Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
JayW

Serenoa Repens (silver) cold damage...

Recommended Posts

JayW

I have some growing out in the field, after yesterdays 19.6* low, they were covered in frost, and today, I noticed they are very spotty... I'm hoping they will be ok?

This was taken at around 8:30 am on 1-7-10

DSCF1122.jpg

Edited by JayW

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dave-Vero

That's a lot of frost, but the species is native into southern South Carolina. Of course saw palmettos usually inhabit locations with frequent low-intensity fires, as often as once a year. The plants are extremely good at quickly building new leaves to replace the toasted ones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JayW

I guess tonight will be the real test? We'll see how cold it really gets... I'm hoping for some wind!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
_Keith

I am guessing, in the long run, they won't even be fazed by this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JayW

Well, I noticed yesterday, that as of right now, there are 6 silver ones and 5 green ones that have lost the spear! I was looking close and noticed it had dried and curled up, I gently pulled and they came out with ease and were brown at the point of where it broke off and shriveled up. It's from the cold and possibly rain during and after. I treated them with peroxide yesterday and have my fingers crossed. Anyone ever see this with Saw Palmettos? Low was 16.7* and 2 other days were at 19*.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gsn

Jay,

I have heard these develop more cold tolerence as they get older,but can be somewhat more tender at an early age,unfortunately. Had they been mature palms I don't think those temps would have bothered them to much?

They are pretty tuff palms and will most likely recover from spear pull, as and added bonus this is a suckering palm,so they might come back from the roots,even if the main stems die.I hope they recover for you, as it takes them a pretty good while even to get to the size of yours!

Edited by gsn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JayW
Jay,

I have heard these develop more cold tolerence as they get older,but can be somewhat more tender at an early age,unfortunately. Had they been mature palms I don't think those temps would have bothered them to much?

They are pretty tuff palms and will most likely recover from spear pull, as and added bonus this is a suckering palm,so they might come back from the roots,even if the main stems die.I hope they recover for you, as it takes them a pretty good while even to get to the size of yours!

I've heard the same thing, that they get more cold tolerant with age... I just hope the ones with the spear pulls can come back from this years cold. There still seem to be a lot of them that were not affected, but 1 out of 5 probably have spear pull. I'm keeping my fingers crossed!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
jayfro6

Hey Jay,

I bought 15 potted silver Serenoa repens from a nursery nearby that probably got down in the upper teens last winter. They all looked good, but more than half had spear-pull on one of the growing points. They all recovered very quickly with new growth, with only one of the "branches" actually dying. I wouldn't worry too much, because I have close to 50 Serenoa plants, and they will just up and die out of the blue for no apparent reason even after growing fine for 2 years. The others will catch on and branch off in every direction to fill in the void eventually. I've seen some greenish-silver Serenoa repens growing naturally as far inland as St. Cloud, but never in any zone 8 areas, so chances are it's more tender than the green form.

Here is the St. Cloud version. Not my favorite silver color, but I like them all.

Oct212009016-1.jpg

Oct212009019.jpg

Oct212009022-1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JayW
Hey Jay,

I bought 15 potted silver Serenoa repens from a nursery nearby that probably got down in the upper teens last winter. They all looked good, but more than half had spear-pull on one of the growing points. They all recovered very quickly with new growth, with only one of the "branches" actually dying. I wouldn't worry too much, because I have close to 50 Serenoa plants, and they will just up and die out of the blue for no apparent reason even after growing fine for 2 years. The others will catch on and branch off in every direction to fill in the void eventually. I've seen some greenish-silver Serenoa repens growing naturally as far inland as St. Cloud, but never in any zone 8 areas, so chances are it's more tender than the green form.

Thanks for the info, Jay. The plants still look pretty good, I was just really surprised to find some of the new spears all dried up like that after they looked to have made it through just fine. As for my Bismarkia, that's another story. All of the leaves were toast and spongy and starting to break. I cut them all back and now have a fried spear and am keeping my fingers crossed. My Sabal Minors, Sabal Louisiana's, Sabal Lisa's, Sabal Palmettos, Needles, Euro and windmill are all untouched. I took in about 90% of the 1 gallon Sabal Lisa's and left the rest outside, but under my carport just to see how they'd fair. They all look the same and were untouched!

Jay

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Dave-Vero

Saw palmettos are notoriously difficult to transplant. About 2005, I bought a beautiful container-grown silver from an excellent native plant grower. For the first year, it died back until it looked ready to die. Then the surviving growing tips came back to life. Now it's a thriving clump, maybe 5 feet across and 4 feet tall.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
gsn

I have some growing out in the field, after yesterdays 19.6* low, they were covered in frost, and today, I noticed they are very spotty... I'm hoping they will be ok?

This was taken at around 8:30 am on 1-7-10

DSCF1122.jpg

I have NEVER had any problem transplanting serenoa from a pot into the ground.

However transplanting from being in the ground to another ground location is a whole different story,success rate is very low.

They do NOT like to have their roots cut,they bleed from doing so.

Jays'saw palmetos look like they were growing extremely well before the freeze as this pic shows.

Again I hope they make it Jay!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Austinpalm

One 5-10-gallon sized plant under live oak canopy exhibited 30% defoliation (oldest fronds) after a low of 16F with several other nighttime lows in the upper 20's and low 30's. No additional protection was given.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Plott Palm Trees

This has been a very interesting post, thank you all that shared. I am always intrigued by the cold hardy palms and how much Cold they can take...I always thought that Saw Palmettos in general could survive below zero, but I guess not and would you say that a Sabal Palm is more Cold hardy than the Saw Palmetto? Just Curious, hope to hear from some one. rock.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
TexasColdHardyPalms

 Zero burn on these tiny, virtually white specimens after 12F and 30 hours straight below freezing.  

30900.jpeg

30901.jpeg

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...