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RyManUtah

"drought" hardy palms

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RyManUtah

hey all,

i just had a thought. i have in the corner of my lot, a cactus garden. it is isolated from the rest of my yard via a 50' wide driveway. as such, there is no sprinkler here (ie, cactus / yuccas). this part of my driveway is devoid of palms. i would like to try one here. which do you think would be the best drought hardy, but still cold hardy? ready to plant, I have the following that CAN be put here, but I'm open to suggestions of which species would be best. it freezes / snows here sometimes though, so nothing very coastal please: i have, Trachys (waggies and forries), needle palms, sabal minors, and sabal palmettos. i'd prefer NOT to use the palmettos, because they are seedlings and i will probably never see it in my lifetime. any thoughts would be great! (warning, i haven't finished weeding lol)post-4496-12771471073957_thumb.jpgpost-4496-12771470940106_thumb.jpgpost-4496-12771471194897_thumb.jpgpost-4496-12771471318409_thumb.jpg

Edited by Ryagra

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RyManUtah

ps, i can go water the palm everyday with no problem... it just doesn't have a sprinkler.

other than the BIG group of cacti, anything here can be transplanted. ideally, i'd like it one the side to the left in picture one, because there is less stuff there... assuming it will "survive" in that space..

Edited by Ryagra

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RyManUtah

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paulgila

hard to tell from the pic but it looks like its pretty much surrounded by hardscape on all sides.i think something with a fairly small "footprint," like a trachy would be best.

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RyManUtah

by "footprint" do you mean roots? haha sorry, i'm not very smart sometimes =]

yes, it is surrounded by concrete, the HUGE weeds are on my neighbors property, which will soon be concrete (they haven't poured their RV driveway in yet)

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Xenon

I thought I saw Washingtonia filfera in another one of your threads, that should be really drought tolerent. Out of the palms you have, I think the Rhapidophyllum hystrix would do best. You could also try a Nannorrhops ritchiana. How about some of the hardier Braheas and Phoenix?

:) Jonathan

Edited by Xenon

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velutina

I visit St. George frequently and have family that lives there. The two palms that always stand out to me are W. filifera and trachys. I'd plant a filifera because it grows faster and I have a feeling it's more drought tolerant.

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paulgila

washies get pretty fat at the base,theres not that much room there. :rolleyes:

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Alberto

Brahea armata , B.clara,B super silver. There silver look fantastic with cactus and other succulents!!

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RyManUtah

ya, i can't put a Washintonia there. The base of the trees in my neighborhood get to like 3ft in a couple years!

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Xenon

How about a Chamaeorops humillis var. "cerifera?"(a triple would look nice), or the blue form of Sereona repens? Sabal uresana has a nice blue tint too. A bluer(I know it's not a word :) Butia capitata.

Jonathan

Edited by Xenon

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Dundo

Brahea edulis or armata would be my choice.

Phoenix Dactyliferas are ideal too.

Edited by Dundo

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RyManUtah

ok, reading everything I'm thinking of going to buy a Trachycarpus wagnerianus, or a blue sereano ripens. Opinions? will they fit her okay? roots? spreading?

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Xerarch

Some good suggestions here, but I would go with either a trachy or Med. fan. Both are small enough to suit the area yet still can get some trunk height. The Serenoa repens will always be quite small and painfully slow growing.

As far a drought tolerance, there is a small Med palm at Lyttle Ranch which is straight west of St. George in the Beaver Dam Wash, I don't know if you have ever been there, The palm is in a small garden with cactus and other desert material, It looks like it gets very little or maybe no supplemental water at all. I've been watching it for probably ten years and it doesn't seem to grow much but it still looks good. Chamaeorops can be a very drought tolerant species once established. I think it could do well in your small area. Anyway, that's my two cents.

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paulgila

its true about med fans.i dug one up & put it in a pot with no soil or water & it continued to live for 6 mos before i got rid of it. seems its not only "drought-tolerant" but "no-soil-tolerant" as well :lol:

the downside with a med fan for this application is that it will clump & get wide at the base.

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Patrick

One thing that I'm wondering is, would you prefer tall and solitary or shorter and bushy? For bushy, there are some real nice Nannorhops out there that stay on the small size, and I like the Trachy idea as well for the small diameter trunk. Have you investigated any of the smaller trunked Braheas? They'd do great in a hot, dry environment, so if you didn't water for a while it would be no big deal.

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RyManUtah

Some good suggestions here, but I would go with either a trachy or Med. fan. Both are small enough to suit the area yet still can get some trunk height. The Serenoa repens will always be quite small and painfully slow growing.

As far a drought tolerance, there is a small Med palm at Lyttle Ranch which is straight west of St. George in the Beaver Dam Wash, I don't know if you have ever been there, The palm is in a small garden with cactus and other desert material, It looks like it gets very little or maybe no supplemental water at all. I've been watching it for probably ten years and it doesn't seem to grow much but it still looks good. Chamaeorops can be a very drought tolerant species once established. I think it could do well in your small area. Anyway, that's my two cents.

i'm going to go check it out =] is it just open to me if i go? or do i need to call or anything? i've been down to the beaver damn wash twice. once to collect joshua tree seeds, and the other to dirt bike. =]

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RyManUtah

One thing that I'm wondering is, would you prefer tall and solitary or shorter and bushy? For bushy, there are some real nice Nannorhops out there that stay on the small size, and I like the Trachy idea as well for the small diameter trunk. Have you investigated any of the smaller trunked Braheas? They'd do great in a hot, dry environment, so if you didn't water for a while it would be no big deal.

I'd like tall and solitary. i have baby trachys on the other side of the driveway, near my lawn, and on the far side of the property in a flower bed. i think maybe the three would compliment each other well, i just didn't know if i could get one to survive in this spot or not...?

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MattyB

Put in a Chamerops humilis 'cerifera' and keep it pruned to one trunk. It'll end up looking like a thin trunked Copernicia cerifera.

post-126-12772350053218_thumb.jpg

post-126-12772350109599_thumb.jpg

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Xerarch

Some good suggestions here, but I would go with either a trachy or Med. fan. Both are small enough to suit the area yet still can get some trunk height. The Serenoa repens will always be quite small and painfully slow growing.

As far a drought tolerance, there is a small Med palm at Lyttle Ranch which is straight west of St. George in the Beaver Dam Wash, I don't know if you have ever been there, The palm is in a small garden with cactus and other desert material, It looks like it gets very little or maybe no supplemental water at all. I've been watching it for probably ten years and it doesn't seem to grow much but it still looks good. Chamaeorops can be a very drought tolerant species once established. I think it could do well in your small area. Anyway, that's my two cents.

i'm going to go check it out =] is it just open to me if i go? or do i need to call or anything? i've been down to the beaver damn wash twice. once to collect joshua tree seeds, and the other to dirt bike. =]

You shouldn't need to call, most people that go there go for bird watching, there aren't a lot of palms, mostly just the one small one. If you are interested in other trees, there are some small orchards where they are growing pomegranites, figs, and persimmons. I think it's a nice day trip but don't expect anything too grand, I just like the beaver dam wash because the mojave desert environment there is so unique when compared to the rest of Utah.

You should be able to find directions on the internet somewhere if you don't know where it is.

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