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Wilyum

South Louisiana Queen Palms

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Wilyum

I have a concern and question. Here in South Louisiana, a few weeks back we got into the TEEN temperatures. Mine along with most of other peoples queen palms in their yards all seem to be brown and barely green. What is the best solution to getting these back healty and green again? Will this take years?

I have about 8 of these planted behind a fence for my pool viewing area and its going to look horrible this summer. Any ideas how to spruce this up for the summer time? Anything special I can do? I have about $2,000 invested in these trees.

Any information can help.

Thanks

William

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TikiRick

William,

The only real thing that can help is time. I know that doesn't sound all that great...but time will tell whether or not a green spear emerges. It may take months for true cold damage to show. If they can be reached, the crown should be drenched in copper fungicide. If not, then there's not really anything to do. Just don't do anything premature like chopping them down too soon. As long as there is not another cold blast (freezing temps for hours)you may just be in luck.

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gsytch

William- Queens will respond quickly. Last years' freeze up north of me in rural areas burnt them but good. They looked fine come summer. If they are alive, they will come back quickly once the weather does. I wouldn't feed until I see new growth and warmer temps! Greg

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Rafael

I have a concern and question. Here in South Louisiana, a few weeks back we got into the TEEN temperatures. Mine along with most of other peoples queen palms in their yards all seem to be brown and barely green. What is the best solution to getting these back healty and green again? Will this take years?

I have about 8 of these planted behind a fence for my pool viewing area and its going to look horrible this summer. Any ideas how to spruce this up for the summer time? Anything special I can do? I have about $2,000 invested in these trees.

Any information can help.

Thanks

William

Can you upload some good pics of it?

And how low did temps raise overthere?

I have 7 of those palms, all big sized!

Wish you luck!

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Gallop

You're Queens should pull through just fine,there pretty good about @ coming back. Mine were completely defoliated and spears pulled on 4 of mine the last two winters in a row and have come back. In spring I fertilize and water, nothing special just be patient by the end of summer they will have recovered. I've never lost one in Pensacola fl,our temps are pretty much the same as you re's. You might want to consider trying BXS they are tough as nails, prettier I think and readily available. The also grow fast once in the ground. Beats having to worry about the queens each winter.

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NBTX11

Every queen around here defoliated as well. I'll be interested to see how many of them survive, once the heat returns. The only thing that will really help is time. Queens recover well from low 20sF and spear pulls. Seen it first hand on mine. The first spear will come up deformed once it resumes growth in Mar or Apr, then each one after should be healthy. That is, if you were able to keep it alive. I saw mid teens here, but I think it is still alive, although completely brown. There appears to be some life to the spear. It got so cold my CIDP and Robustas defoliated, except for the central spears which are green. Do not give up on them and wait for the spear to start moving again in the spring.

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Alicehunter2000

They may appear dead ...... but don't give up on them until the end of summer (if no new growth). They sound like larger palms, so that will help. What doesn't die will be stronger during the next freeze. I have a few queens that had spear pulls last year, that barely had leaf burn this year :blink: and this has been a much, much worse winter....go figure? All I can attribute it too is that these really harden off after being exposed to low temps. Hopefully the future will be bright for your palms as well........that being said, teens are pretty darn low temps., even for a queen. Good luck, and Welcome to Palmtalk.

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Kathryn

Hey William - Welcome to PalmTalk!

With the prolonged cold temperatures you experienced reaching into the teens, the future doesn't look so bright for your Queen (Syagrus romanzoffiana) palms. Most get damage in the low 20’s and many don’t survive 18ºF with the prolonged cold we had - multiple nights below freezing without warming up much during the day. All this rain we’ve had with continued cold won’t help with root rot.

Check out the Syagrus romanzoffiana thread in this cold damage forum for a little more information.

That said, only time will tell if your palms will survive. Carefully remove the brown foliage and the emerging spear (if it can be removed with a slight tug). Pour some hydrogen peroxide on the area of the emerging spear to help with fungus and rot.

