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The-ZonePusher

Updates on coconut palms in california?

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Zeeth

I would think 8 years would be the max, as the article about it in palms states 2002 as the year that Alfred first saw it, but I didn't import the seed so I honestly can't say. Either way, it's a superb specimen

Len's plant may have been a 2 year old wild collected seedling in 2002. That's pure conjecture though. I know that it is relatively easy to import seedlings into parts of the US from Madagascar. Seedling import into Australia is next to impossible.

Best regards

Tyrone

I didn't even know importing seedlings was a possibility! That would have been awesome to receive a seedling of this palm before it was even described

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palmcurry

Man I like where this thread has gone. Thanks for sharing a shot of your alfredi Len...inspiring. These palms have an interesting future in SoCal for sure. Jeff's looks bigger of course but he's in hot Florida.

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mnorell

One major point I suspect that dooms Cocos in California is that, since palms do all of their growing at night, they probably need to have a threshold temperature once the sun goes down, no doubt combined with a warm-enough soil temperature, while they commence growing new tissue. Not only in coastal California, but also inland, nighttime temperatures are quite chilly from the perspective of a lowland tropical plant. Even this morning, temperatures across the L.A. basin were in the mid-50s (admittedly lower than normal)...but those low temps extended approximately 90 miles inland to San Bernardino! But beyond that is the phenomenon of the cold eddy that spins over the cold Pacific, and the fact that as the inland deserts heat up, the pressure gradient sucks in that chilly air sometimes rather early in the afternoon, and often, within 10-15 miles of the coast, temperatures by 5-6pm are already cold enough that sweaters are in order, even though the day may have been 80F at 1pm. This give a unique temperature curve compared to climates where cooling happens much later at night.

In terms of absolute low temps, in Miami Beach the average nighttime low temp in the coolest month, January (62.8F), is equal to that measured in the warmest month, August, on the coast in Santa Monica (62.2F). Meanwhile Bermuda, on which coconuts grow plentifully, has daytime temps only a little warmer than coastal and near-coastal California throughout the year, but the nighttime temps are 10F warmer consistently throughout the year.

I would be curious to hear from Tyrone if Perth's evening temperatures from, say, 6pm-midnight (as opposed to morning absolute minima) are as cold as those in Southern California, since the absolute minima appear to be similar (though days appear to be much hotter in summer in Perth). If it's a little warmer there in the evening hours, perhaps that's what allows a coconut to push some growth and survive with less herculean efforts than are required in SoCal?

Ultimately if you want the look of a coconut in Southern California, why not grow a Beccariophoenix or a Howea? Those are both absolutely beautiful palms that carry the relaxed grace of the tropics and grow well, despite the year-round chilly evenings and nights found in California.

You've brought up some interesting points regarding night time temps. I think you're totally right. Perth in summer can sizzle. I'm 18km inland (11 miles) and in the heat of summer we may not get a cooling sea breeze at all on some nights. Also if we do get a seabreeze, it's warmed up by the time it reaches my area after passing over hot land. From mid Dec to mid March the mins happen just before sunrise and are around the 16-19C (61-67F) range on average. However we can get mins as high as 27,28C (81-84F) during a heat wave. The 6pm - midnight temp range will always be above 20C (68F) with midnight temps frequently around 25-27C (77-81F) and sometimes as high as 32C (90F). It's nothing to walk outside at 10pm from an airconditioned house into a wall of real heat in my area. Closer to the coast it's cooler and more humid. Often we'll go down to the beach at night, and it will feel pleasant and cool. By the time we're half way home it's stinking hot and your sweating again at 10pm. I think the high heat in summer between 6pm to midnight is the key. It's also the time when I irrigate and so the humidity goes quite high on those sort of nights. I've never thought about this before, but I think you're right.

Best regards

Tyrone

In Southern California, except in the low desert, it's pretty rare to have temps as you mention in the evening, though it can be warm in the evenings during hot summers in the inland valleys, separated as they are from the coast at least partially by hills or mountains. Certainly not 80-90F at midnight most of the time, though I always lived on the coastal plain so others can comment with greater accuracy for the San Fernando and San Gabriel valleys, and similar areas, as to when the temps really drop into the coolish range on summer nights. I know there are at least some 'hot' nights inland in summer. So I suspect there are obviously some nuanced climate differences between Perth/SW Oz and SoCal, despite the fact that they both fall into that rare "west-coast cool-current maritime fog-desert" climate zone, along with Chile and Portugal. Perhaps these really start to define what makes a Cocos able to survive. It's also interesting that the Newport Beach Cocos, though in a chilly area (even if warmed by automobiles, asphalt, concrete and walls), and the Santa Ana containerized specimen, both have lots of sand at their feet. Many have suggested it in the past, and perhaps this is indeed another key component for cooler areas.

