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Eric in Orlando

cold damage report for palm collection at Leu Gardens

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Eric in Orlando

Here is a report of the cold damage incurred to the palms in the collection at Leu Gardens. Leu Gardens is located in Orlando,FL. Our location falls into USDA zone 9b and is borderlines 10a. We are located on the southeast shore of Lake Rowena which provides for a protected microclimate.

The winter of 2009-2010 was a record setting for the duration of cool and cold weather. December was very warm but it turned cold in early January. The absolute low was only 29F but the duration of cold in January set records. February and March was also much cooler than normal. Many plants did not show much injury for several weeks and slowly started to decline thereafter.

Here are the stats for the cold spell in January. On the night (Jan. 10) it dropped to 29F it was below freezing for an amazing 12 hours. Also the nights of Jan. 10 and 11 had very heavy frost in the open areas. February had no below freezing nights but there were quite a few nights in the mid 30sF to the low 40sF and highs only in the 50sF.

Jan. 1 68/47

Jan. 2 58/39

Jan. 3 47/36

Jan. 4 52/33

Jan. 5 47/35

Jan. 6 50/31

Jan. 7 61/30

Jan. 8 59/38

Jan. 9 41/31

Jan. 10 45/29

32F- 9:30pm

31F- 10:30pm

30F- 1:15am

29F- 5:45am

30F- 9:00am

31F- 9:15am

32F- 9:30am

33F- 9:45am

35F- 10:00am

Jan. 11 53/30

Jan. 12 58/32

Jan. 13 63/36

(plants that were not damaged have no notes following their name)

FAMIILY: Palmae or Arecaceae

SUBFAMILY: Coryphoideae

Tribe: Corypheae

Acoelorrhape wrightii

Brahea armata

Brahea berlandieri

Brahea brandegeei

Brahea clara

Brahea decumbens

Brahea dulcis

Brahea elegans

Brahea nitida

Chamaerops humilis

Chamaerops humils var. argentea

Chelyocarpus chuco- severe burn, recovery uncertain

Chuniophoenix hainanensis

Chuniophoenix nana

Coccothrinax alta

Coccothrinax argentata

Coccothrinax barbadensis- minor burn

Coccothrinax crinita- minor burn

Coccothrinax inaguensis- very minor burn

Coccothrinax miraguama- minor burn

Coccothrinax scoparia- very minor burn

Coccothrinax spissa- moderate burn

Coccothrinax crinita x barbadensis

Coccothrinax sp. (stiff leaf)- moderate burn

Copernicia alba

Copernicia baileyana- minor burn

Copernicia berteroana- moderate burn

Copernicia curbeloi- very minor burn

Copernicia eckmanii- killed

Copernicia fallaensis- minor burn

Copernicia gigas- moderate burn

Copernicia glabrescens var. glabrescens

Copernicia hospita (blue form)- minor burn

Copernicia macroglossa

Copernicia prunifera

Copernicia yarey- very minor burn

Copernicia x sueroana (gigas x rigida)- minor burn

Copernicia x vespertilianum (hospita x rigida)- very minor burn

Corypha utan- defoliated but recovering

Cryosophila albida- minor burn

Cryosophila argentea- very minor burn

Cryosophila stauracantha- very minor burn

Cryosophila warscewiczii- very minor burn

Guihaia argyrata

Guihaia grossefibrosa

Johannesteijsmannia altifrons- killed

Kerriodoxa elegans- moderate to severe damage

Leucothrinax morrisii

Licuala distans- moderate burn

Licuala glabra var. selangorensis- minor burn

Licuala grandis- 1 killed, 1 moderate burn

Licuala lauterbachii- very minor burn

Licuala longipes- very minor burn

Licuala paludosa- minor burn

Licuala parviflora- killed

Licuala peltata var. peltata

Licuala peltata var. sumawongii- very minor burn

Licuala ramsayi

Licuala spinosa- 2 were undamaged, 1 has moderate burn

Livistona australis

Livistona benthamii

Livistona carinensis- moderate burn

Livistona chinensis

Livistona chinensis var. subglobosa

Livistona concinna

Livistona decora (decipiens)