If it recovers, at least the first several new leaves will be deformed but eventually they next ones will look normal. I shouldn’t take long to look good again - maybe by the end of the summer.

The Louisiana palm society is having a meeting at my house March 14. I will give a tour of my yard and discuss the brown and green plants, giving their history and projected life. Check out the Affiliate forum for the meeting information.

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_Keith

I have a concern and question. Here in South Louisiana, a few weeks back we got into the TEEN temperatures. Mine along with most of other peoples queen palms in their yards all seem to be brown and barely green. What is the best solution to getting these back healty and green again? Will this take years?

I have about 8 of these planted behind a fence for my pool viewing area and its going to look horrible this summer. Any ideas how to spruce this up for the summer time? Anything special I can do? I have about $2,000 invested in these trees.

Any information can help.

Thanks

William

If you are in New Iberia, then I am right down the street from you. We were borderline here on the queens. Many look dead, but I suspect most will return and fast, but likely not return to their former glory till the end of the summer. Shoot me a PM and let me know where you are.

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Wilyum

I have a concern and question. Here in South Louisiana, a few weeks back we got into the TEEN temperatures. Mine along with most of other peoples queen palms in their yards all seem to be brown and barely green. What is the best solution to getting these back healty and green again? Will this take years?

I have about 8 of these planted behind a fence for my pool viewing area and its going to look horrible this summer. Any ideas how to spruce this up for the summer time? Anything special I can do? I have about $2,000 invested in these trees.

Any information can help.

Thanks

William

If you are in New Iberia, then I am right down the street from you. We were borderline here on the queens. Many look dead, but I suspect most will return and fast, but likely not return to their former glory till the end of the summer. Shoot me a PM and let me know where you are.

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Xenon

Queens look blowtorched in Houston, with more minimal damage closer to the Gulf. Queens within a mile of the Gulf have no damage.

-Jonathan

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sfooz

You're Queens should pull through just fine,there pretty good about @ coming back. Mine were completely defoliated and spears pulled on 4 of mine the last two winters in a row and have come back. In spring I fertilize and water, nothing special just be patient by the end of summer they will have recovered. I've never lost one in Pensacola fl,our temps are pretty much the same as you re's. You might want to consider trying BXS they are tough as nails, prettier I think and readily available. The also grow fast once in the ground. Beats having to worry about the queens each winter.

what is a bxs???

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PalmatierMeg

bxs = Butia crossed with Syagrus, also called the mule palm. Most common mules are Butia capitata x Syagrus romanzoffiana. Mule palms are usually sterile but are much coldhardier than queen palms. They vary in appearance but usually have a "tropical" look that belies their hardiness. A mule palm should do well in your area.

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JASON M

Queens look blowtorched in Houston, with more minimal damage closer to the Gulf. Queens within a mile of the Gulf have no damage.

-Jonathan

I was there about 2 weeks ago, and they were very bad. Down near the gulf, very low damage. Over to the East and in Louisiana, they look like they were painted orange.

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Collectorpalms

As far as Houston- Only remaing Zone 9 (stayed above 20) for the Houston area was inside the 610 loop extending about to: halfway to beltway 8 in the built up areas, and along the coast. The only areas I saw that stayed above 25, zone 9b was near Riveroaks, random spots up againts large buildings, and areas of Galveston and those were bordline 25 to 27. Those are the only places I assume that any really tropical palms like Royals, Foxtails etc.. might look okay and queens untouched. Landscapers have been quick to replace some of the plants in the last month, so it will be hard to tell soon where the death and destruction was at it worst since it was areas that had squeaked by with zone 9/10 plants for a long time( which was btween bw 8 and 1960 loop, and Katy and other burbs in my opinion that was near 17F).

Edited by Collectorpalms

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Collectorpalms

oops...

Edited by Collectorpalms

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NBTX11

In march I took a trip from San Antonio to Pensacola FL. The ONLY place I saw queen palms that were not completely defoliated was in Houston. I saw a few in Houston that were only about 50% burned. I actually saw a very large one in Katy, when stopping at a gas station, that looked quite good relatively speaking. Only about 50% burned as I said.