How cold are your ocean temps, and do you also have this 'eddy' of low clouds and fog that sits off the coast, drifting in and out as is typical along the California coast? This is a persistent feature and is either the heaven or the dread of people living in the coastal and near-coastal areas of California in spring and summer. Good sleeping weather, but not that nice if you want to go to the Hollywood Bowl for an evening concert (schlepp the blankets and sweatshirts), and particularly if you're a heat-loving, tropical palm tree! Only when the Pacific Ocean warms up (to about 20-21C) in August-September is there some semblance of evening warmth for people along the coast, since it weakens the eddy and keeps it offshore. Nevertheless, there are some years when even the adamant cloud-forest people along the immediate coast complain that they never saw the sun once from April through September...

I noticed that you say you get six leaves in a summer on your Cocos, Tyrone, and it sounds from the few SoCal specimens mentioned in this thread that it might be only 2-3 leaves on in-ground plants there. A couple of new leaves obviously is not enough to sustain a crown and a healthy plant for years. Six leaves sounds decent enough if old leaves make it more than a season, so perhaps you're just on the edge? Where do Cocos start thriving to the north of you?

Sorry that I missed these questions earlier. I'll try and answer them.

One big difference between the southern west coast of OZ and So Cal is the ocean. Although we are on the west coast of a continent the traditional southerly to northerly flow of waters which keeps temps down is way off shore out near the continental shelf and beyond. The west coast of Oz has a tropical northerly to south current called the Leeuwin current which travels down the west coast all the way down from Indonesia and Papua New Guinea from about the shoreline out to the other cooler south north current way offshore. Winter ocean temps are around 18C and summer temps are between 22-23C, 24C in a warm year. I think the Leeuwin current is strongest in a La Nina period when winds across the top of Australia blow water into the Indian Ocean.

We don't get those clouds in summer like So Cal. It's all blue skies in summer. Sometimes you can literally go weeks without even seeing a small cloud in summer. Summer in Perth is typically blue bright and hot.

With my Cocos (which is suffering this record winter-41 days below 5C) it probably puts out 5 or 6 new leaves in a growing season (Spring to Autumn). In the summer it may very well put out 3 new leaves. I mark the spear year round, and although it grows slowly in winter it doesn't actually stop at all.

Cocos start to thrive at about 29S along the coast (I'm at 32S) at Dongara where there is at least one large healthy trunking specimen growing. Just a little further to the north at Geraldton (28.5S) there are many largish specimens which are fruiting now. Geraldton is approximately 1C warmer than me but with 1/3 of my rainfall. It is still a winter rainfall area that is very hot and dry in summer.

Another thing which is very helpful along the coastal areas of Western Australia is the abundance of sand. Coconuts love the sand.

Best regards

Tyrone

Tyrone--

Thanks for this truly informative rundown. I don't think we'll ever find such a detailed description in any published book, it really illustrates the differences between the two areas and the effect a difference in ocean current can have on the on-land climate. I hope we can all use this to get a real handle on the margins of Cocos cultivation needs.

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palmcurry

Why have a Coco that is languishing in the wrong climate when you can have a vibrant happy palm singing in the right environment?

I give you Howea foresteriana.....looking as every bit tropical as any Cocos nucifera IMO.

hOWEA_F-1.jpg

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palmcurry

This cluster is on the beach too. The ocean is on the other side of that house. Probably planted in the 70's.

hOWEA_F-2.jpg

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DoomsDave

I drove down to Newport last Saturday with Dad and Step-Mom, and we saw the famed Newport Beach Coconut, hooray, hooray, hooray, scream obscenities, and barf out the window . . . .

Still no fruit, though.

I didn't bring my camera. . . . .

