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Lundkvist Palm Garden

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amazondk

Bo,

Thanks for all the great pictures of your great garden. I hope to make it there some day.

dk

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Mark_NoVA

Wow, it's amazing how many kinds of beatiful palms there are in the world. What can I say--"Magnifik!", I guess. ;)

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bgl

Ari, I'll definitely make sure I'll post updates on the Vrieseas!
Don, well, since we missed you in Brazil back in April I hope you'll able to make it to the Big Island one of these days!
Mark, that's excellent! :)
Bo-Göran

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Morabeza

Magnificent pictures Bo! Thank you for sharing your beauties. :)

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Xenon

Dear Bo,

What type of stone/rock do you use for the walkways and retaining walls?

Thanks,

:) Jonathan

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Mr Rare

Bo:

What an amazing collection of some of the most exotic and beautiful palms on earth. It is nothing short of incredible how fast and well you are growing these palms. I cant believe the growth I see from my last visit and cant wait to see your fabulous garden again soon. You have done an impressive job and your efforts will bequeath the palm world with seeds of the most sought after palms and insure there survival. You are to be commended for creating a very special place.

Jeffry Brusseau

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Urban Rainforest

Bo, Everything is looking awesome as usual !! Can't wait to see it in person again :drool: . C ya in a couple weeks.

Aloha,

Stevo

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bgl

Jacob, thanks for your comments! Glad you enjoyed the photos!

Jeffry, thanks a lot, and you're definitely due for another visit here! It's been a while!

Steve, also, thanks and glad to hear you'll be here soon!

Jonathan, we've only used the native rock, but not for any of the walkways if you're referring to the surface (that's all asphalt). Initially we simply used all the rocks that we had on the property, ranging in size from small rocks to 1 and 2 ton rocks. When we were building our rockwalls, we actually ran out of rocks, so we had to buy. A truckload is usually a couple of hundred Dollars and they get the rock from properties that are being cleared/bulldozed. There are a number of Tongans here and they are very good at building rockwalls. Every now and then we also collect rocks from the ocean, and these rocks have been shaped by the continuous pounding of the waves coming ashore so they are much smoother. Here are four photos showing a bit of everything:

1 - our corner rockwall out by the street. A real good rockwall builder will use primarily larger rocks. Making larger rocks fit together neatly is much more of a challenge than using a whole bunch of small rocks. Normally, real large rocks (there are two in this photo, part of the rockwall) would not be used since they are too heavy to handle, but we had a backhoe on the property when this rockwall was built so we were able to incorporate the two larger ones (found on our property).

2 - Our u-shaped rock planter, built by our Tongan friend Lakina (he also built the rockwall above). The palms in the planter are all Dypsis pilulifera.

3 - Three smoother rocks from the ocean, simply balancing on each other. The larger, lower, rock weighs about 170 lbs.

4 - we found the large rock on the property, and simply moved it (by backhoe) to its present location. It weighs about 1.5 ton. The smaller rocks are all from the ocean.

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bgl

And a few more photos from yesterday and this morning.

The underside of an Astrocaryum mexicanum frond

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bgl

Euterpe precatoria

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bgl

Masoala madagascariensis

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bgl

Actinokentia divaricata. Not easy to get a good photo of since they are so slender and only have 3-4 fronds.

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bgl

Dypsis utilis. Trunk is bifurcating about six ft up.

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bgl

Dypsis madagascariensis. (Bought these two as Dypsis sp. gunther - ID according to Dr. Dransfield).

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bgl

Pritchardia lowreyana

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bgl

Pinanga patula - another Pinanga with a colorful crownshaft!

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bgl

And why not an orchid (Cattleya)! Yes, we do have other plants than palms! :)

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bgl

And a cycad: Zamia skinneri

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bgl

Calyptrocalyx leptostachys - a real cute little palm that opens up with a salmon colored new frond

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bgl

And since we're on cute palms - hard to beat a Licuala cordata!

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bgl

And now two mysteries - first a Dypsis. I bought this as a Dypsis albofarinosa a number of years ago, and apparently it's not. I guess someone is going to tell me it's a D. onilahensis? :lol: BUT, any and all suggestions are welcome! :)

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bgl

Now this one is a real mystery. The seed was collected in Papua New Guinea about 20 years ago (not by me). My guess up until recently was Gronophyllum (now Hydriastele) chaunostachys, but a Palm Society member who visited us recently and who had seen a chaunostchys on Oahu claimed that that's not what it is. So, leaves it wide open for speculation - any ideas?

