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2006 IPS Biennial - Republica Dominicana

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Palmarum

2006 IPS Biennial - DR

Day 5 - Wednesday, October 4th

Jaragua National Park

- (11:16am) As the helicopters returned, more of Group B (Green) left for the site. Hard to depict in the photo, but the helicopter was idling, so everyone had to follow the procedure of keeping their heads down and taking their hats off. On the right side of the photo are forum members Jack Sayers (elHoagie) and Jon Kenahan (Bilbo).

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- (11:18am) Former IPS Vice President Leland Lai and myself trade photographs.

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- (11:20am) The majority of Group B (Green) waiting for our turns to go. Jeff & Andrea Searle watching a helicopter lift off, with Jim Glock behind them watching another one fly away in the distance.

IPS_2005-10-04_11-20-02.jpg

- (11:20am) During the biennial, there were many occasions to mingle with the locals, and it was very enjoyable and educational. One attendee, expeditionary guide Randall Quirk, brought several soccer balls to the Dominican Republic to give as gifts. Here is one view of his generosity in action.

For those of you who I know will ask, yes there is a small air pump in the bag with the soccer ball.

IPS_2005-10-04_11-20-20.jpg

Ryan

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Palmarum

2006 IPS Biennial - DR

Day 5 - Wednesday, October 4th

Jaragua National Park

As the third helicopter left the cow pasture, we were informed that when they returned they would need to be refueled, ahead of schedule. This created a delay in the middle of Group B's time at the site in the park. Originally, we were told to carry our box lunches onto the helicopter and eat them at the site. Since we now have a wait upon us, most of Group B decided to eat lunch now.

- (11:22am) The second helicopter returning and setting down to be refueled, as many watched.

IPS_2005-10-04_11-22-52.jpg

- (11:24am) Forum member Kathryn Ostadal (Kathryn)

with attendee and friend Jayanne Crawley walk over to the catering area as the third helicopter returns for more fuel.

IPS_2005-10-04_11-24-50.jpg

- (11:27am) The remaining three-quarters of Group B (Green) sitting down enjoying our lunch. There was never a shortage of conversation topics, whenever my group sat down together. Jeff & Andrea Searle on both sides of Jim Glock, enjoying lunch.

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- (11:31am) On the left, one of the helicopters being tended to by the refueling truck, as the locals look on. Always anxious and ready to go at a seconds notice, are attendees Ray & Theresa Gompf in the center watching everything. No one can compare to them when it comes to energy and enthusiasm, except maybe the Energizer Bunny.

IPS_2005-10-04_11-31-26.jpg

Ryan

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Palmarum

2006 IPS Biennial - DR

Day 5 - Wednesday, October 4th

Jaragua National Park

When refueling was completed, and lunch was finished, we arranged ourselves back into our 5-person groups and waited for our turn to fly. For almost everyone at the biennial, including attendees from the Dominican Republic, this was their first time to this extremely remote area of the country. The Jaragua National Park consists of 340,000 acres or 1,600 sq. kilometers of dry scrub forest near the southern end of the Bahoruco Mountains. 130 species of native birds, about 60 percent of the Dominican Republic's entire avian community, reside here in this one park. There are no tourist facilities here of any kind, so hardly anyone (minus very lucky biennial attendees) ever come to this park. Ironically, the most spectacular beaches of the Dominican Republic are found in Jaragua National Park. This fact might lead to future development, but for now the whole area is strictly protected.

- (11:56am) And we're off! My group of five: Jeff & Andrea Searle, Jim & Judy Glock, and myself lifted off close to noon. I took this parting shot over Jim Glock's shoulder and out the window as the helicopter gained altitude.

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- (11:57am) An aerial view of the Jaragua National Park, as we flew to the forward landing site.

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- (12:00pm) A huge sense of shock and awe fell over the passenger compartment of the helicopter as we all reacted to seeing hundreds, thousands of Pseudophoenix ekmanii everywhere! And I do mean everywhere. It was hard to fathom the sight, as this palm is so slow in cultivation, and ultra rare as a result. One attendee easily summed up the experience as "mind-blowing".

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- (12:00pm) The helicopter began its decent, and I kept on taking pictures. This photo was taken as the helicopter pitched backward to slow our momentum. Those bright-white internodes of Pseudophoenix ekmanii can be seen from a good distance away.