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US_Marine

Interesting post. The one in new port doesnt look bad at all. I have a few outside in the ground right now that still look great for now. I know they wont be when the first frost hits. Temps havent been coconut friendly, but still well above freezing. Too bad for the over all cool winters. I protect another coconut palm I have had for a few years now during winter. She seems to be very healthy with six full fronds just this year. If it wasnt for winter lows coconuts wouldnt do that bad here. Does anyone know if there is dry climate they will grow in?

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garrin

John Cressey and Greg Haines wrote an article for the journal 15 or so years ago about multiple Cocos nucifera growing near the Salton Sea, including b&w photos of some (admittedly) ratty-looking coconuts; I'll have to contact them for more information. Incidentally, they have (had?) a Cocos in the ground outside in Alta Dena.

I remember John and Greg's coco photos. They looked a bit ratty from lack of care from a mostly disinterested homeowner. A few years ago I went looking there and saw the palms, which were dead because the area had gone into a major ecnomic deline, the house was abandonded, and water was a distant memory for those poor cocos. But while they were watered they actually looked like they were doing great! Their proximity to the SW shore of the Salton Sea I am sure modified the climate just enough for them to grow well for the time they were watered. Microclimates can be amazing, and with increasing heat island effects of growing cities these can really exceed the norm in an area. I still think it is exciting to read coconut stories from S. Cal. and other marginal areas, even though I have lived among coconuts everywhere in my area for almost 25 years. I have seen fully fruiting tall coconuts here and there in the right juxtaposition to bodies of lake water in central Florida even farther north then Tampa. Whether they are still there these years later I have no idea. If they were recently, I am sure last winter put them through an extreme test. But they certainly did well enough to be very satisfying to grow for a lot of years.

So keep trying if you have the interest and have an unusually favorably microclimate!

Garrin

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JEFF IN MODESTO

Interesting post. The one in new port doesnt look bad at all. I have a few outside in the ground right now that still look great for now. I know they wont be when the first frost hits. Temps havent been coconut friendly, but still well above freezing. Too bad for the over all cool winters. I protect another coconut palm I have had for a few years now during winter. She seems to be very healthy with six full fronds just this year. If it wasnt for winter lows coconuts wouldnt do that bad here. Does anyone know if there is dry climate they will grow in?

For Christs sakes man... Take them insiside ASAP....where the average temps are above 60f.

Trust me on this one, I have many failed experiments with coco's in NorCal ... They cant take soil below 60f for very long. They will be dead soon.

I can and do grow bananas for fruit in Modesto, but Coconuts, just cant take the cold soil.

Jeff

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DoomsDave

Interesting post. The one in new port doesnt look bad at all. I have a few outside in the ground right now that still look great for now. I know they wont be when the first frost hits. Temps havent been coconut friendly, but still well above freezing. Too bad for the over all cool winters. I protect another coconut palm I have had for a few years now during winter. She seems to be very healthy with six full fronds just this year. If it wasnt for winter lows coconuts wouldnt do that bad here. Does anyone know if there is dry climate they will grow in?

Welcome to the forum!

Coconuts will thrive in Saudi Arabia and nearby areas, if they get enough water. They should make it in Palm Springs.

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dalmatiansoap

Great thread. Can anybody help me find a kind of list with palm species best grown in meditterannian climate? I live in same climate here in Croatia on Adriatic coast any we have only few palm species growing free arround here.

:greenthumb:

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mlovecan

Welcome to the forum!

Coconuts will thrive in Saudi Arabia and nearby areas, if they get enough water. They should make it in Palm Springs.

First shot: freshly planted coconut trees on the Arabian Peninsula ( note the trenching for watering ).

Second shot: well established coconuts just down the beach from the first shot.

Regards

Maurice

post-213-035252300 1289649766_thumb.jpg

post-213-089351700 1289649804_thumb.jpg

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mlovecan

A couple more for the coconut lovers ( I am a member of this league ):

post-213-083647300 1289650231_thumb.jpg

post-213-089337300 1289650268_thumb.jpg

post-213-064498000 1289650315_thumb.jpg

post-213-057927900 1289650340_thumb.jpg

post-213-027107900 1289650378_thumb.jpg

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Takil-Explorer

Still coco-loco there in sunny California? I get the idear that you folk are spoild with the array of palms you can grow there! How many species of palms can you grow there, lets say in a Los Angeles like climate? And some very tropical ones like Roystonea.

Where I live only a very few will grow well!