Livistona drudei

Livistona endauensis- moderate burn

Livistona fulva

Livistona jenkinsiana

Livistona lanuginosa

Livistona mariae

Livistona muelleri

Livistona nasmophila

Livistona nitida

Livistona rigida

Livistona robinsoniana- moderate burn

Livistona rotundifolia- severe burn

Livistona rotundifolia var. luzonensis- moderate burn

Livistona saribus (green petiole form)

Livistona saribus (maroon petiole form)

Livistona speciosa

Livistona woodfordii

Livistona australis x chinensis

Nannorhops ritchiana

Pritchardia affinis

Pritchardia beccariana- minor burn

Pritchardia elliptica- minor burn

Pritchardia glabrata- moderate burn

Pritchardia hillebrandii (green form)- 1 has minor burn, 1 has moderate burn

Pritchardia martii

Pritchardia munroi- very minor burn

Pritchardia napaliensis- minor burn

Pritchardia remota

Rhapidophyllum hystrix

Rhapis excelsa

Rhapis excelsa ‘Zuikonishiki’

Rhapis gracilis

Rhapis humilis

Rhapis laosensis

Rhapis multifida

Rhapis subtilis

Sabal bermudana

Sabal blackburniana

Sabal causiarum

Sabal domingensis

Sabal etonia

Sabal guatemalensis

Sabal maritima

Sabal mauritiiformis

Sabal mexicana

Sabal miamiensis

Sabal minor

Sabal minor var. lousiana

Sabal palmetto

Sabal palmetto ‘Lisa’

Sabal parviflora

Sabal princeps

Sabal pumos

Sabal rosei

Sabal uresana

Sabal yapa

Sabal sp. “Bahamas”

Sabal sp. “Birmingham”

Sabal sp. “Neuvo Leon, Mexico”

Sabal sp. “Riverside”

Sabal sp. “Tamaulipus, Mexico”

Sabal sp. “Texensis”

Schippia concolor- very minor burn

Serenoa repens (green form)

Serenoa repens (blue-silver form)

Tahina spectabilis- minor burn

Thrinax excelsa

Thrinax parviflora- minor burn

Thrinax radiata- 1 is undamaged, 1 has moderate burn

Trachycarpus fortunei

Trachycarpus latisectus

Trachycarpus martianus

Trachycarpus takil

Trachycarpus wagnerianus

Trachycarpus sp. “Takaghii”

Trithrinax brasiliensis

Washingtonia filifera

Washingtonia robusta

Zombia antillarum

Zombia antillarum X Coccothrinax argentata

Tribe: Phoeniceae

Phoenix acaulis

Phoenix canariensis

Phoenix canariensis (unknown hybrid parentage)

Phoenix dactylifera ‘Medjool’

Phoenix farinifera

Phoenix loureiroi var. loureiroi

Phoenix loureiroi var. pedunculata

Phoenix paludosa- minor burn

Phoenix pusilla- moderate burn

Phoenix reclinata

Phoenix roebelenii

Phoenix roebelenii (clustering form)

Phoenix roebelenii (Mekong River)

Phoenix rupicola

Phoenix sylvestris

Phoenix sylvestris ‘Robusta’

Phoenix theophrasti

Phoenix sp. “Tunis”

Phoenix reclinata x dactylifera

Phoenix roebelenii x reclinata

Phoenix rupicola x roebelenii- 3 have moderate burn, 1 was severely damaged but recovering, these are growing in an open, exposed location that is one of the coldest in the Garden

Tribe: Borasseae

Bismarckia nobilis (silver-blue form)

Borassodendron machadonis- minor burn

Borassus madagascariensis- minor burn

Hyphaene coriacea (schatan)- moderate damage, new leaves on main trunk are dead

Hyphaene coriacea (turbinata)- moderate damage, new leaves on main trunk are dead