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Collectorpalms

In the town of Katy? Or along interstate 10 and katy freeway and its something like 12 to 18 lanes of traffic? I wonder if the circulation of traffic is enough to add a degree or two from the low on calm nights. In front of my House 1 lane, I can feel the wind from the Aggie buses.

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NBTX11

In the town of Katy? Or along interstate 10 and katy freeway and its something like 12 to 18 lanes of traffic? I wonder if the circulation of traffic is enough to add a degree or two from the low on calm nights. In front of my House 1 lane, I can feel the wind from the Aggie buses.

Well, actually right off I-10 at one of the Katy exits, about 100 yards from the freeway at most.

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Ed in Houston

I live in SE Houston ( Clear Lake area) between I-45 and Galveston Bay. The coldest night here was 22 degrees with mid 20's on either side. My queen had about 50% damage, about typical for the area but is growing nicely now. The commonly planted palm in the area that got the worst of it were the pygmy dates. It is still too early to tell for sure but I would estimate that only about 30% survived locally that were unprotected . From street observations, it looks like the chance of survival went up sharply with pygmy's that had a 6 foot or taller trunk. My newly planted 6 foot king and foxtail made it with protection (heat lamp and sheet covering). I thought for sure that my newly planted majesty had died, but it has some new growth after pushing out a very badly damaged and rotten spear. One nice surprise was no damage at all to a 25 foot grapefruit tree that was well hardened off from early season cold that hit Houston.

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Collectorpalms

Clear Lake would be a nice microclimate to live for Palms. It is sandwiched between Houston and Galveston Bay and is moderated, by Houston and the Bay. There is about 5 to 7 degree difference east of 45 south of Houston compared to west of 45. Webster which is on I45 had 17 or 18 degrees according to a nursery owner. That is only 3 to 5 miles from Clear Lake itself.

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Xenon

In march I took a trip from San Antonio to Pensacola FL. The ONLY place I saw queen palms that were not completely defoliated was in Houston. I saw a few in Houston that were only about 50% burned. I actually saw a very large one in Katy, when stopping at a gas station, that looked quite good relatively speaking. Only about 50% burned as I said.

Hmmm...in my suburb in Katy all the queens look 100% defoiliated..L.chinesis 70% burn. Mostly pure robustas have 70% burn while intermediate forms have about 50% burn. CIDPs took about 60% burn.

-Jonathan

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Xenon

Oh, R.rivulris and P.roebilleni are DEAD.

-Jonathan

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NBTX11

In march I took a trip from San Antonio to Pensacola FL. The ONLY place I saw queen palms that were not completely defoliated was in Houston. I saw a few in Houston that were only about 50% burned. I actually saw a very large one in Katy, when stopping at a gas station, that looked quite good relatively speaking. Only about 50% burned as I said.

Hmmm...in my suburb in Katy all the queens look 100% defoiliated..L.chinesis 70% burn. Mostly pure robustas have 70% burn while intermediate forms have about 50% burn. CIDPs took about 60% burn.

-Jonathan

Well, I should say most defoliated, but I did see some survivors with a moderate amount of green left.

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Mr. Coconut Palm

All the queens I have seen in the Bryan/College Station area of Texas are totally dead, with the exception of the ones that collectorpalms has. The ones he has close to his house survived, but I think he lost some further from the house. Some of his are silver queens, so that explains them making it when regular queens are toast after this past winter. I planted a small $10 queen in my sister in law's front yard in Bryan last summer, that I am afraid is dead, even though I tried to protect it on the coldest nights last winter. I will give it to June or July just in case before I dig it up. When I was in Galveston a couple of weeks ago, everything looked pretty good. Most of the damage there was still from Hurrican Ike, rather than freeze damage. There are a couple of royals along the south side of two buildings at Moody Gardens that were alive, but not as healthy as they usually look in Brownsville or South Florida.