Greetings from the gloomy depressing north...

Alexander

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bubba

Michael and Tyrone, Your back and forth in this section may be the most prescient on this subject that I have ever read. My suggestion:copyright it!

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Jim in Los Altos

Still coco-loco there in sunny California? I get the idear that you folk are spoild with the array of palms you can grow there! How many species of palms can you grow there, lets say in a Los Angeles like climate? And some very tropical ones like Roystonea.

Where I live only a very few will grow well!

Greetings from the gloomy depressing north...

Alexander

Alexander, 1,587,664 palm species are growing in LA County............................ :lol: Seems like it anyway.

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Takil-Explorer

Bloody hell, 1,587,664 species of palms in the LA County.......... Thats more then you see in a lot of tropical cocoloco countries! Lucky folks down there in California!

P.S. If you get a bit of sunshine left sent it to our sundeprived country!

Cheers,

Alexander

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arv

I drove down to Newport last Saturday with Dad and Step-Mom, and we saw the famed Newport Beach Coconut, hooray, hooray, hooray, scream obscenities, and barf out the window . . . .

Still no fruit, though.

I didn't bring my camera. . . . .

Dave, you need to keep a sharp eye on the NB coconut in case it decides to start producing fruit.

Here is something you could use to keep the fruit from getting lost ....

Arv

post-300-034929100 1289858457_thumb.jpg

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MattyB

I believe we can grow about 400 different species here in SoCal.

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Davidl

I would trade the coconuts for some of those palms we can't grow. Unless something changes we are stuck with what we can grow. It never fails a California coconut thread seems to pop up every few months and gets many reply's so I guess it an interesting topic.

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Takil-Explorer

Well 400 species of palms! Still a respectable number I would say. And you do need a very large garden if you want to plant them all...

Alexander

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epicure3

Well 400 species of palms! Still a respectable number I would say. And you do need a very large garden if you want to plant them all...

Alexander

I've got 39 of them. Once I tear down the house, I can plant another 100 varieties. I'll be homeless but that's a secondary consideration.

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Mark M @ S. Oceanside palms

Coco in O'side, 1 km from ocean.

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Ice Blue

I've seen Mark's coconut in Oceanside. I didn't believe it was possible in Socal but it's the real deal. He's got a healthy specimen planted up against a south facing wall.

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aloetom

Interesting post. The one in new port doesnt look bad at all. I have a few outside in the ground right now that still look great for now. I know they wont be when the first frost hits. Temps havent been coconut friendly, but still well above freezing. Too bad for the over all cool winters. I protect another coconut palm I have had for a few years now during winter. She seems to be very healthy with six full fronds just this year. If it wasnt for winter lows coconuts wouldnt do that bad here. Does anyone know if there is dry climate they will grow in?

Welcome to the forum!

Coconuts will thrive in Saudi Arabia and nearby areas, if they get enough water. They should make it in Palm Springs.

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aloetom

Greetings Dave,

I sure enjoy reading a lot of your posts.

Just a quick question, have you been in Saudi ?

I ask because like you California is home, but I spend a lot of time in Saudi.

Be well,

Tom

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Takil-Explorer

And even better if you paint that wall black!

Alexander

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Firepalm

I've seen Mark's coco in Oceanside many times over the last couple years and it still looks amazing. Just saw it a couple weeks ago and it doesn't appear to have been bothered by the previous winter at all. Hope it will continue to thrive for him.

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Bae72

Hi guys, this is a good thread. Lot's of useful info. I've got some coconuts in a greenhouse. I live in a north-eastern suburb of Melbourne, Australia. Not exactly tropical. :)

I had a lot die (7) at the end of winter last year. They were in the greenhouse and doing OK through winter. I read somewhere that they needed alkaline soil so I started applying dolomite lime and watering them because my pH meter said the soil was very acidic. I didn't know you had to plant them in sand. Anyway, turns out the pH meter was wrong and soil wasn't acidic. I think this killed all but one. Reading the thread it seems that it's a poor idea to water coconuts during the colder months. A horticulturalist at Bunnings reckoned I loved them to death. It was a shame, as I'd had them for two years growing slowly. Only one made it, but it's going great now.

I got some more coconuts, some sent down from Cairns and some dwarves through mail-order. They're all going great at the moment. Just wondering what to do when the chill sets in and the greenhouse doesn't heat up as much.

