then others but if someone is really hungry and doesn't want to die,, well he'll eat (almost) everything.Well the weevils might be attracted to the tasty cakes... but once most of the CIDP are exterminated they will destroy the less "tasty" ones also.

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DoomsDave

Michel's observations make it imperative to begin a program of prophylaxis now, even if you're not in a known infested area.

Time to get implants, oh back to the 80's again . . . .

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Ron Vanderhoff

The Center for Invasive Species Research (CISR), at UC Riverside has just posted an important update on their online blog. I encourage each of you to take a look.

CISR Blog

This blog provides an update on last weeks Technical Working Group meetings as well as the discovery of the third RPW infested Phooenix canariensis in Laguna Beach.

Ron

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phoenixbob

I found the scientific paper that established that the "red stripe" palm weevil (formerly known as R. vulneratus) is the same species as the red palm weevil R. ferrugineus.

I thought it interesting. It does seem to indicated that the red stripe versions, such as those found in Laguna Beach, were naturally most commonly found in southeast Asia - Indonesia, New Guinea, Thailand, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Taiwan. My guess is that this doesn't mean a whole lot, but perhaps it is an indication that this infestation came across the Pacific in an imported palm, and not from Europe or the Middle East.

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MattyB

Or someone thought they'd bring home a cool bug. Or it hitch-hiked

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DoomsDave

The Center for Invasive Species Research (CISR), at UC Riverside has just posted an important update on their online blog. I encourage each of you to take a look.

CISR Blog

This blog provides an update on last weeks Technical Working Group meetings as well as the discovery of the third RPW infested Phooenix canariensis in Laguna Beach.

Ron

Thanks for keeping us posted!

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Ron Vanderhoff

I took one more look this morning at the Phoenix canariensis in Laguna Beach that was found about ten days ago with a RPW infestation. I wanted to look again for the leaf damage that CDFA ground crews said alerted them to the possibiliity of this infestion. Here's what I saw:

Looks like some possible larval feeding damage to the tips of these leaves:

post-5063-098534200 1292092041_thumb.jpg

Possibly more feeding:

post-5063-073856100 1292092038_thumb.jpg

When looking at Phoenix a good pair of binoculars really help. Although these are older leaves, I suspect this might be what tipped them. Since the palm is very tall, it is difficult to get a very good view of the top emerging leaves.

Ron

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gyuseppe
Looks like some possible larval feeding damage to the tips of these leaves:

no ron,the larvae Do not eat tips of leaves

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Ron Vanderhoff

Looks like some possible larval feeding damage to the tips of these leaves:

no ron,the larvae Do not eat tips of leaves

I had seen some images elsewhere of leaf tips that were fed upon as they were emerging from the crown, not once mature as these are. The tips appeared to be chewed off. When I looked at this palm my suspicion was that these might have been eaten quite some time ago, when they were quite young and just emerging. Would that be possible?

Ron

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MattyB

I think that is possible Ron because I've seen the photos from Europe. Those leaves were emerging spears a long time ago which means the weevil was in there for a year at least.

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Ferry

With the eaten leaves tips Ron has clearly detected a symptom that could be perfectly attributed to the RPW. Sometimes rats produce similar symptoms except that the cut appear generally a bit chewed or irregular when it is due to rats when it is normally perfectly straight when it is due to RPW larvae.

As said by Ron, such symptoms when produced by RPW appear long time after larvae action, when the leaves where still hidden (larvae are not going outside because they can survive). What surprise me in the case of this palm is that, if these symptoms correspond to RPW, this palm was infested several years before. It needs 5 to 7 years for an inner leaf to reach that external position (just before drying).

I would really like to have confirmation that the cocoon found by CFDA corresponds really to RPW. Other non pest insects frequent on palms (living in the dead and rot leaves bases. Various beetles like cetonia) construct cocoons similar to the RPW but smaller.

The found cocoon as the symptoms detected by Ron correspond to old leaves. If the found cocoon is from RPW, that means that this palm (where RPW did not survive more than one biological cycle) was infested several years ago!

Michel

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Ron Vanderhoff

A Red Palm Weevil informational meeting has called for December 21st.

post-5063-076722900 1292263637_thumb.jpg

The meeting is being coordinated by Dr. Cheryl Wilen and includes USDA, CDFA, University of CA Cooperative Extension and University of CA IPM. It will be held at the UC South Coast Research and Experiment Station in Irvine. There will actually be three separate meetings & presentations, in order to better accommodate the attendees schedules.

Registration is required for these meetings.

I strongly encourage IPS and PSSC members interested in this issue to attend one of these meetings. I checked with Dr. Kabashima and palm society member are welcome. I suspect that almost any palm enthusiast in California should be very interested in this issue. Several members have been contributing to this post and likely many others have been following the posts silently. I firmly believe our Palm Society's should take a strong leadership position in this issue.