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NBTX11

I've started to notice some now pushing green spears recently around town. Which means they survived at least 16 unprotected.

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Mr. Coconut Palm

I've started to notice some now pushing green spears recently around town. Which means they survived at least 16 unprotected.

They must be silver queens, which are supposedly hardy to the upper teens, as opposed to the regular queens, which are only hardy to about 24. Unfortunately, I don't think the average nursery that sells palms knows the difference between the two. For that matter, I have studied palms since I was a boy, and I couldn't tell you the difference just by looking at them. The only way I can tell is if the queens survive a bad winter unprotected, then chances are they are silver queens.

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Mr. Coconut Palm

I've started to notice some now pushing green spears recently around town. Which means they survived at least 16 unprotected.

Also any of them that are near the Comal River would probably not have experienced anything below 20F where they are growing, since the Comal is spring fed and stays 72-74F year round. I would suspicion a yard on the south side of the Comal would probably be Zone 9B, especially near the bank of the river.

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Xenon

:)

Oh, R.rivulris and P.roebilleni are DEAD.

-Jonathan

I saw a roebilleni today with 5 ft. of trunk, pushing out a spear!

:) Jonathan

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gsn

All the queens I have seen in the Bryan/College Station area of Texas are totally dead, with the exception of the ones that collectorpalms has. The ones he has close to his house survived, but I think he lost some further from the house. Some of his are silver queens, so that explains them making it when regular queens are toast after this past winter.

They must be silver queens, which are supposedly hardy to the upper teens, as opposed to the regular queens, which are only hardy to about 24. Unfortunately, I don't think the average nursery that sells palms knows the difference between the two. For that matter, I have studied palms since I was a boy, and I couldn't tell you the difference just by looking at them. The only way I can tell is if the queens survive a bad winter unprotected, then chances are they are silver queens.

What are these mythical Syagrus litoralis(silver queen)palms you speak of?

Litoralis means close to the SHORE,so I would think that a palm of that name would be less cold hardy?

Me thinks that silver queen was an inventive nursey name to sell palms, because I defy someone to identify a silver queen by the appearance of the palm. There is considerable variation in characteristics and looks of queen palms.

Having said that I am fairly certain that some queen palms from certain providences might be more cold hardy than others! :winkie:

Hopefully some will recover, it was a bad winter to say the least! :)

Edited by gsn
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NBTX11

I've started to notice some now pushing green spears recently around town. Which means they survived at least 16 unprotected.

They must be silver queens, which are supposedly hardy to the upper teens, as opposed to the regular queens, which are only hardy to about 24. Unfortunately, I don't think the average nursery that sells palms knows the difference between the two. For that matter, I have studied palms since I was a boy, and I couldn't tell you the difference just by looking at them. The only way I can tell is if the queens survive a bad winter unprotected, then chances are they are silver queens.

Regular queens are hardier than 24F. A few yrs ago, we got down in the lower 20s (somewhere between 21 and 23, depending on where), and EVERY single queen of any size survived, many unburned.

As I stated, I have started to notice several large ones pushing new spears, and can see green poking out. Many are dead, but there will be some survivors. As far as the rivers, you may be correct, there are obviously areas around that are warmer than the airport low. The New Braunfels airport low was actually a ridiculously cold 14 (as opposed to SA's 16), but you have to understand, the NB airport is way out in nowhere, in the middle of a field, 5-10 miles NW of town. Far away from the I-35 heat island. Areas close to I-35 stayed in the 15-18F range, imo.

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NBTX11

I guess those of us in marginal areas need to get our hands on this Syagrus Litoralis, Silver Queen.