Edited by Bae72

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Tyrone

Hi guys, this is a good thread. Lot's of useful info. I've got some coconuts in a greenhouse. I live in a north-eastern suburb of Melbourne, Australia. Not exactly tropical. :)

I had a lot die (7) at the end of winter last year. They were in the greenhouse and doing OK through winter. I read somewhere that they needed alkaline soil so I started applying dolomite lime and watering them because my pH meter said the soil was very acidic. I didn't know you had to plant them in sand. Anyway, turns out the pH meter was wrong and soil wasn't acidic. I think this killed all but one. Reading the thread it seems that it's a poor idea to water coconuts during the colder months. A horticulturalist at Bunnings reckoned I loved them to death. It was a shame, as I'd had them for two years growing slowly. Only one made it, but it's going great now.

I got some more coconuts, some sent down from Cairns and some dwarves through mail-order. They're all going great at the moment. Just wondering what to do when the chill sets in and the greenhouse doesn't heat up as much.

Wow, you're hard core trying a coconut in Melbourne. :D Well done for trying. When you say greenhouse do you mean a shadecloth covered greenhouse or a hothouse that doesn't let the rain in? Having grown coconuts in a hothouse here in Perth you must put them in the warmest sunniest brightest spot in the hothouse, preferable near something that retains heat to reflect it out at night. Make sure the pot which should be black to absorb heat gets direct sun on it during the day. Also make sure during the growing season you pump your coconut full of steroids (ie don't let it get deficient in anything). I pump my coconut full of Seasol, Powerfeed, Nitrophoska Perfekt, Miracle Gro, and Scotts Micromax for trace elements during the growing season. Come the cold weather in May I stop watering it and as mine is in the ground cover the soil in clear plastic to stop the rain and let the sun in. I have rocks and pebbles all around the ground to absorb the heat and it's all on a raised bed to increase the surface area to the sun and help drain everything away in winter. I also surround it in clear plastic, but it's too tall to cover and has been through two winters uncovered. In your greenhouse you must let it go without water until October at least. It may take some water, but the difference between life and death in winter can probably be measured in millimetres of water. It's that fine. In a hothouse when everythings dry you may get red spider mite attacks as well as ants farming scale and mealy bugs. You must be ready for them if they come. They can move in quickly. For scale and mealy bugs I use Rogor, but be careful with it. It's nasty stuff. Rogor sometimes gets rid of mites, but not always. Keep an eye out for the silvering and webs of spider mites on the undersides of the leaves.

People may call us crazy for trying coconuts, but there are more crazy pointless things to do than grow coconuts away from the tropics. It's good fun. :D Keep it up.

Best regards

Tyrone

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Bae72

Hi guys, this is a good thread. Lot's of useful info. I've got some coconuts in a greenhouse. I live in a north-eastern suburb of Melbourne, Australia. Not exactly tropical. :)

I had a lot die (7) at the end of winter last year. They were in the greenhouse and doing OK through winter. I read somewhere that they needed alkaline soil so I started applying dolomite lime and watering them because my pH meter said the soil was very acidic. I didn't know you had to plant them in sand. Anyway, turns out the pH meter was wrong and soil wasn't acidic. I think this killed all but one. Reading the thread it seems that it's a poor idea to water coconuts during the colder months. A horticulturalist at Bunnings reckoned I loved them to death. It was a shame, as I'd had them for two years growing slowly. Only one made it, but it's going great now.

I got some more coconuts, some sent down from Cairns and some dwarves through mail-order. They're all going great at the moment. Just wondering what to do when the chill sets in and the greenhouse doesn't heat up as much.

