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sur4z

South Florida cold damage January 20010

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sur4z

From January 2nd to January 12th South Florida experience the longest period of nights in the 30's and 40's since the 1940s. I live about 300 yards from the Atlantic (I can't see it) so it never got below freezing but my plants and trees got burned pretty bad. Here are a few photos...

My Pritchadia Pacifica

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another photo

f6.jpg

miniature ixora

f8.jpg

crinum lily

f7.jpg

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sur4z

The hyophorbe lagenicaulis took a little hit.

f5.jpg

But my bismarckia noblis did not.

f4.jpg

And the kerriodoxa elegans got shredded but not burned.

f3.jpg

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bubba

Pedro, This confirms our discussions regarding the damage to your Pritchardia,ixora and lily at the back of your yard. It is obvious that the cold air rolls over the top of your house and creates a "cold hole" at the back where these specimens are located. Blooming Ixhoras all over compared to that poor anihilated specimen!

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palmislandRandy
Pedro, This confirms our discussions regarding the damage to your Pritchardia,ixora and lily at the back of your yard. It is obvious that the cold air rolls over the top of your house and creates a "cold hole" at the back where these specimens are located. Blooming Ixhoras all over compared to that poor anihilated specimen!

I noticed the same thing. Plants out in the open fared better than some of their "protected" brethren against the house.

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sur4z

During this period the wind was generally out of the WNW and my burned plants were on the South side of the house which should have been somewhat protected. The k.elegans above is on the North side and should have been blasted. The following palms are also on the North side and made it through fine.

coco

f14.jpg

v.montgomeryana

f13.jpg

d.album

f12.jpg

c.radiata

f15.jpg

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bubba

Pedro, Go figure. Everything on the North, which should have been torched, looks great.Green Coconuts, perfect V.montgomeries,green K.elegans, green Hurricanes and a green Thrinax radiata. A riddle wrapped in a mystery.

I no like the cold!

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spockvr6
Pedro, Go figure. Everything on the North, which should have been torched, looks great.Green Coconuts, perfect V.montgomeries,green K.elegans, green Hurricanes and a green Thrinax radiata. A riddle wrapped in a mystery.

I no like the cold!

Same in my yard....the south side got blasted harder than the north side!

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spockvr6
From January 2nd to January 12th South Florida experience the longest period of nights in the 30's and 40's since the 1940s. I live about 300 yards from the Atlantic (I can't see it) so it never got below freezing but my plants and trees got burned pretty bad. Here are a few photos...

My Pritchadia Pacifica

f.jpg

another photo

f6.jpg

Yep.....looks about like mine :angry:

These are tender tender palms. My Coconut nearby doesnt look 1/10th as bad as the pacifica.

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gsn
I no like the cold!

Bubba ,

If I recall you were taunting the COLD back in late November ,early December saying BRING IT ON!!!

You got your wish, "IT GOT BRUNG!" just sayin :lol:

South side, north side,east side,west side, didn't matter here!

The only things not completely fried are things under some canopy, and that even didn't help much here! :angry:

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gsn

I agree it is kinda strange, as conventional wisdom would say southern exposures should be somewhat warmer? :hmm:

Although there was nothing conventional about this COLD episode for Florida at least!

Edited by gsn

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bubba

Scott, No question! I forget who said "bring it on" but remember saying I will believe when I see it. Well, I saw it and I do not want it. I guess I will listen the next time Keith talks about those sunspots!

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gsytch

I live in SW pasco, appx 24 mi due N of St pete. My yard took a hit all around although I do not believe anything is lost - just burnt. However, I teach in Hudson, 14 NE of me, inland, rural, and at the end of the "Brooksville Valley". HUGE palms, Queens and Washingtons, are toasted. I saw a large orange tree completely browned. A L chinensis totally burnt up there. As I progressed toward my area, damage lessened considerably. Funny, My roeb's were fine except for one that receives ZERO winter sun due to the house but full summer sun. It is toasted, all brown, I guess from frost and or duration of cold. It'll be back quickly, but what a surprise...Greg in New Port Richey my pruners are my best friend now!

AND.........watch out for the first week of February. There are signs a comin'...I'm praying it veers north! :angry:

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SunnyFl
I live in SW pasco, appx 24 mi due N of St pete. My yard took a hit all around although I do not believe anything is lost - just burnt. However, I teach in Hudson, 14 NE of me, inland, rural, and at the end of the "Brooksville Valley". HUGE palms, Queens and Washingtons, are toasted. I saw a large orange tree completely browned. A L chinensis totally burnt up there. As I progressed toward my area, damage lessened considerably. Funny, My roeb's were fine except for one that receives ZERO winter sun due to the house but full summer sun. It is toasted, all brown, I guess from frost and or duration of cold. It'll be back quickly, but what a surprise...Greg in New Port Richey my pruners are my best friend now!

That is some bad damage if queens & washies were that bad. Glad to hear your place fared better, and I hope all your plants do pull through. The roeb will recover I'm sure - these are incredible little palms, they look much more tropical, but they can stand a lot of cold.

AND.........watch out for the first week of February. There are signs a comin'...I'm praying it veers north! :angry:
Oh no - what have you heard?

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SunnyFl

Here's something strange - of all the plants that got fried at my place, palms are the ones that seem the most likely to recover.