Hyphaene dichotoma

Hyphaene petersiana

Latania loddigesii- minor burn

Latania lontaroides- minor burn

Latania verschaffeltii- defoliated, recovery uncertain

Satranala decussilvae- minor burn

SUBFAMILY: Calamoideae

Tribe: Calameae

Calamus caryotoides

Calamus erectus

Calamus guruba- killed

Calamus latifolius

Calamus leptospadix- very minor burn

Calamus longisetus

Calamus siamensis

Calamus tetradactylus- moderate burn

Calamus usitatus- severe burn

Calamus vestitus- killed

Calamus viminalis

Daemonorops jenkinsiana- minor damage

Daemonorops sabut- killed

Mauritia flexuosa- killed

Maurtiella armata- killed

Oncocalamus tuleyi- killed

Plectocomia elongate- minor burn

Plectocomia himalayana

Plectocomiopsis sp. (Thailand)- minor burn

Raphia farinifera- severe burn

Raphia ruwenzorica- minor burn

Raphia sudanica- severe burn

Salacca magnifica- killed, was still growing weakly from a lightning strike

Salacca wallichiana- minor burn

Salacca zalacca- moderate burn

SUBFAMILY: Ceroxyloideae

Tribe: Cyclospatheae

Pseudophoenix sargentii

Tribe: Ceroxyleae

Ceroxylon parvuum- minor damage

Oraniopsis appendiculata

Ravenea glauca

Ravenea hildebrandtii

Ravenea lakatra

Ravenea madagascariensis

Ravenea rivularis- minor damage

Ravenea robustior- moderate damage

Ravenea sambiranensis- minor damage

Ravenea xerophylla

Tribe: Hyophorbeae

Chamaedorea cataractarum

Chamaedorea elatior

Chamaedorea elegans

Chamaedorea ernesti-augustii

Chamaedorea fragrans

Chamaedorea glaucifolia

Chamaedorea hooperiana

Chamaedorea metallica

Chamaedorea metallica (split leaf form)

Chamaedorea microspadix

Chamaedorea nationsiana

Chamaedorea neurochlamys

Chamaedorea oblongata

Chamaedorea pinnatifrons

Chamaedorea plumosa

Chamaedorea pochutlensis

Chamaedorea radicalis

Chamaedorea schippii

Chamaedorea seifrizii (FTG dwarf)

Chamaedorea stolonifera

Chamaedorea tepejilote- killed

Chamaedorea woodsoniana

Gaussia attenuata- minor burn

Gaussia maya- minor burn

Gaussia princeps- minor burn

Hyophorbe indica (green form)- severely burned, recovering

Hyophorbe indica (red form)- moderate burn

Hyophorbe lagenicaulis- 2 defoliated, recovering

Hyophorbe verschaffeltii- moderate burn

Hyophorbe verschaffeltii x lagenicaulis- moderate burn

Synechanthus fibrosus- minor burn

SUBFAMILY: Nypoideae

Nypa fruticans- 2 were killed

SUBFAMILY: Arecoideae

Tribe: Caryoteae

Arenga australasica- minor burn

Arenga brevipes- defoliated, recovery uncertain

Arenga caudata

Arenga engleri (Okinawa)

Arenga engleri

Arena hastate- killed

Arenga hookeriana (divided leaf form)

Arenga hookeriana (undivided leaf form)- minor burn

Arenga micrantha

Arenga microcarpa- moderate burn

Arenga obtusifolia- minor burn

Arenga pinnata- several had minor to moderate burn

Arenga porphyrocarpa- defoliated, recovery uncertain

Arenga ryukyuensis

Arenga tremula- moderate burn

Arenga undulatifolia- defoliated, recovery uncertain

Arenga westerhoutii- very minor burn

Arenga wightii- very minor burn

Arenga engleri x hookeriana- very minor burn

Caryota basconensis- moderate burn

Caryota cumingii- moderate burn

Caryota gigas

Caryota kiriwongensis

Caryota maxima- defoliated, recovery uncertain

Caryota maxima (philippinensis)- severely burned

Caryota mitis- minor burn

Caryota monostachya

Caryota no- severely burned

Caryota obtusa

Caryota ochlandra

Caryota ophiopellis- severely burned

Caryota rumphiana- severely burned

Caryota urens- very minor burn

Caryota urens (clustering form)- moderate burn

Caryota zebrina- defoliated, recovery uncertain

Caryota mitis x rumphiana- moderate burn

Caryota mitis x urens- moderate burn

Caryota sp. “Elvis”- moderate burn

Caryota sp. “Himalayan”