Wow, you're hard core trying a coconut in Melbourne. :D Well done for trying. When you say greenhouse do you mean a shadecloth covered greenhouse or a hothouse that doesn't let the rain in? Having grown coconuts in a hothouse here in Perth you must put them in the warmest sunniest brightest spot in the hothouse, preferable near something that retains heat to reflect it out at night. Make sure the pot which should be black to absorb heat gets direct sun on it during the day. Also make sure during the growing season you pump your coconut full of steroids (ie don't let it get deficient in anything). I pump my coconut full of Seasol, Powerfeed, Nitrophoska Perfekt, Miracle Gro, and Scotts Micromax for trace elements during the growing season. Come the cold weather in May I stop watering it and as mine is in the ground cover the soil in clear plastic to stop the rain and let the sun in. I have rocks and pebbles all around the ground to absorb the heat and it's all on a raised bed to increase the surface area to the sun and help drain everything away in winter. I also surround it in clear plastic, but it's too tall to cover and has been through two winters uncovered. In your greenhouse you must let it go without water until October at least. It may take some water, but the difference between life and death in winter can probably be measured in millimetres of water. It's that fine. In a hothouse when everythings dry you may get red spider mite attacks as well as ants farming scale and mealy bugs. You must be ready for them if they come. They can move in quickly. For scale and mealy bugs I use Rogor, but be careful with it. It's nasty stuff. Rogor sometimes gets rid of mites, but not always. Keep an eye out for the silvering and webs of spider mites on the undersides of the leaves.

People may call us crazy for trying coconuts, but there are more crazy pointless things to do than grow coconuts away from the tropics. It's good fun. :D Keep it up.

Best regards

Tyrone

Hi Tyrone. I'm really glad you replied to my post. I've read a few threads here and you seem to know your stuff. Thanks for taking the time to reply to my post.

First off, I didn't point out that my plants are in pots in a greenhouse. Haven't tried to torture them in ground yet.

Here's what I mean by greenhouse:

http://cgi.ebay.com.au/Aluminium-GREENHOUSE-GARDEN-GREEN-GLASSHOUSE-HOT-HOUSE-/300545011578?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_15&hash=item45f9e0ef7a

It cost me about $300 plus $90 for postage, but has been worth it I think. - Worth it because apart from the coconuts it has two Frangipanis in pots that are flowering like crazy, and mangoes that flowered and started to fruit, but then dropped them, plus pineapples, a coco palm and vegies. - I previously had a plastic greenhouse that didn't do much more than block the wind and give the cats a place to laze about on sunny days. That was the one that my dearly departed were in last year. I changed it in August, and I've reviewed my posts on another forum since my first post and my claim that they were OK until spring was wrong. (Memory defect?). They had spots, but seemed to be over it until spring. This link has photos of the now departed:

http://www.nationaltropicals.com.au/component/kunena/coconuts/8-spots-on-coconuts

I didn't know about this forum, so asked the people from whom I bought some now departed dwarf coconuts.

Today the temperature was about 25 but in the greenhouse it was nearly 50 before my wife opened the door to let in some air. I work near the city so can't do that myself. But the thermometer in the greenhouse is a bit tricksy as it reports 50 when it's probably more like 35. I think that's because it is often in direct sunlight. I've tried to caulk as much of the green house as I can (with silicone) to stop heat loss at night. I placed two 40 gallon (220 liter) drums of water in there to both moderate the hot midday temps - believe it or not, the hottest recorded temperature of any Australian capital was in Melbourne two years ago. We like extremes and change apparently. - and soak up heat to radiate it at night, plus many plastic juice containers painted black and full of water to do the same. I want to experiment with heat soaks and such that one day I might be able to create a microclimate to have a coconut outside....(I have bananas outside, and they do well, but I have to protect them from frost)... But I think I need to cover it (greenhouse) on cold nights with a pool cover or similar. I've tried a plastic tarp and it was ineffectual. The problem isn't sunny days so much, but those cloudy, cold winter days I guess.

Anyway, I'll post photos if you think that will enable you to give me advice or at least if you're interested in seeing the plants.

Thanks again. :)

I've edited this post several times now and it's probably more stream of consciousness than logical explanation.

Edited by Bae72

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Tyrone

Had a look at your pictures. The black spots are fungal caused by the cold. Mine gets it in winter. Nothing you can do about it unfortunately.

Your thermometer will give incorrect readings in full sun. You need to shade it to find the real figure. I see your problem when you have those cold cloudy winter days. You may need to pump some heat into the greenhouse on those days. Perth can get days like that, but even the coldest days have some sunlight. When we get winter rainy weather, it will generally come over in waves with sunny periods in between. Those cold persistent cloudy days will be the tough part to overcome for your coconut. Without direct sunlight an unheated greenhouse just gives protection from the wind. Your coconut needs to get to 20C every day to live. A few days at 15C will probably kill it very quickly.

All the best and if you have any more questions please ask.

