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Alberto

Butia capitata x Parajubaea cocoides

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Brahea Axel

I didn't realize they were that tender. Glenn, did you post a report in the freeze section?

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tank

My spear got funked up during a mild freeze as well. H2O2 and some summer heat and it is starting to take off. Looks much better than my Jubutyagrus that seems to have caught a case of the uglys.

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Brahea Axel

Seems to defeat the point of the cross if they are that tender. P. cocoides survived 14F in Alameda County in 1990, (fully defoliated of course) and butia is tough. I would have expected more from these hybrids.

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Tropicdoc

I agree, Axel. What would be the point of the cross? That is extremely disappointing. Could the B.p. cross be less tender than the B.o. cross that has been bulletproof in the Dick Douglas garden? I wish Paul Gallop in Pensacola would chime in. I spent the money on these palms because he told me they were hardy in his climate, which is identical to mine.

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ghar41

Ouch on the spear pull. I won't let mine see freezing until taller than my 8 foot greenhouse and then will have a few lights or heat cable near the spear

The spears did not pull out; they take on a necrotic look inside the cup....and then don't push up until they are treated with H2O2. Not sure why...just my experience here. Once the spear pushes and opens the leaf ends up looking like this...

DSC_0009_zps36e807d2.jpg

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Tropicdoc

I don't know if yall can see, the emerging spear of this one had the same thing when I got this palm from Patrick. I didn't know what it was. I never thought it could be from cold. The palm has another spear pushing anyways.

post-7690-0-24613000-1402688004_thumb.jp

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tank

Mules do the same thing when they are small. They grow out of it. ALL of my mules, except for the large one that I transplanted, had damaged spears the first two years they were planted out with temps in the low 20sF. All were planted as either 3 or 5 gal plants. They quit showing freeze damage on the spear when the got over 6 - 8' tall.

Guessing this will be the case with the B x PJ cross. Also, even though the spear was damaged, none of the older leaves show the slightest burn. Same exact experience for me with mules.

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Brahea Axel

Mules do the same thing when they are small. They grow out of it. ALL of my mules, except for the large one that I transplanted, had damaged spears the first two years they were planted out with temps in the low 20sF. All were planted as either 3 or 5 gal plants. They quit showing freeze damage on the spear when the got over 6 - 8' tall.

Guessing this will be the case with the B x PJ cross. Also, even though the spear was damaged, none of the older leaves show the slightest burn. Same exact experience for me with mules.

I bet you are right, they gain a lot of hardiness with age. There is no way that a cross from two solid parents would be that tender. I hope this is the case with alfredii as well, they behave in a very similar manner as juveniles, spears are tender but the leaves are hardy and they grow out of the damage rather quickly.

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krishnaraoji88

I had spear pull on both my BxP and JxS for the first few years in the ground. They both seem to have outgrown the tendency to do it after about 3 winters.

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Tropicdoc

Good info gentlemen! Thanks.

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Tropicdoc

Axel, you say B. alfredii fronds are hardy? I guess to cold, but not frost. We have so much frost here! That's why I am opting for this hybrid instead of alfredii for "coconut palms" near my pool.

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iwan

Spear pulled and mostly defoliated after more than 200 combined hours of freezing temps in December 2013. Three days in the low 20's with 12-15 hour freeze durations. Ultimate low 20.1F

Unprotected. It is slowly recovering and is now back to about the size it was prior to the freeze.

As others have commented the hybrids for me seem to get bud rot/damage when young if exposed to the lower 20's. I would recommend protecting them for the first couple of years if Zone 9A temps or lower are expected.

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