Caryota sp. “Mystery”

Caryota sp. “Solitaire”

Wallichia caryotoides- minor burn

Wallichia densiflora

Wallichia disticha

Wallichia marianniae

Wallichia siamensis

Tribe: Areceae

Acanthophoenix rubra- killed

Actinokentia divaricata

Actinorhytis calapparia- killed

Adonidia merrillii- killed

Archontophoenix alexandrae

Archontophoenix cunninghamiana

Archontophoenix cunninghamiana “Illawarra”

Archontophoenix maxima

Archontophoenix myolensis

Archontophoenix purpurea- 1 has no damage, 2 have minor to moderate burn

Archontophoenix tuckeri

Archontophoenix sp.

Areca catechu- severely burned but recovering

Areca guppyana- killed

Areca latiloba- killed

Areca triandra- very minor burn

Areca vestiaria- defoliated, recovery uncertain

Areca vestiaria (suckering form)- defoliated, recovery uncertain

Areca vestiaria (maroon form)- killed

Burretiokentia hapala- minor burn

Burretiokentia koghiensis- minor burn

Carpentaria acuminate- minor burn

Carpoxylon macrospermum- 2 have moderate burn

Chambeyronia hookeri

Chambeyronia macrocarpa

Clinostigma exorrhizum- severe burn but recovering

Clinostigma ponapense- killed

Clinostigma samoense- killed

Clinostigma savoryanum

Cyphophoenix elegans

Dictyosperma album

Dictyosperma album var. rubrum- severely damaged

Drymophloeus litigiosus- killed

Dypsis albofarinosa

Dypsis ambositae- minor burn

Dypsis baronii

Dypsis cabadae- minor burn

Dypsis carlsmithii

Dypsis coriacea (“Big Fishtail”)- killed

Dypsis decaryi- 1 severely damaged, 1 has minor burn

Dypsis decipiens

Dypsis faneva- killed

Dypsis lanceolata

Dypsis lastelliana- minor burn

Dypsis leptocheilos- minor burn

Dypsis lutescens- severe burn

Dypsis lutescens ‘Rotundum’- defoliated, recovery uncertain

Dypsis madagascariensis- minor burn

Dypsis madagascariensis “Mahajanga”

Dypsis onilahensis

Dypsis pembana

Dypsis plumosa (“Fineleaf”)- minor burn

Dypsis prestoniana

Dypsis psammophila

Dypsis rivularis- killed

Dypsis robusta

Dypsis sahanofensis- killed

Dypsis saintelucei

Dypsis tokoravina- very minor burn

Dypsis tsaratanensis- minor burn

Dypsis utilis- killed

Dypsis sp. “Betafaka”

Dypsis sp. “Honkona”