IPS_2005-10-04_12-00-38.jpg

Ryan

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Jeff Searle

Ryan,

     "Behind the scenes" I have thanked you many times,but I want to take the time now to really thank-you!! These pics. are just awsome and my memories from this ride in the helicopter will last for a lifetime. Keep the pics. coming!

   JEFF

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Walter John

I met someone today who was at the biennial. Our local chapter (BPACS) visited his old residence here in Brisbane to see how the palms he planted many years ago are now fairing. I may post some more pics from this outing, the palms were not looked after and some faired badly.

His name is John Price and he is somewhat of a palm legend here in Australia.

Here he is with a Copernicia hospita behind right.

Did any of you meet and talk with John ?

A_johnpricecopernicia.jpg

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Zac in NC

Wow!!!! Please continue. I am enjoying the Biennial from here in NC in  the cold rain. It is warming me up just to think of the temperature of the Dominican Republic.

Zac

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elHoagie

Ryan - These pics are awesome, I've been looking forward to logging in and seeing 'em every day since you started this.

Wal -  I did meet John Price briefly on the first day, but I didn't run into him again after that...  I enjoyed talking with him, and he seems like a good guy.

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Palmarum
His name is John Price and he is somewhat of a palm legend here in Australia.

Did any of you meet and talk with John ?

I was lucky enough to had briefly met him at the few occasions all attendees were at the same location. He has a wealth of knowledge, I wish I was able to had spent more time talking with him and many other attendees.

2006 IPS Biennial - DR

Day 5 - Wednesday, October 4th

Jaragua National Park

As the helicopter ride got all of our blood flowing, rich with adrenaline, we touched down at the forward landing site. This was basically a clearing created deep into the scrub forest of the park, near a density of Pseudophoenix ekmanii. Since there was a delay with refueling the helicopters, the majority of Group B (Green) was told we had just 30 minutes to look around until we had to leave. This was needed to keep the schedule with Group C (Orange).  There were paths created in the scrub forest, that guided us forward and back. There were also national park rangers on hand if we needed any assistance.

- (12:06pm) A short distance from the forward landing site, my group of five made contact with the remaining members of Group A (Blue) as they were making their way back. The surrounding scrub forest is common throughout the park, mostly it consisted of the toughest plants known, including cacti, plumeria, kalanchoe, and many other die-hard plants.

IPS_2005-10-04_12-06-50.jpg

- (12:08pm) A juvenile Pseudophoenix ekmanii. This in itself was a incredible sight as well, since there are no plants this size in cultivation -- and no one would publish a photo of one so small, with so many larger ones around.

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- (12:15pm) A grouping of different sized specimens, a good distance from the landing site. The disfigured one in the center had already been harvested for its sweet sap, or 'cacheo'.

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- (12:16pm) Not far from the above group, was this individual Pseudophoenix ekmanii who had been cut open recently for us attendees to try the sweet sap 'cacheo' inside. The palm is named after this sap, with its local vernacular name being 'Cacheo' or 'Cacheo de Oviedo'. The locals who harvest the sap sometimes eat it raw, but most often will ferment it into wine. I heard rumors of biennial attendees who found bottles of cacheo wine in one of the cities. Personally, I didn't try any of the sap. It was a bit strange for me to see a palm of such high rarity and value, deliberatly cut. But it is part of the local culture, and it has been for a long time.

IPS_2005-10-04_12-16-04.jpg

Ryan

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Palmarum

2006 IPS Biennial - DR

Day 5 - Wednesday, October 4th

Jaragua National Park

With our 30 minute deadline hovering over us, we tended to rush through a bit. I did get to take all the photos I wanted plus some extra ones. Many people wanted their photos taken with these incredible palms, and I was happy to oblige.

- (12:19pm) Further along the path, we came across this moderate specimen, a short distance off the path. Since we did not know how far ahead were other palms, versus our time limit, we posed with this healthy one. Jeff Searle doing just that.

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- (12:19pm) A close-up of the crown of the same Pseudophoenix ekmanii.

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- (12:22pm) Houston chapter President Paul Norris poses with delight, as many others did.

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- (12:25pm) A palm we made sure not to over look, was Coccothrinax ekmanii, the major Coccothrinax representative in the park. This smaller individual was growing not far from the path, with many other taller ones nearby.