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Collectorpalms

I think this is a great place discuss palms. Ever notice that everyone thinks they are always right regardless?? I do not believe anyone except what I can see for my own eyes. So say what you want, believe what you want, be sarcastic all you want, blah blah blah. Happy gardening! Oh by the way, here are some "Syagrus Var Mythical" Palm pictures from yesterday.

mythicalqueens.JPG

mythicalqueenstrunks.JPG

Edited by Collectorpalms

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Collectorpalms

I wonder what these are? I just call em "Syagrus Var Box Store" mrlooney.gif from yesterday too.

syagrusboxstore.JPG

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Collectorpalms

Recovering, but earlier Defoliated Washingtonia to the lower left for temperature reference.

mythicalqueenandmex.JPG

Edited by Collectorpalms

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gsn

I think this is a great place discuss palms. Ever notice that everyone thinks they are always right regardless?? I do not believe anyone except what I can see for my own eyes. So say what you want, believe what you want, be sarcastic all you want, blah blah blah. Happy gardening! Oh by the way, here are some "Syagrus Var Mythical" Palm pictures from yesterday.

mythicalqueens.JPG

I also think it is a great place to disscuss palms. Right or wrong this is my opinion based on previous discussions here on this board and with other people!

What keys/charcteristics are you using to determine that the palms pictured above are in fact a "Sygrus litoralis"(silver queen)?

And possibily not queen palms from seed of the Santa Catarina region,or some other provenance where queen palms grow?

I wasn't aware that at the seedling stage of the palms pictured (fairly mature) that Silver Queen("Sygrus litoralis") was a described species,which to my knowledge it still is not, or even a real named variation, or even that the name silver queen was on the palm radar at that time the palms pictured were seedlings?

As stated this subject has been disscused in depth with many opinions on the forum previously,and the jury IMHO is still far from a decision/consenus that in fact the so called Silver Queen is the most cold hardy queen form, even if at some future point it is determined to be a distinct species/named variation?

I'm glad you had some queens that survived your low temps! :)

Edited by gsn

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gsn

Wilyum,

Any update on your queens?

Hopefully you had some survivors? :)

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Wilyum

I have been in Chicago over the last few weeks for work. I hope out when I get home this weekend. I will try to snap some photos and post for you guys to comment on..on how to continue.

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Darkman

Originally I thought some of my smaller queens may have survived as they showed no burning BUT today I saw that the three foot green spear was turning brown. I grabbed it and it came out with a rotton base. This probably means that my queens, all four of them are probbaly dead. These came from two different sources and at least one of them was supposed to be a coastal queen. All of them have had the benefits of a dedicated irrigation system with bubblers, three doses of Palm fertilizer last spring and summer, an initial treatment of Super Thrive and a dose of epsom salts. All seemed to be in great shape until the winter of '10. I have replaced two of them but I am waiting to do my large one to see if it can pull off a miracle. It has about 16' of clear trunk so maybe it can. I was looking at the pics from Houston area and observed that his leaf scars are much closer together than mine. I have not defoiliated my large Queen so I may try to post a pic so it can be compared.

In an earlier post I spoke of the uncertainty of my Phoenix Reclinata. Well I think I can say that it has made it. It has many of the pups growing ugly but growing and the main trunk has about 18" of growth. Also my slender lady palm has shown no ill effects and is doing well. My Sylvestris is fine. Sadly it appears that my triple trunk Roebelini has lost the two smaller trunks. This was a large speciman plant and it will never be the same without the other two. The two trunks that died were 4' and 5'. The survivor was a little over 6'. The base caliper on the smallest was at least 5". These were tented and had a 100w light bulb in the tent for heat. Obviously this wasn't enough.

Where does one buy a BXS cross in the NW Florida area that would have at least 8" of clear trunk? Would I have to get a second mortgage for one?

Last thoughts. The big orange box store had some Queens that were easily twenty foot tall with about 8' of clear trunk that they were selling for $95. They had twelve foot ones that were $59. At that price I can replace them every year just wouldn't want to. The big ones easily were over 400 pounds. I noticed that the leaves were a darker green and were fuller than my originals. Any thoughts on this.

Oh overall low at my house was 19.3 on two different days.

Charles in Pensacola FL

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_Keith

Although spear pull is a bad sign, it is not a certain death sentence. This isn't the optimum palm planting time down here quite yet, so I say give them another month.

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