Thus far, IPS and PSSC members have been significant allies to the researchers working on this issue and I believe there should be more to come. Palm society members have the opportunity to demonstrate their assistance on this threat and could be especially useful in two areas:

Helping to bridge the gap between research activities and the public palm owner.

Helping to detect additional potential Palm Weevil infested palms.

Now is the time for Palm Society leadership and cooperation.

Here is the UC notification of the meeting:

UC RPW meeting notice

Here is the registration link. Remember, there are three duplicate sessions, 7:30-9:300am, 10:00-12:00am and 1:00-3:00pm:

Meeting Registration

Here is an additional flier about the meeting:

http://www.ufei.org/files/news/2010/RedPalmWeevil12-2010.pdf

I do not have a specific agenda for the meetings yet, but have an email in to Dr. Wilen. When I get more information I will post it here.

See you all on the 21st.

Ron

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Ron Vanderhoff

Goood news!

I just recieved an update from Nick Nisson, our county entomologist.

CDFA detection personnel have completed inspections of the trees in front of Franks Auto in San Clemente, the trees on Avenida Pico in San Clemente and the trees near the Ole Hanson Beach Club in San Clemente, as well as the tree on the Mission Lane property in Huntington Beach.

The initial examinations did not find any physical evidence of RPW at these properties. That's great news.

If you've forgoten, here's a reminder of the trees in question.

The trees on El Camino Real, near Ave Comello in San Clemente:

post-5063-020723500 1292289785_thumb.jpg

I do not have a photo of the trees on Ave. Pico in San Clemente.

The trees near the Ole Hanson Beach Club in San Clemente:

post-5063-000469500 1292289690_thumb.jpg

The tree in Huntinigton Beach:

post-5063-003538200 1292289273_thumb.jpg

Nick thanks us for reporting these suspects.

Ron

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Ron Vanderhoff

A Red Palm Weevil informational meeting has called for December 21st.

post-5063-076722900 1292263637_thumb.jpg

The meeting is being coordinated by Dr. Cheryl Wilen and includes USDA, CDFA, University of CA Cooperative Extension and University of CA IPM. It will be held at the UC South Coast Research and Experiment Station in Irvine. There will actually be three separate meetings & presentations, in order to better accommodate the attendees schedules.

Registration is required for these meetings.

I strongly encourage IPS and PSSC members interested in this issue to attend one of these meetings. I checked with Dr. Kabashima and palm society member are welcome. I suspect that almost any palm enthusiast in California should be very interested in this issue. Several members have been contributing to this post and likely many others have been following the posts silently. I firmly believe our Palm Society's should take a strong leadership position in this issue.

Thus far, IPS and PSSC members have been significant allies to the researchers working on this issue and I believe there should be more to come. Palm society members have the opportunity to demonstrate their assistance on this threat and could be especially useful in two areas:

Helping to bridge the gap between research activities and the public palm owner.

Helping to detect additional potential Palm Weevil infested palms.

Now is the time for Palm Society leadership and cooperation.

Here is the UC notification of the meeting:

UC RPW meeting notice

Here is the registration link. Remember, there are three duplicate sessions, 7:30-9:300am, 10:00-12:00am and 1:00-3:00pm:

Meeting Registration

Here is an additional flier about the meeting:

http://www.ufei.org/files/news/2010/RedPalmWeevil12-2010.pdf

I do not have a specific agenda for the meetings yet, but have an email in to Dr. Wilen. When I get more information I will post it here.

See you all on the 21st.

Ron

I just recieved some information from Dr. Cheryl Wilen about the agenda for the Dec. 21st meetings.

The agenda for the meetings are

• Introduction and background - John Kabashima (10 min)

• Identification and lifecycle - Nick Nisson (5-10 min)

• Damage symptoms - Don Hodel (25 min)

• Treatment and best management practices. - Cheryl Wilen (20-25 min)

• Trapping, monitoring, and regulations. Laura Petro, CDFA (20-25 min)

• Questions to Panel - (20-25 min)

This meeting is primarily for landscapers but certainly people that would notice "weird" growth patterns are welcome. Each session only holds 60 people but it does not appear any are full yet.

Ron

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Ferry

I realize that I have been unfair with Canary Islands administration when I have forgotten to signal that the terrible disaster of the urban landscape caused by wrong Plant Protection Organizations strategy to control the Red Palm Weevil concerns all the south European regions except Canary Islands. I want to repair this oversight.

In Canary Islands, thanks to the work of Rosa Pilar Martín’s team, the eradication of the red palm weevil will probably be successful. The number of detected infested palms has decreased strongly between 2006 and 2010. Only few infested palms have been detected in 2010.