Dypsis sp. “Orange Crush”- moderate burn

Dypsis sp. “Pink Crown”- killed

Euterpe edulis

Hedyscepe canterburyana- very minor burn

Heterospathe elata- killed

Howea belmoreana

Howea forsteriana- several with no damage, 1 with minor burn

Hydriastele beguinii- killed

Hydriastele dransfieldii- killed

Hydriastele kasesa- killed

Hydriastele microcarpa- killed

Hydriastele pinangoides- moderate burn

Hyospathe elegans- killed

Iguanura wallichiana - killed

Kentiopsis magnifica

Kentiopsis oliviformis

Laccospadix australasica

Linospadix minor- very minor burn

Linospadix monostachya- very minor burn

Loxococcus rupicola- killed

Nenga pumila var. pachystachya- killed

Nenga pumila var. pumila- killed

Neoveitchia storckii- killed

Normanbya normanbyi- 3 with no damage, 1 with moderate burn

Oenocarpus bataua- killed

Oenocarpus distichus- killed

Orania palindan- defoliated, recovery uncertain

Orania ravaka- killed

Orania sylvicola- killed

Pinanga coronate- moderate burn

Pinanga dicksonii

Pinanga disticha- very minor burn

Pinanga elmeri

Pinanga javanasevere burn

Pinanga kuhlii- severe burn

Pinanga philippinensis

Pinanga speciosa- killed

Prestoea acuminata var. Montana- severe burn

Ptychococcus lepidotus- minor burn

Ptychosperma elegans- severe burn, recovery uncertain

Ptychosperma macarthurii- severe burn

Ptychosperma waitianum- severe burn

Reinhardtia gracilis var. gracilis- very minor burn

Reinhardtia latisecta

Rhopaloblaste augusta- killed

Rhopalostylis baueri

Rhopalostylis cheesemanii

Roscheria melanochaetes- killed

Roystonea borinquena- minor burn

Roystonea elata- 10 specimens with no or very minor burn, 1 with moderate damage

Roystonea oleracea- 2 with minor burn

Roystonea princeps- minor burn

Roystonea regia-1 with no damage, 1 with minor burn, 1 with severe burn but regrowing

Roystonea violacea- minor burn

Satakentia liukiuensis- 1 with minor burn, 1 defoliated but recovering

Veitchia arecina- severe burn but regrowing

Veitchia filifera- severe burn

Veitchia joannis- killed

Wodyetia bifurcate- 5 with no or very minor burn

Wodyetia bifurcata X Veitchia arecina

Tribe: Cocoeae

Acrocomia aculeata

Acrocomia crispa (Gastrococos)- 2 with moderate burn

Acrocomia media- very minor burn

Acrocomia totai

Aiphanes horrid- severe burn

Aiphanes lindeniana- killed

Aiphanes minima- killed

Aiphanes horrida x minima- moderate burn

Aiphanes sp.- severe burn

Allagoptera arenaria

Allagoptera campestris

Allagoptera leucocalyx

Astrocaryum alatum- severe burn, recovery uncertain

Astrocaryum mexicanum- minor burn

Attalea bejinhoensis

Attalea butyracea- minor burn

Attalea cohune- minor burn

Attalea dubia

Attalea phalerata- very minor burn

Attalea rostrata- no cold damge but recovery uncertain still after previous lighting strike

Bactris gasipaes- severely burned, probably killed to roots

Bactris glandulosa var. baileyana- killed

Bactris glaucescens- killed

Bactris mexicana

Bactris setosa

Bactris setulosa- killed

Beccariophoenix alfredii

Beccariophoenix madagascariensis (windows)- minor burn

Beccariophoenix sp. “Split Leaf”

Butia archeri

Butia bonnetii

Butia capitata

Butia capitata var. nehrlingiana

Butia eriospatha

Butia paraguayensis

Butia purpurascens

Butia yatay

Butia eriospatha x microspadix

Cocos nucifera ‘Green Malayan’- severely damaged, recovering so far

Cocos nucifera ‘Maypan’- killed

Cocos nucifera ‘Panama Tall’- severely damaged, recovering so far

Desmoncus orthacanthos- moderate burn

Elaeis guineensis- severe burn

Elaeis oleifera- severe burn

Jubaeopsis caffra- very minor burn

Lytocaryum hoehnei

Lytocaryum weddellianum

Marojejya darianii- killed

Marojejya insignis- killed

Masoala kona- killed

Masoala madagascariensis- minor burn

Parajubaea sunkha

Parajubaea torallyi var. microcarpa

Polyandrococos caudescens- minor burn

Syagrus amara- moderate burn

Syagrus botryophora- 2 with minor damage, 1 with moderate burn

Syagrus coronate- minor burn

Syagrus glaucescens

Syagrus oleraceae- minor burn

Syagrus orinocensis- minor burn

Syagrus picrophylla- minor burn

Syagrus pseudococos- minor burn

Syagrus romanzoffianum

Syagrus romanzoffianum ‘Littoralis’

