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Jeff Searle

Garden Tour of our Yard

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Jeff Searle

Dypsis onilahensis. This is seeding now for me.

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Jeff Searle

A pathway going around the corner of the house. The palm on the right is Syagrus picrophylla.

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Jeff Searle

A look at our pool and patio area. Behind the small table, is a Dwarf Areca catechu.The large palm on the left is Beccariophoenix madagascariensis. The large up-right palm on the right is a Dypsis cabadae. The fan leaf palm off to the right and in the back is Livistona chinensis and finally, a curved trunk Ptychosperma elegans is leaning out over the pool.

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BS Man about Palms

I'm comin' for the POOL party!!!! :cool:

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Jeff Searle

(BS, Man about Palms @ Nov. 29 2006,23:18)

QUOTE
I'm comin' for the POOL party!!!! :cool:

Bill,

   You are certainly welcome to visit and stay with us. The one question that I have is, will you be bringing one of the ranch hands with you? If so, I'd like to see a "pic. of the choice". :)

 Jeff

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redant

Amazing work for the time you have been there, a great selection of palms and other plants.

What was the soil there when you started? Did you amend it before you started planting?

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BS Man about Palms

(Jeff Searle @ Nov. 30 2006,06:01)

QUOTE

(BS @ Man about Palms,Nov. 29 2006,23:18)

QUOTE
I'm comin' for the POOL party!!!! :cool:

Bill,

   You are certainly welcome to visit and stay with us. The one question that I have is, will you be bringing one of the ranch hands with you? If so, I'd like to see a "pic. of the choice". :)

 Jeff

I'll have to see whos in the labor POOL....  :o

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BobbyinNY

Jeff your yard is absolutely stunning....... I can't wait to come and visit the nursery.....  I love the groupings and placement of everything in addition to alot of the rare stuff you have.. I especially like that Copernicia macroglossa. That is very interesting, also the agaves and century plant.

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Dave-Vero

Very impressive for such a young yard.  I suspect Georgia Tasker would encourage a few hammock trees.

Looks like my little Copernicia berteroana will look good in the yard, even though it's not nearly as charismatic as C. baileyana, which is just too large.  I've still got to see if Satakentia liukuensis is worth trying this far north.  Meanwhile, I added a little needle palm to the back yard this week.

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deezpalms

Wow Jeff! Everything looks so nice and well kept. You truly are the master of your jungle and I too will be at the next pool party  :o

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geonomaDude

You have a very nice backyard Jeff.

I hope to have one like yours someday.

---

Adolfo, Costa Rica :cool:

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Joe palma

Wow Jeff! This is the first time I am having a look at this thread and am totally impressed! Nice work and mix of stuff in such a short time. You have an incredible botanical garden! No doubt lots of hard work and a show of your passion for the rarer palms and cycads. Lots of palm nursery people don't spend the time, and money, to have what you have got in their yards.

That's the largest Syagrus picrophylla I have seen in anybodys garden. Have any botryphoras growing?

Nice Carpoxylons and Satakentias as well! Massive bizzies too.

Definitely have to stop by when I am back in FL visiting family next year.

You are an insperation to us all.

Thanks for posting and keep the pictures coming!

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Mark Heath

Jeff,

Impressive might i add!   Did you plant the XButiagrus that i gave you?  Would love to see what size it is by now!

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tim_brissy_13

Thanks for posting such great photos of your impressive yard Jeff.

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Jeff Searle

(Joe palma @ Nov. 30 2006,15:37)

QUOTE
Wow Jeff! This is the first time I am having a look at this thread and am totally impressed! Nice work and mix of stuff in such a short time. You have an incredible botanical garden! No doubt lots of hard work and a show of your passion for the rarer palms and cycads. Lots of palm nursery people don't spend the time, and money, to have what you have got in their yards.

That's the largest Syagrus picrophylla I have seen in anybodys garden. Have any botryphoras growing?

Nice Carpoxylons and Satakentias as well! Massive bizzies too.

Definitely have to stop by when I am back in FL visiting family next year.

You are an insperation to us all.

Thanks for posting and keep the pictures coming!

Joe,

   You are welcome to come by anytime. For that matter, anyone that ever comes down this way, please drop me a line, I'm always showing people around the nursery.

 As far as Syagrus boty. I do have 3 small ones planted(7') in a group.

 Jeff

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SunnyFl

(Jeff Searle @ Nov. 29 2006,20:47)

QUOTE
Dypsis onilahensis. This is seeding now for me.