It is interesting to analyze why so different results have been obtained between Canary Islands and other European regions and especially Valencia one’s.

First of all it should be emphasized that Phoenix canariensis is an emblematic plant for Canary Islands as it is endemic, constitutes spectacular wild forest and is used for centuries by the islands inhabitants. After the first discovery of infested palms, an extraordinary mobilization took immediately place, originated by environmental and cultural groups and intensively relayed by TV, radio and news papers media. Thanks to this strong mobilization the total prohibition of palms movement from infested islands to RPW free islands was obtained after 14 months of difficult and intensive fight against the measure adopted by the plant protection authority in March 2006.

In comparison, seven years after the first detected infested palms (beginning of 2004), palms import and movement remain allow in Valencia region…except at 5 km of Elche and few other palm groves! I don’t know if this information was communicated to the RPW in Spanish or Catalan. In Valencia area as well as in other regions of Europe, plant protection authorities have been mainly worried by the possible consequences of phytosanitary measures on the trade and nursery activities, at the expense of the preservation of the existing palms patrimony. In fact, this distinction between these two aspects was totally wrong on the medium term. The palm trade and nursery sector is now also dramatically affected by the pest. RPW is no more capable to understand Catalan language than to distinguish between nursery palms and private or public gardens palms.

In Canary Islands, because of the “social” and consequently political importance of the Phoenix canariensis , the regional government decided to attribute important extra funds to eradicate the pest since the first year (1,5 millions in 2006). Nearly 8 millions of Euros have been spend during the last 5 years. It’s a lot of money to control only 5 spots but at least the pest will be probably eradicated. In comparison, Valencia region has wasted more than 20 millions of Euros totally in vain.

This difference is not surprising as Canary Island Plant Protection Administration acted with the determined objective to eradicate the pest when Valencia Regional Government assured since 2005 that there is no other choice than to learn to cohabitate with the pest! This message was the main one publically spread after the International meeting organized by IVIA in Valencia in November 2005.

In addition to this opposite approach, an important difference exists between Canary Islands and Valencia Region. In Canary Islands, the number of initial detected spots has been very low in comparison with Valencia Region.

Valencia region constituted traditionally the main place in Europe for international palms trade and nursery activities. In Elche itself without counting the 200.000 date palms of the protected palm grove, the total number of palms in the nurseries (essentially Phoenix) was evaluated in 2005 at 1 million. Furthermore, hundreds of thousands palms have been imported from Egypt to this region and then redistributed to whole Europe. Consequently a large number of infested palms have been introduced and scattered in Europe but also in the Region itself (huge housing boom) region during several years.

With a high initial number of infested places and an enormous number of ornamental palms (nurseries, public and private gardens) to check and to treat, the budget to dedicate to eradication with the approach adopted in Canary islands (total control by administration) would have been monstrous. It is precisely because that it was totally impossible that Valencia administration, even with three time more money than in Canary islands, check and treat all the existing palms that the failure has been so terrible in Valencia Region.

Now, to finish two questions:

- how much money California administration is ready to waste rapidly to control this pest? As much as Canary Islands region?

- how large is the infested area in Laguna beach and perhaps in other areas of California?

This last question leads to another one: are many ornamental palms been imported in California during the last 5 years and are many palms been planted in Laguna beach during the last 2 to 3 years?

I don’t think that the situation is similar than the one in many southern European regions where the housing boom has been explosive for the last ten years. On the other side, the presently detected palms have released hundreds of weevils.

Nevertheless, my impression is that if intensive and right awareness and training are implemented quickly, eradication could be obtained very quickly (I mean in less than one year!) and, consequently, at a very low cost.

Best regards.

Michel

Michel Ferry

Researcher of the INRA France

Scientific director

Phoenix Research Station

Apartado 996

03201 Elche

Spain

Mobil: 34628038938

Fax 34965423706

Email: m.ferry@telefonica.net ou m.ferry@vodafone.es

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Ron Vanderhoff

Yesterday Christina Hoddle posted a very humbling commentary about RPW, following her recent visit to the south of France where thhe pest was first reported in 2004. Her comments are posted on the Center for Invasive Species Research (CISR) blog here:

CISR Blog

If we fail to get this pest eliminated from California, her comments paint a not-so-rosy picture. She details some of the political and bureaucratic hurdles that France has been struggling with regarding this pest, as well as some very good pictures.

Ron

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WestCoastGal

Once again Ron, thanks for keeping us informed and posting the link. It is so disheartening to see those beautiful Canaries turned into totem poles. A sobering trip to France for sure.

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Enzo

Which is exact location of traps?

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Ron Vanderhoff

Which is exact location of traps?