The jatropha is dead. The hib that wasn't under canopy is dead. The adeniums are dead. The bougies - even a couple of huge ones - are dead. All crotons except for the little ones under canopy of the toasted lutescenses, are dead - even the ones we thought looked a bit better, and so on.

But we have hope that the D. lutescens will pull through. The roeb is fine, not a mark on it. The morrissii is fine, the azul looks okay. Jury's out on the lepto, but the spear hasn't pulled. Not sure about the spindle - time will tell. It's seen lower temps, but not frost, until last week.

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bubba

Sunny, I am with you. No more cold! Another period of extensive cold would be not good for anyone.

Gystch, What is it about Brooksville that makes it so cold. I had a friend at UF from Brooksville whose family was in citrus. I am afraid to call him!

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sur4z

An interesting occurance occurred today. When I went outside this morning to get the paper, I noticed that there were palm fronds everywhere on the ground...three hurricanes, one montgomery and two macarthurs. Also there was one christmas frond down in the back yard. Very odd that they would all fall on the same day. It seems to me these trees went into shock during the cold spell and are now again growing. Anyone have any thoughts on this anomaly.

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_Keith
Here's something strange - of all the plants that got fried at my place, palms are the ones that seem the most likely to recover.

The jatropha is dead. The hib that wasn't under canopy is dead. The adeniums are dead. The bougies - even a couple of huge ones - are dead. All crotons except for the little ones under canopy of the toasted lutescenses, are dead - even the ones we thought looked a bit better, and so on.

But we have hope that the D. lutescens will pull through. The roeb is fine, not a mark on it. The morrissii is fine, the azul looks okay. Jury's out on the lepto, but the spear hasn't pulled. Not sure about the spindle - time will tell. It's seen lower temps, but not frost, until last week.

I'll bet that Jatropha comes back from the roots. Even up here in cold Zone 9a, mine returns faithfully every year, inspit of that fact that I had written it off for dead on more than one occaision.

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gsytch

Bubba- It just seems to be some low valley that gets incredibly cold. The dewpoints drop like a rock there. I would go with 8b/9a for rural Hernando county because some teachers I work with stated 18F as their low, a full ten degrees lower than mine. February?????? Another Greenland High Block is stated to set up, and we all know what happened the last time! I am watching the set up as one CANNOT imagine the same thing happening twice, can it? And, in the same winter? Greg

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palmislandRandy
An interesting occurance occurred today. When I went outside this morning to get the paper, I noticed that there were palm fronds everywhere on the ground...three hurricanes, one montgomery and two macarthurs. Also there was one christmas frond down in the back yard. Very odd that they would all fall on the same day. It seems to me these trees went into shock during the cold spell and are now again growing. Anyone have any thoughts on this anomaly.

I was talking to Marshall of Folsom Palms today about the same thing. The downed fronds wern't all that brown & the crownshafts all kinda look like they kinda shrunk from the cold & split. The bottom fronds fell even if they were still mostly green. I see bottom fronds down everywhere. Randy

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Tommy MacLuckie

Your Rhapis look a tiny bit burned. It got down to 18 degrees by the lake shore (I'm in Mandeville, LA - people go on and on about "radiant heat from the lake" but it was colder by the lake than it was where I am, 1/4 a mile away so so much for that 'radiant heat' theory - 18 degrees is still 18 degrees, lake or not) and I have a Rhapis at my father-in-law's house (about 500 feet? from he lake) and it, along with everything else in his yard, did not get covered (too much to cover). The Rhapis along with the Med Fan, various Sabals and the Windmills are fine.

All the Queens are cooked, the Roeb's are cooked, Chinese fans are burnt pretty bad, the Canary Island has slight burnage on the oldest fronds and both Washingtonia's are turning. A few other things are cooked as well, like all the various bananas of course... etc.

Have to wait to see if there is outright death of the Queens and Roebs. Based on literature I've read, the Roeb's are dead dead. The Queens should be dead. And according to some literature the Sabals should be dead as well but so far they are 100% fine.

There are people here that have planted Foxtails as well as a few other tender palms - I have, as well as other people, Ravenea rivularis. I would think they are outright dead too. In fact, there are huge ones on the Southshore (in New Orleans and Metairie) and those should be dead as well since it got down to 23 there).

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gsytch

I've noticed that many palms and tropicals are showing damage NOW that looked ok last week. Some palms in the area are showing burn - not a disaster - but burning, brown leaves. My crotons that looked ok are dropping leaves left and right. My orchids, most of which were in a covered shadehouse and heated, have dropped leaves (mostly phals and dendrobiums) and my bromeliads all over the yard have browned here and there. Some are fine, most have burning My Foxtails and Fishtails have all turned dark brown but with green stems. This occurred in the past week. I guess it was a looooooooooooooong cold spell that did it! Greg who ENJOYED A BALMY 82f yesterday! Now reality...60's/40 Tue and Wed :drool:

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naraj

Hey guys, I realize I'm way late on this question, but here goes:

I'm in Palm Beach too, and I'm wondering if maybe the reason the 'protected' palms/plants were more damaged was because during a freak cold snap, protected palms do better because their absolute low temp doesn't get quite as low (also, no frost), but in a prolonged cold spell, they don't get as much warmth from the sun, which keeps them cooler than the unprotected palms during a prolonged cool spell.

What do you guys think?

I'm trying to avoid having a repeat of sur4z's scenario, because I'm doing exactly what he did, LOL.

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