Syagrus ruschiana- moderate burn

Syagrus sancona- minor burn

Syagrus schizophylla- 1 with minor burn, 3 with no damage

Syagus stenopetalata- minor burn

Syagrus vermicularis- killed

Syagrus sp.- moderate burn

Syagrus sp. (suckering)- minor burn

Syagrus x costae (coronata x oleraceae)- moderate burn

Syagrus x montgomeriana (schizophylla x romanzoffianum)- minor burn

Voanioala gerardii- severe burn

X Butiagrus nabonnandii (Butia capitata X Syagrus romanzoffianum)

X Jubutiagus everettii (Jubaea chilensis X Butia capitata X Syagrus romanzoffianum)

Butia capitata X Jubaea chilensis

Butia capitata X Parajubaea coccoides

Tribe: Geonomeae

Calyptrocalyx elegans var. boalak- killed

Calyptrocalyx forbesii- killed

Calyptrocalyx hollrungii- killed

Calyptrocalyx julianettii- killed

Calyptrocalyx leptostachys- killed

Calyptrocalyx micholitzii- killed

Calyptrocalyx pachystachys- killed

Calyptrocalyx polyphyllus- killed

Calyptrocalyx yamutumene- killed

Calyptronoma rivalis- killed

Geonoma gamiova- very minor burn

Geonoma interrupta- killed

Geonoma pohliana- very minor burn

Geonoma schottiana- very minor burn

Pholidostachys pulchra- killed

Welfia regia- killed

SUBFAMILY; Phytelephantoideae

Phytelephas macrocarpa- killed

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tropicbreeze

Looks like Calyptrocalyx didn't stand a chance.

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Eric in Orlando

Not even C. polyphyllus which is supposed to be one of the hardier ones. I think it was just the long relentless cool/cold that killed them.

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redant

Excellent info, I'm going to keep this info for any future shopping, I'm done with zone pushing and would prefer a less diverse but more stable garden.

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gsn

Eric,

Thanks for the cold damage report..

Leu Gardens has to be one of the best microclimates in central Florida ,at least inland. As some of the close surburban areas of Orlando got down to around 25F,26F according to reports, and from what I researched on weatherunderground.

To have only gotten down to a low of 29F is amazing,I got lower than that last year (2008-2009) over here in Titusville 28F, this years (2010) low was 24.4F!

I only have a few palms that weren't damaged,some were killed out right and most severly damaged. I won't list them all only to say the usual old standbys (queens,butias,mules,phoenix,chamerops,sabals,serenoas) are the only ones that came through unscathed. Any crown shafted palm I had was either killed ,completely defoliated,or at least 75 percent damaged!

Two back to back freezes here have driven the point home for me,that at least here in my climate in east central Florida that zone pushing is like beating your head against a brick wall, my head loses...

I'm with redant I will keep planting palms,but I will be planting withan eye toward more cold hardy palms.No there won't be as many diverse species in my garden,but at least hopefully they will all be green and growing come April ,rather than brown, I like green better even if common!

I'll leave it to the botanical gardens like Leu to test the limits,and come see them at the fantastic tropical oasis ya'll have created there! :)

Edited by gsn

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paulgila

eric did you type ALL that? mustve taken a loooooong time... :mrlooney:

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sarasota alex

Eric, thanks for the info! I have a couple of questions. I remember seeing pictures of Jubaea chilensis at Leu. Is it still there? I didn't find it on the list. Also, was Tahina protected in any way, or it just naturally was able to handle the sub-freezing temps at such a young age?