Best regards

Tyrone

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Bae72

Had a look at your pictures. The black spots are fungal caused by the cold. Mine gets it in winter. Nothing you can do about it unfortunately.

Your thermometer will give incorrect readings in full sun. You need to shade it to find the real figure. I see your problem when you have those cold cloudy winter days. You may need to pump some heat into the greenhouse on those days. Perth can get days like that, but even the coldest days have some sunlight. When we get winter rainy weather, it will generally come over in waves with sunny periods in between. Those cold persistent cloudy days will be the tough part to overcome for your coconut. Without direct sunlight an unheated greenhouse just gives protection from the wind. Your coconut needs to get to 20C every day to live. A few days at 15C will probably kill it very quickly.

All the best and if you have any more questions please ask.

Best regards

Tyrone

Thank you Zappa dude. :)

I can post pictures of the current 'crop' if that'll help. Though I can see how.

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Bae72

Had a look at your pictures. The black spots are fungal caused by the cold. Mine gets it in winter. Nothing you can do about it unfortunately.

Your thermometer will give incorrect readings in full sun. You need to shade it to find the real figure. I see your problem when you have those cold cloudy winter days. You may need to pump some heat into the greenhouse on those days. Perth can get days like that, but even the coldest days have some sunlight. When we get winter rainy weather, it will generally come over in waves with sunny periods in between. Those cold persistent cloudy days will be the tough part to overcome for your coconut. Without direct sunlight an unheated greenhouse just gives protection from the wind. Your coconut needs to get to 20C every day to live. A few days at 15C will probably kill it very quickly.

All the best and if you have any more questions please ask.

Best regards

Tyrone

Regarding pumping heat into greenhouse. I did run an electric heater in the greenhouse when I got the lastest (ebay link) one. With the flimsy one it seemed pointless as the wind could gust under it. I have a thermostat that switches on the heater when it drops below a certain temperature. I'd like to find ways to use the heat from the sun and insulate against heat loss instead of relying on a heater if possible. It would save on energy usage and emissions. Hence my attempts to use passive heating like water.

Thanks again Tyrone.

Edited by Bae72

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garrin

John Cressey and Greg Haines wrote an article for the journal 15 or so years ago about multiple Cocos nucifera growing near the Salton Sea, including b&w photos of some (admittedly) ratty-looking coconuts; I'll have to contact them for more information. Incidentally, they have (had?) a Cocos in the ground outside in Alta Dena.

I saw the Salton Sea coconuts several times after the Haines/Cressey article and they looked great. But the Salton Sea got so polluted by agricultural runoff that the area was mostly abandoned, and what killed those coconuts seems to have been the discontinuation of any watering.

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mushrooms

John Cressey and Greg Haines wrote an article for the journal 15 or so years ago about multiple Cocos nucifera growing near the Salton Sea, including b&w photos of some (admittedly) ratty-looking coconuts; I'll have to contact them for more information. Incidentally, they have (had?) a Cocos in the ground outside in Alta Dena.

I saw the Salton Sea coconuts several times after the Haines/Cressey article and they looked great. But the Salton Sea got so polluted by agricultural runoff that the area was mostly abandoned, and what killed those coconuts seems to have been the discontinuation of any watering.

Really? IIRC, I read an article that said the water just has too much of a high concentration of salt from the agricultural run off.

BTW, do you guys think it would have been able to produce ripe coconuts had it continued to live?

Edited by mushrooms

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_Keith

Did we ever find that one fruiting Coconut in Cali?

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John Case

Interesting post. The one in new port doesnt look bad at all. I have a few outside in the ground right now that still look great for now. I know they wont be when the first frost hits. Temps havent been coconut friendly, but still well above freezing. Too bad for the over all cool winters. I protect another coconut palm I have had for a few years now during winter. She seems to be very healthy with six full fronds just this year. If it wasnt for winter lows coconuts wouldnt do that bad here. Does anyone know if there is dry climate they will grow in?

Once the ground temps go below 50 or so, the cocos will perish, almost certainly.....

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MattyB

Bumps

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Danilopez89

Did we ever find that one fruiting Coconut in Cali?

We did...post-9726-0-45671900-1436328257_thumb.jppost-9726-0-51177400-1436328295_thumb.jp

Then 2 weeks later it gets its head chopped off!

post-9726-0-77073500-1436328383_thumb.jp

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