IPS_2005-10-04_12-25-16.jpg

Ryan

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redant

Great pictures as always Ryan. God it's hard to see such a beautiful rare palm like that hacked open.

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Zac in NC

I agree with redant on the sympathy over that poor Pseudophoenix. As Ryan said though, this is their culture, much like the unfortunate tapping of Jubaea in Chile.

Zac

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Palmarum

2006 IPS Biennial - DR

Day 5 - Wednesday, October 4th

Jaragua National Park

We ventured further into the park, taking photos along the way, until we came upon a fork in the path. Attendees who had passed us going back told us to go to the left, while others said go right. After a few seconds of deciding, a park ranger came along and guided us to the left.

- (12:26pm) Walking along at a fevered pace, Paul Norris noticed a seedling Coccothrinax ekmanni growing out of a hole in the limestone. I bent down to take this shot, holding one of its leaves. You can see how rocky the terrain was, as this limestone was sharp, and very porous.

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- (12:26pm) Not more than six feet away, was this larger palm, literally growing in a hole. Many of the larger Coccothrinax ekmanii has stems the same diameter of the holes they were growing out of.

IPS_2005-10-04_12-26-46.jpg

- (12:27pm) A robust juvenile Pseudophoenix ekmanii just beginning to grow trunk. Jeff Searle and I, were contemplating on just how much that palm would be worth in a 25 gallon container, as growers would. We kept throwing large numbers back and forth at each other.

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- (12:31pm) Near the fork in the path, there were an abundance of Pseudophoenix ekmanii seedlings. It was nice to know that this species was protected, and will continue to prosper.

IPS_2005-10-04_12-31-54.jpg

Ryan

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Palmarum
Great pictures as always Ryan. God it's hard to see such a beautiful rare palm like that hacked open.

I agree with redant on the sympathy over that poor Pseudophoenix. As Ryan said though, this is their culture, much like the unfortunate tapping of Jubaea in Chile.

Zac

There was evidence of this collecting just about everywhere, but many of the palms were surviving at least. And some where even flowering, however disfigured.

2006 IPS Biennial - DR

Day 5 - Wednesday, October 4th

Jaragua National Park

After following the park ranger for a short distance from the fork in the path, we came around a corner and saw a massive specimen of Pseudophoenix ekmanii just gleaming with bright white internodes. In the distance we can hear our guides yelling for "Green Group to get going", and to hurry back to the site. I tried to ignore that and absorb as much of this palm as I could. I still remember reading palm books as a young kid (which I did), looking up the description of this species and wondering what it might look like in the wild...

- (12:33pm) With time running out, we all admired and posed at the same time. Here is Jeff Searle giving this brute of a palm a hug.

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- (12:33pm) A close-up of the large, split leafbases just above the trunk.

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- (12:33pm) Biennial veteran Jim Glock, showing his appreciation for this fantastic palm.

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- (12:35pm) I couldn't go all this way without myself being in at least one photo. This was a truly great experience shared by all of us who saw this palm in the wild. A 'bookmark' in the lives of all of us palm junkies.

IPS_2005-10-04_12-35-30.jpg

Ryan

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Palmarum

2006 IPS Biennial - DR

Day 5 - Wednesday, October 4th

Jaragua National Park

The remaining members of Group B (Green) made our way back to the landing site for our ride back to the cow pasture. Following the path back took about 20 minutes. We all arranged ourselves back into our groups of five, so they could keep track of everyone so no one would be left behind. A very good strategy, since staying in the park would not be very hospitable.

- (12:54pm) Members of Group B (Green) begin to form their groups of five, and to wait for the next helicopter to land. Near the edge of the forward landing site, Christie Jones [center, yellow] talks with forum member Jack Sayers (elHoagie) [blue backpack], and attendee Lora Sakai [left, pink hat].

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- (12:56pm) IPS President Paul Craft looks back to see if the rest of his group are coming.

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- (12:59pm) One helicopter lands and the next group of five gets on board. Judy Norris gets upfront, while Paul Norris [orange hat] gets in the passenger compartment with forum member Joseph (Ortanique) and attendee Lora Sakai.

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- (1:00pm) Attendee Judy Norris waves from the helicopter as it begins to lift off.

IPS_2005-10-04_13-00-10.jpg

Ryan

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Palmarum

2006 IPS Biennial - DR

Day 5 - Wednesday, October 4th

Jaragua National Park

While my group of five were waiting for the next helicopter to arrive, we decided that a group photo in front of a helicopter would be nice to have. I decided to take it while the other four posed.