There are about 1,500 traps spread through a nine square mile area surrounding the three positive RPW finds in Laguna Beach.

Ron

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DoomsDave

Once again Ron, thanks for keeping us informed and posting the link. It is so disheartening to see those beautiful Canaries turned into totem poles. A sobering trip to France for sure.

With ACTION, that needn't happen.

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Cristóbal

I talk with Christine and Mark Hoddle in the telephone in this week they are to come to Tijuana Sunday 26 december 11 AM for the weevil and cocoons i have in the freezer to do the test of the dna and to see the palm and look for more weevils and cocoons. When i meet them i take them also to go see other phoenix canariensis in the area about 100 meters from this palm there are many.

Mark says the type of red weevil they find in Laguna Beach is from south east Asia, not of the type they find in Europe. He thinks it is possible it comes in some ship or may be some person from this area bring the weevil as food for family members they eat the babys of the weevil like candy in some areas there.

If the weevil i find is R. ferrugineus this is very bad. It is very possible the dead weevil i find is in the sun for many months and is now black.

If the weevil i find is R. palmarum this is also very bad it does the same thing to the palms and is now probaly in southern california you can walk to USA from where i find this palm and weevil. If this is what happen there are now 2 types of weevil for them to worry. R palmarum they find before in south Baja California but never in this part of the peninsula or California USA.

This weevil and cocoons they are to take to USA for tests of the dna and than when they have this information they are to notify the correct persons in our government. I think it is very possible in one cocoon theres pupa it is very heavey but i dont open it.

I am very sorry to say all of this is bad.

Edited by Cristóbal

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BS Man about Palms

Thanks again Cristobal for your work.

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Enzo
Which is exact location of traps?

There are about 1,500 traps spread through a nine square mile area surrounding the three positive RPW finds in Laguna Beach.

Ron

Thanks Ron,

I was referring to the position of the trap:

- near or far the palm

- how high? or on the ground?

etc.

Thanks to all in advance

Greetings

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DoomsDave

I talk with Christine and Mark Hoddle in the telephone in this week they are to come to Tijuana Sunday 26 december 11 AM for the weevil and cocoons i have in the freezer to do the test of the dna and to see the palm and look for more weevils and cocoons. When i meet them i take them also to go see other phoenix canariensis in the area about 100 meters from this palm there are many.

Mark says the type of red weevil they find in Laguna Beach is from south east Asia, not of the type they find in Europe. He thinks it is possible it comes in some ship or may be some person from this area bring the weevil as food for family members they eat the babys of the weevil like candy in some areas there.

If the weevil i find is R. ferrugineus this is very bad. It is very possible the dead weevil i find is in the sun for many months and is now black.

If the weevil i find is R. palmarum this is also very bad it does the same thing to the palms and is now probaly in southern california you can walk to USA from where i find this palm and weevil. If this is what happen there are now 2 types of weevil for them to worry. R palmarum they find before in south Baja California but never in this part of the peninsula or California USA.

This weevil and cocoons they are to take to USA for tests of the dna and than when they have this information they are to notify the correct persons in our government. I think it is very possible in one cocoon theres pupa it is very heavey but i dont open it.

I am very sorry to say all of this is bad.

Bad news, true.

But, you're trying to do something about it!

Kudos, Cristobal, for your efforts.

Keep looking, keep trying, don't let disaster get worse.

Your efforts matter a great great deal!

Feliz Navidad, y buenos nuevo ano . . . . .

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Ron Vanderhoff

Which is exact location of traps?

There are about 1,500 traps spread through a nine square mile area surrounding the three positive RPW finds in Laguna Beach.

Ron

Thanks Ron,

I was referring to the position of the trap:

- near or far the palm

- how high? or on the ground?

etc.

Thanks to all in advance

Greetings

The traps are not actually positioned on Phoenix palms, but on other unrelated trees, telephone poles, etc. Since these live traps attract adult RPW's, the usual protocol is not to assemble them on or at the base of a Phoenix, since once attracted the weevils may decide they like the palm better.

Because this is a highly urban area with numerous children and pets, the traps are generally placed about 6 to 10 feet above the ground, usually tied with a wire around a tree trunk or pole.

Ron

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Alberto

Today I found this on closer inspection on the afterside of my CIDP:

Some brown young fronds,another older frond leaning on another frond......

What is this...???? Rhinchophorus palmarum...?????:rage::(:(:(:blink:

post-465-040100800 1293050587_thumb.jpg

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Alberto

A younger green frond´´resting´´on a older frond....

post-465-067409100 1293050781_thumb.jpg

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Alberto

Some dead fronds,others are ´´amputed´´

post-465-059274000 1293051470_thumb.jpg

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Alberto

Removed fronds

post-465-023463400 1293051564_thumb.jpg

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