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PalmatierMeg

Thanks for the detailed info, Eric. Leu's temperatures mirror mine closely. The palms I have/had in common with it show similar outcomes. My ultimate low was 28.5 the morning of Jan. 11. I can see that none of my Calyptrocalyx should be planted - unless I'm prepared to take drastic means to protect them.

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Trópico

Thanks Eric! I would suppose most were under oak canopy. This deserves to be in the cold damage section.

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BeerPlant

Frantasic and invaluable info Eric! Especially for us on the edge of central fl who are in cold pockets. If palms recieve severe damage at Leu then we might as well not waste our time unless under extreme protection!

Thanks Again!

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tikitiki

I have some of the same results and some different. My Kerriodoxa elegans look perfect no problem at all. While some of yours that have no notes were killed out right in my yard.

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edric

Ditto! Thanks for the up-date, Ed

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Tyrone

Amazed at the Tahina. :)

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peachy

Thanks Eric, altho on the other side of the planet, these stats are very handy for me as I live in a similar climatic zone. Strange how some palms that survive a minus 5c frost unscathed here, died in the Leu gardens and palms that died here survived there. Still I intend to copy and keep your list of unscathed palms for my shopping list.

Peachy

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Alberto

Thanks Eric!

I saw the B.eriospatha x B.microspadix were untouched...Not a surprise! What is the size of the little hybrid now?

What surprised me was the same kind of burning (little damage) to Dypsis plumosa and D.ambositrae. i was expecting to the real ambositrae to be hardier then the ´´fake or fine leaf´´ or more properly B..plumosa!!:blink:

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Eric in Orlando

eric did you type ALL that? mustve taken a loooooong time... :mrlooney:

I already have the master list saved as a Word document. Just printed the list, went out and made notes, and typed in the damage results.

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Eric in Orlando

Eric, thanks for the info! I have a couple of questions. I remember seeing pictures of Jubaea chilensis at Leu. Is it still there? I didn't find it on the list. Also, was Tahina protected in any way, or it just naturally was able to handle the sub-freezing temps at such a young age?

No, that old Jubaea died back in 2002, it got a bud rot and died during the summer. It had about 6ft of clear trunk.

The Tahina was not protected at all and is growing in a fairly open location so probably had some frost on it too. Its only about a foot tall.

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Eric in Orlando

Thanks for the detailed info, Eric. Leu's temperatures mirror mine closely. The palms I have/had in common with it show similar outcomes. My ultimate low was 28.5 the morning of Jan. 11. I can see that none of my Calyptrocalyx should be planted - unless I'm prepared to take drastic means to protect them.

I think most of the Calyptrocalyx would have been fine if it had been a "normal" freeze (if there is such a thing). One or 2 nights in the upper 20sF but then warmed back up. I believe it was just the sheer duration that wiped them out, especially C. polyphyllus. I had one years ago in a container that I left out and it was 29-30F a couple nights and it wasn't bothered. I have a few extras that I will be planting back out in the next month. They were all growing in a very protected location under tree canopy.

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Eric in Orlando

Thanks Eric!

I saw the B.eriospatha x B.microspadix were untouched...Not a surprise! What is the size of the little hybrid now?

What surprised me was the same kind of burning (little damage) to Dypsis plumosa and D.ambositrae. i was expecting to the real ambositrae to be hardier then the ´´fake or fine leaf´´ or more properly B..plumosa!!:blink:

The hybrid is about 2ft tall now.

Those 2 Dypsis are planted very near each other. Size might have something to do with it. The D. ambositrae is small, about 1-2ft tall while the D. plumosa is 7ft.

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Eric in Orlando

Glad everyone found the info useful !!!

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sarasota alex

Eric, I noticed Myrialepis paradoxa on the list of palms you had donated to the CFPACS auction this weekend. Could you advise on your experience with this palm's cold-hardiness for Central Florida? It's not on your list above. Thanks!

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Eric in Orlando

I'm not sure, I just planted one this summer so it is going through it's first winter. It comes from strictly tropical habitat but some other rattans like that have been semi hardy. This one looks to be a giant !

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