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Moris

chamaedorea radicalis

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Moris

some experience with this beautiful little palm?

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buccaneers37

:D

some experience with this beautiful little palm?

Had two of them planted during last winter, with partial cover. Took 18deg. laughing & asked for more :D

Wayne

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John Case

We generally get to the mid -20's every winter, and sometimes a month or so where the high is only 40 degrees or so. It stopps growing, but no die back that I can see....

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FRITO

no damage in my yard. haridier than microspadix by a few degrees for sure. can take a little more sun than microspadix also. No damage at 18degrees

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Erik

Glad to hear!

I have had one for years in a pot I brought in each year (bought from Cistus). It kept growing even in the house.

This Spring I bought two companions from Phil. Planted all three. They have done great this Summer, taking more Sun than I intended and a lot of heat (several highs of 40 oC). Still flowered repeatedly and keep putting up new spears. Love them.

I plan to make a heated "palm hut" over them for the Winter (zone 7; expected lows to -15 oC). Has anyone done that for these? --Erik

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Erik

Update:

they inadvertently saw lows of 26 oF (-3 oC) a couple of weeks ago. No foliar damage at all, but it did in the flowers.

The heated palm hut will be finished before we get the cold again in a week. --Erik

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edbrown_III

Theres some of this species and microspadix that have sustain 12F in Jax.

Extremely cold tolerant

Best regards

Ed

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_Keith

Mine saw 3 consecutive nights right at 20 degrees. There was no apparent damage, however, this summer it has struggled. Hard to say if there was latent damage, and if the 2 are related, but it never had issues in previous summers.

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Erik

Ed,

good to hear. I really like these.

Palmarati,

interesting. I'll let folks know this summer how mine fare.

Here is a photo from a few minutes ago of their "palm hut" with a thermocube to turn on a 250W brooder lamp and ceramic heater which I hope will keep them warm enough.

--Erikpost-4194-082052800 1290749794_thumb.jpg

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Darkman

Mine saw 3 consecutive nights right at 20 degrees. There was no apparent damage, however, this summer it has struggled. Hard to say if there was latent damage, and if the 2 are related, but it never had issues in previous summers.

Palmarati,

How are they looking so far this winter? Here in Pensacola we have expierienced more hours below 45* than last year but none of the 20 or below temps. I have the microspadix and they are doing well even have new shoots coming up.

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krishnaraoji88

How much frost can these take? For example, will they still sail through winter if planted in an exposed location?

-Krishna

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Darkman

How much frost can these take? For example, will they still sail through winter if planted in an exposed location?

-Krishna

All of mine are under heavy high live oak canopy.

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Julian Hugo

I live in London England and have several radicalis and microspadix which have been outdoors unprotected and have survived to minus 5 degrees Celsius without a problem.

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Collectorpalms

Radicalis is more hardy than Microspadix. Last winter I had 15.5 and the Radicalis were not damaged, the Microspadix defoliated and had some stem dieback. However,, I had one plant that did not come back and it was around 4 feet tall with several trunks. I think the Radicalis can handle frost no problem, but since I am in Texas they are my understory palms since they are more delicate looking. I think they can take more sun ( but not full sun without being acclimated) than Microspadix too without burning.

Ryan

www.collectorpalms.com

Edited by Collectorpalms

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Takil-Explorer

I have seen Chamaedorea microspadix growing wild in the Sierra Gorda, Mexico. They where growing under Tilia. It was in a mixed forest of temperate decidous trees like Tilia, Quercus, Carpinus, Cercis, Liqiudambar and Magnolia dealbata and evergreen trees and Cupressus lusitanica. Also some bromelias on trees and Aporrocactus flageliformis on Tilia and Quercus. That area is very rich in plantspecies!

I have a C. microspadix outside on the balcony here, it never freeses that much here so tender stuff hangs on here during winter.

Alexander

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Sutter Bob

My single specimen with minimal cover looks great after 27 degrees a couple of weeks ago.