- (1:03pm) The other four in my group, Jeff & Andrea Searle, Jim & Judy Glock, make their way to the helicopter as I stay back to take photos.

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- (1:03pm) As the helicopter idles and creates a downdraft, they all turn and I take a series of photos. This is one with Jeff Searle waving back.

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- (1:03pm) I continue to shoot, as Jeff Searle gets on board. In the corner of my viewfinder, I notice Biennial Host Leonel Mera taking my seat on the helicopter... :D  

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- (1:04pm) I take a unique shot of my group beginning to take off without me (hehe). There was another helicopter inbound to the landing site, so I took a spot on that one. Here is Jim Glock and Andrea Searle waving back.

IPS_2005-10-04_13-04-42.jpg

Ryan

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Palmarum

2006 IPS Biennial - DR

Day 5 - Wednesday, October 4th

Jaragua National Park

A short wait went by and I boarded the next helicopter, with more members of Group B (Green).

- (1:09pm) I managed to get the seat upfront and took this photo through the cockpit window. Not shown in this photo, but on the center of the instrument panel is a fuel gauge that kept flashing "Fuel on Board 0 Gallons". I thought it was interesting, so I pointed it out to the pilot. He gave a wry smile and said "No worry" over the radio.

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- (1:10pm) One last look at Pseudophoenix ekmanii as we flew to the cow pasture.

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- (1:12pm) We began our descent to the cow pasture, as I photograph the staging area. The majority of Group B (Green) are already there, relaxing near the catering trunk.

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- (1:12pm) Same perspective as above, taken six seconds later as we got closer, showing more detail.

IPS_2005-10-04_13-12-28.jpg

Ryan

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Palmarum

2006 IPS Biennial - DR

Day 5 - Wednesday, October 4th

Jaragua National Park - Casa Bonita Hotel

When all of Group B (Green) returned from the forward landing site, we all gathered and relaxed, telling different perspectives of what we had seen in the park. A short wait went by quickly and we boarded the safari vehicles bound for the first staging area near Oviedo, where our bus awaited our return.

- (1:13pm) Jeff Searle feeds a dog belonging to one of the locals. I've never seen a sandwich disappear so quickly.

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- (1:22pm) Resting in a shady spot is forum member Kathryn Ostadal (Kathryn) chatting with Judy & Jim Glock.

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- (1:27pm) Returning helicopters land while locals watch on with their dog.

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- (1:42pm) We get on the safari vehicles and make our way to the first staging area to get on our bus and begin the ride back towards Barahona. Jim Glock watches on with Andrea & Jeff Searle.

IPS_2005-10-04_13-42-16.jpg

Ryan

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RainForestt Robert

Ryan

The photos of P. ekmanii alone would have made the trip worthwhile.  Great photo documentation and narrative.  I am sure based on your photos alone the next biennial will be oversubscribed.  Count me in!!

Robert

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Palmarum
The photos of P. ekmanii alone would have made the trip worthwhile. I am sure based on your photos alone the next biennial will be oversubscribed.  Count me in!!

Robert

Seeing Pseudophoenix ekmanii in the wild was a major highlight of the trip, and I've been told every biennial has one. So who knows what awaits in Costa Rica in 08...

2006 IPS Biennial - DR

Day 5 - Wednesday, October 4th

Casa Bonita Hotel

On our way back to Barahona, we were all invited to a early dinner at Casa Bonita Hotel, a small resort just outside the city. It is a small Bed and Breakfast style hotel perched up on a small hill, overlooking the Caribbean Sea. It was once a residence, but had been transformed into a hotel as of a few years ago.

- (3:43pm) Life on the Green Bus continues as usual during our two hour bus ride from Oviedo back to near Barahona. More hidden rum led to colorful renditions of stories and jokes I've never heard before, but nevertheless, the trip was comfortable and seemed to fly by. Close to 4 PM, we arrived at the bottom of the hill, were Casa Bonita Hotel was located. The shot was taken through the bus window, which explains the haze.

IPS_2005-10-04_15-43-34.jpg

- (3:56pm) The safari vehicles were again on hand, as an option to hiking the road up the hill, but most of my group and myself decided to walk it. Behind the hotel, facing the sea, was a large multi-level deck area. This held a large pool, spa, and one very nice view of the coast. This was the only time during the biennial where rain fell on us, and it was very light.