Oh.

My.

Word!

[[colllapses on floor]]  THUD!

What a sight - incredibly beautiful!  It's gorgeous, Jeff, as is the rest of your gardens, looks like paradise.

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Jeff Searle

Another angle looking at a Beccariophoenix madagascariensis with croton "Pops Yard" in front.

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Jeff Searle

Dypsis cabadae approx. 15' tall and now starting to seed. These were about 8' when planted. They were grown in our field and transplanted over to the yard.

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Jeff Searle

Chambeyronia macrocarpa.

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Jeff Searle

A Livistona chinensis with a group of Foxtail-Veithchia ( Foxy Ladies) off to the left.

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Jeff Searle

Looking through the Dypsis cabadae is a bent trunk Ptychosperma elegans. Behind that is the Foxtail-Veitchias.

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Jeff Searle

Looking into a pathway of Ptychosperma lauterbachii. Notice the leaning trunks that were caused from Hurricane Wilma last year. I have decided to leave them for interest.

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Logolight

Jeff, you certainly are the Grand Master of palm trees I must say.  You could open the place up as a botanical garden and make money.  

The wife and I are trying to make plans to come down there within the next couple of months to take pictures with our brand new digital camera so I'll try to detour and wave hello as I drive by the nursury.

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BS Man about Palms

Jeff- VERY cool......in another 5 years, I see a jungle.....AWESOME!

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Jeff Searle

A small Dictyosperma aureum var. conjugatum. A short growing palm with the leaflet tips held together with persistent reins.

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Jeff Searle

A group of Kentiopsis oliviformis. These were field grown and brought over as large palms. One has started to flower now.

Just for kicks, here in South Florida I sell these out the field,balled and burlap for $75 per foot over-all. Thats my wholesale price.

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Jeff Searle

This is not a great picture, but this is what I believe to be Dypsis pilulifera. Off to the left is a clump of Chamaedorea brachypoda.

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Jeff Searle

A large Chamaedorea cataractarum. It produces lots of seed. This is planted in front of our Turtle pen. We have a  African spurtheigh( I'm sure this is spelled wrong, sorry ??? ) 2 Redfoots, and 2 Hindgebacks. The turtle thing is Andrea's" thing".

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Jeff Searle

A double Clinostigma harlandii with a couple of small Arenga westerhoutii to the right.  Notice our turtle bench?

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Jeff Searle

Dypsis carlsmithii.

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Jeff Searle

A clump of Bambusa vulgaris Vattata.The cycad in the lower corner is Zamia fairchildiana.

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bruno

Jeff your palace is superb! Maybe some day I drop by?... Can you tell me what makes a dypsis cabadae a cabadae? What recognisable signs on it? It looks like one of the 3 forms of the lutescens. And your pilulifera does not look at all like the one I have seen in ranomafana! The leaflets are different.

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Jeff Searle

Arenga undulatifolia. The croton in the lower left is the variety "Tortise Shell".

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Jeff Searle

(bruno @ Dec. 03 2006,13:15)

QUOTE
Jeff your palace is superb! Maybe some day I drop by?... Can you tell me what makes a dypsis cabadae a cabadae? What recognisable signs on it? It looks like one of the 3 forms of the lutescens. And your pilulifera does not look at all like the one I have seen in ranomafana! The leaflets are different.

Hello Bruno,

   If you ever get down this way, you better drop by!

Well,D.lutescens and D. cabadae both have regular leaflets and both are clustering palms. Probably the biggest give-away is that D. lutescens usually always has a yellow coloring in the petiole, rachis and leaf sheath. To me, the trunks are much greener in D. cabadae with some silvery-white on the leaf sheath. And the over-all leaf is straighter, where as the leaf is more recurved on a D. lutescens.

  And in regards to my pic. of what "I think" might be Dypsis pilulifera, I still believe there's two different leaf forms. Regular and group leaflets. Just my opinion.

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Jeff Searle

A varigated Caryota mitis. This came from Floribunda Palms as a seedling.

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Jeff Searle

Up-close of the same.

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Jeff Searle

Zamia elegantissima, native to Panama.

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Jeff Searle

A beautiful Dombeya in full bloom this time of year.

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Jeff Searle

Group of Licuala grandis with croton variety "Tiffany" on left.

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Jeff Searle

A rare Licuala peekelii from New Guinea in seed.

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