I'm definitely planning on trying more of these.

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AggiePalms

Surprisingly, I had a lot of die back last winter, both leaves and stems. I had planted it out in the summer, and it was about 1.3 m in height. It was in a shaded, covered spot next to my concrete entryway, also with Monstera leaf cover. Lowest winter temps in the low 20's (-5C). I didn't think there would be that much damage.

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mnorell

My experience in Natchez last year (3 days continuously below freezing, low 18.4F...plus all the other freezing nights and unusually cold temps for months) was that most of my C. radicalis plants, whether under canopy or out in the open, took some degree of leaf-damage. Generally more damage on exposed specimens as would be expected. A few showed no damage, but that was the exception. All plants came back fine, including one tall trunking specimen under the slight canopy of a Trachycarpus but otherwise exposed to significant wind. One or two plants were completely fried but most just looked a bit ugly until they leafed out in summer. Luckily this species grows pretty fast in the humid Gulf south. They grow beautifully in full, hot sun (in less humid climates I would shade them somewhat). C. microspadix is also sun tolerant but last winter the leaves fried more consistently on that species even in shaded specimens. All grew back beautifully, however. In a normal winter (low of about 23F) neither species takes any damage, exposed or canopied.

An added plus for both of these species is that they reseed/volunteer regularly, so even if there were a devastating freeze, there would be replacements sprouting up the following year. That is comforting!

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Sutter Bob

Update.

Have 6 of these growing outside now, some with minimal cover.

Five easily handled low of 20F in January.

Very tough.

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stevethegator

This is a hardy palm for sure, perhaps the hardiest pinnate palm, especially considering its small size which makes Chameadorea radicalis easy to protect/mulch over.

I had a potted specimen here in Atlanta, GA, which I decided to experiment on (I'm likely moving back to Florida and really didn't want to move it). The goal of this experiemtnt was to find out what will kill it!

Early this month we had around 72 hours below freezing, with an ultimate low of around 5F and highs in the teens. I left the radicalis outside on my covered patio but provided no other protection.

The plant froze solid, pot, soil and all. While still green, it was dead before it even got back above freezing. The killer seemed to be the fozen roots/bud area.

Surprisingly, I have heard stories of in ground specimens in this area surviving the same temps with mulch! I believe I could have kept it alive with some protection.

I hope this data helps, and despite the death of the palm I highly reccomend this species and think it can survive short (overnight) exposure to the single digits F with protection.

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JLeVert

C. radicalis has been in my yard in Augusta, GA so long that it has started naturalizing. It went through 13F - 15F in January and was slightly damaged, but is growing back quickly.

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Albey

No leaf burn after 4 consecutive frosts of: 30.7 / 26.8 / 23.5 / 30.9

Great little Palm.

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TexasColdHardyPalms

1g Seedling as big around as a pencil froze in the pot at 16f. Spear pulled and then miraculously came out and is alive today. Larger potted Microspadix next to it died.

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Palm crazy

There is no doubt in my mind that chamaedorea radicalis is the hardiest feather palm on earth.  20" of snow with low of 19.4F plus two nights at 20F.  No damage thanks to overhead protection. 

DSC_0002.JPG

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Palm crazy
On 2/17/2019 at 3:30 PM, Palm crazy said:

There is no doubt in my mind that chamaedorea radicalis is the hardiest feather palm on earth.  20" of snow with low of 19.4F plus two nights at 20F.  No damage thanks to overhead protection. 

DSC_0002.JPG

I should also add that I did have a blanket over these clumps since they were saying it was going to get down to mid-teens, but only went to 19.4F for one hour. 

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TexasColdHardyPalms

I'm thinking with some simple 3/4" pipe insulation you could keep a tall clump alive well into the single digits.

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Palmensammler

As I have a few seedlings from Dave I'll give it a try here in Germany. Does it grow even at a sunnier place? My plan is to plant it close to the house and this place gets sun from morning till noon.

In really cold winters a protection will be needed

Eckhard

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