IPS_2005-10-04_15-56-28.jpg

- (3:56pm) Same location as above, shot in reverse towards the dinner and bar area. When we arrived, Group A (Blue) had been there for a short while, and we waited for Group C (Orange) to follow our arrival shortly.

IPS_2005-10-04_15-56-44.jpg

- (4:03pm) Near the bar, Jeff Searle stands next to our faithful tour guide Franklin Castillo. Being in charge of the Green Bus was a task I would not give to anyone lightly; but Franklin did a superb job of keeping us together, providing information, and making sure no one got left behind.

IPS_2005-10-04_16-03-56.jpg

Ryan

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Palmarum

2006 IPS Biennial - DR

Day 5 - Wednesday, October 4th

Casa Bonita Hotel

Shortly thereafter, Group C (Orange) arrived and the meeting was in full swing. Many discussed the day over several different drinks served at the bar and a seemingly endless supply of el Presidente beer.

- (4:05pm) Sitting down at one of the dinner tables was: (left to right) Carol & John DeMott, with South Florida attendee Ron Kiefert behind them, and Ken & Jackie St. Germain.

IPS_2005-10-04_16-05-12.jpg

- (4:05pm) Many attendees were scattered around the hotel, but many were enjoying shelter from the rain in the dinner area, under a new thatched roof made from Sabal domingensis leaves. In the lower right corner is attendee Azra Ajdinovic from Portugal, enjoying a piña colada.

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- (4:07pm) Paul Norris and Jim Glock discuss the finer points of the biennial over a Presidente, or two.

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- (4:39pm) The view from the dinner area, looking south into the hills.

IPS_2005-10-04_16-39-36.jpg

Ryan

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Palmarum

2006 IPS Biennial - DR

Day 5 - Wednesday, October 4th

Casa Bonita Hotel

- (4:55pm) Our host on the left talks with attendees Silvia Bredeson from Hawaii, and Janet Rogers from Florida.

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- (4:57pm) Attendees Lupita & Mike Butler talk about palms from their home in Mexico with Jim Glock.

IPS_2005-10-04_16-57-36.jpg

- (5:37pm) Shortly before dinner was served, the decision was made to 'shoot for' a group photo. (no pun intended) It wasn't organized to any extent, so I kept taking photos as people lined up, moved around, etc. Here is the first of two shots I will post, believing to have gotten as many attendees as I could.

IPS_2005-10-04_17-37-30.jpg

- (5:39pm) The second shot with a slightly different arrangement. It was hard to line up the depth of field properly, so everyone's face would be in focus. I wanted to stand on a chair to do so, but decided not to so close to the pool, which was immediately behind me.

IPS_2005-10-04_17-39-10.jpg

Ryan

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Palmarum

2006 IPS Biennial - DR

Day 5 - Wednesday, October 4th

Casa Bonita Hotel - Hotel Costa Larimar

The dinner at Casa Bonita Hotel was very delicious, it featured many local dishes as well as buffet favorites. We spent about an hour enjoying dinner at the hotel, until we headed home to Hotel Costa Larimar; where there were two presentations scheduled that evening.

- (5:51pm) The excellent buffet that awaited very hungry biennial attendees.

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- (9:13pm) We made our way back onto our respective buses, and journeyed a short distance to our hotel. Everyone disappeared towards their rooms, only to return later in the pool area. A few minutes after many gathered back at the pool, it was announced that presentations were starting upstairs. Here are the two speakers that evening: Franco Simonetti

from Chile, gave a presentation on the distribution of Chilean Wine Palms, Jubaea chilensis throughout the country's provinces. A very detailed presentation on the palms of Cuba, including several newly described species, was provided by Raul Verdecia.

IPS_2005-10-04_21-13-36.jpg

- (10:52pm) I can't close out the day without a photo of the Green Group in action around the pool. Attendees Jayanne Crawley

and forum member Kathryn Ostadal (Kathryn) make Murray Corman laugh about something, I can't quite remember what though. One thing that led to comical observations, was the frequent loss of power during our stay at the Hotel Costa Larimar. Flickering lights, intermittent air conditioning, (going pitch black during a presentation was fun), and the sounds of hotel employees banging the generator around to get it to work. You never know what might happen at a biennial...