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bgl

And two more Neoveitchia storckii shots

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bgl

And I'm closing with a shot up the driveway of our house.

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Lowey

BO,

Thanks for the photos, makes me promise myself that I will get to see your garden in person one of these days :D

fantastic palms you have shown us, keep adding more shots when you can please.

Does Pritchardia lowreyana grow ok in full sun? yours looks great in the shade.

Thanks,

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BS Man about Palms

Someday..

Someday I'll get there to witness the "Bo-osity" of it all.......

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bgl

Bruce, my experience is that Pritchardias are very adaptable - they can be grown in shade, partial shade or full sun. But our environment is very unique and the same may not be true elsewhere.

Bill, thanks! So, when can we expect you? :huh:

Bo-Göran

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PatientPalms

Thanks for posting pics of the rock stackings. I still like the one that I knocked over the best. :unsure::huh::lol:

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Xenon

Those Neovetchia storckii are my new desktop background :drool:

:) Jonathan

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GTClover

Intensely gorgeous to say the least! Such an amazing variety.:drool: Has it ever been determine who amongst PalmTalkers has the most species on private property? Bo, your place must be a contender for that spot! And thank you for giving us all their names!

Susan

Edited by GTClover

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bgl

Bill, you're welcome! And hopefully you'll be back soon! :)

Jonathan, glad you liked the Neoveitchia photo. That's one of my favorite palms, and we have two little groves of them, plus they're lining our driveway.

Susan, thank you! We have approx. 625 palm species on our property, but despite that I have never "gone for numbers". There are actually quite a few palm species that are "missing" because I'm just not interested in them. Most of the Chamaedoreas for instance and plenty of Syagrus and Sabal. I'd rather plant a little grove of 10 or so of a palm I really like than adding more species simply for the numbers.

Bo-Göran

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Central Floridave

could that dypsis above be a Dypsis psammophila? again great photos and palms. thanks.

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BS Man about Palms

If I'm lucky I'll know by the end of this year.. or earlier. :)

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chakoro

Bo, I know i am not the first to tell you what an awesome garden you have and i wont be the last.Thanks for taking the time and effort to photograph and post regularly as it is people like you and others that give hope and inspiration to novices like myself. BTW could you please tell me what is the palm on your avatar? Is Kentiopsis piersoniorum a fast grower in Hawaii? Thanks again craig (Chakoro)

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bgl

Dave, I checked Dypsis psammophila in P.O.M. and unfortunately no photo, but based on the description it could certainly be a contender. Thanks for the suggestion! :)

Bill, well, I certainly hope to see you here soon, and in May 2011 if not before!

Craig, thanks a lot for the kind words! The palm in my avatar is a Dypsis pilulifera ("Orange crush"). And I would never call any of the Kentiopsis "fast"! If you look at the one in the photo in post #10 (page 1), that palm was grown from seed that we were given during the IPS Biennial in New Caledonia in October 2000. I brought the seeds back here and had pretty good germination rate, so that particular palm was a tiny seedling in 2001 - nine years ago. Today, overall height about 10 ft/3 m., and as you can see it's beginning to form trunk.

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Pedro 65

:drool:

Ok, Im not into bumps but Im into this one thanks Ron..To be "honest" I had "Years away from Palms" and thanks to Bo, the Lundkvistpalmgarden site " re inspired" me to get back into palms....I visited the site over and over and quickly became 'hooked again" ....I hadnt heard of PTalk till 2 yrs ago.. Pete :)

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bgl

Pete,

Thanks a lot! Knowing that you were inspired by my "old" garden is quite a compliment! :) (And incidentally, I moved out two months after taking the photos in this thread and two months after that I began work on my new garden - still very much a work in progress! :) )

Bo-Göran

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DavidMac

Incredible photos- if you can send me your dark shots I can make them brigher for you. Here is a before and after demonstration with Cyrtostachys renda.

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bgl

David,

Thanks a lot for that generous offer! :) And that is indeed a major difference. I'll have to pass on it this time but will keep it in mind for the future!

Aloha,

Bo-Göran

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