IPS_2005-10-04_22-52-06_1.jpg

Ryan

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Palmarum

2006 IPS Biennial - DR

Day 6 - Thursday, October 5th

Hotel Costa Larimar - Pedernales - Sierra de Bahoruco National Park

On the 6th day of the biennial, we traveled west from Barahona to the Sierra de Bahoruco National Park to see many native plants including the elegant Coccothrinax scoparia. In the park, we also took in the sights of the Hoyo de Pelempito, an enormous valley that runs between two mountain ranges. On the way to the park, we stopped along the way to see a stand of Coccothrinax ekmanii. We returned to our hotel in Barahona after visiting the park, to eat dinner and view an incredible local folkloric show.

- (7:53am) Group B (Green), after eating a great breakfast buffet, got onto our bus bound for the Haitian border, or close to it. Some attendees did not to go on this excursion, deciding rather to stay back in Barahona and explore. They found some wonderful beaches, natural springs, and unique treasures only found in Barahona. Always up early and motivated for the day, are biennial veterans Judy & Jim Glock. It was an added experience to share the biennial with them.

IPS_2005-10-05_07-53-16.jpg

- (10:40am) The first leg of this day's trip took about two and a half hours, and many members of Group B (Green) spent that time sleeping off the effects of the previous night. When we arrived at the pit stop on the way to Pedernales, the Group A (Blue) bus was preparing to leave. One member of Group A (Blue), Larry Noblick of the Montgomery Botanical Center

, slipped on the sharp limestone and cut his hand open fairly well. Biennial host and Group B (Green) member Dr. Emilio Martinez flew into action on the steps of our bus and stitched his hand together in no time.

IPS_2005-10-05_10-40-34.jpg

- (10:44am) A striking specimen of Coccothrinax ekmanii near the roadside of route 44, on the way to Pedernales.

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- (10:45) A close-up of the intricate leaf base fibers, with the newly emergent ones bearing a deep bronze color. The petioles have a distinct yellow color that adds even more charm to this awesome palm.

IPS_2005-10-05_10-45-34.jpg

Ryan

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Bilbo

Great pics as usual Ryan!

Those choppers (or rotary wing) sure use a lot of fuel and are not cheap and it was a great privelege and pleasure to gaze apon natural palm forest from altitude.

Regardez all

Jon

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Zac in NC

Ryan- Thanks again for sharing these pics with us.

Zac

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Kris

Dear Folks  :)

the pictures of the biennial were terrefic,

i really felt that i should have been there,

that is when i saw members holding passionately

the Zebra(Pseuodophoenix Eakmanii).

and the picture of a zebra ripped open was bit

painful to me as this baby takes many years to

grow to that height.

and the Buffet lunch was mouth watering !

Terrefic resolution of images never seen before,

they were life like.terrefic job.

the helicopter stills were like stills from saving private

rayan...

Love U Guys,

Kris.

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Palmarum

2006 IPS Biennial - DR

Day 6 - Thursday, October 5th

Hotel Costa Larimar - Pedernales - Sierra de Bahoruco National Park

- (10:48am) South Florida attendee Ron Kiefert stands next to a shorter Coccothrinax ekmanii. The limestone rock we encountered in Jaragua National Park was common throughout this region, and it made walking around tricky. Especially after what we saw it do to Larry Noblick's hand.

IPS_2005-10-05_10-48-24.jpg

- (10:50am) Members of Group B (Green) explore the immediate area along Route 44. From this spot we could see the extreme southwest coastline in the distance. On the left is South Florida attendee Ken St. Germain walking back with Cynthia Andersen from Hawaii. Returning to the bus on the right is attendee Christie Jones, also from South Florida.

IPS_2005-10-05_10-50-08.jpg

- (10:52am) A large group of Coccothrinax ekmanii not far from the edge of the road.

IPS_2005-10-05_10-52-42.jpg

- (11:06am) We began to gather around the bus, awaiting the time to get back on board. We noticed this peculiar Gumbo-limbo (Bursera simaruba) growing in the limestone, not far from where the bus was parked. Its overall size has been greatly reduced due to the harsh conditions, and coastal exposure.

IPS_2005-10-05_11-06-12.jpg

Ryan

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Zac in NC

Wow I love the Bursera. That plant is always neat to see in Tamaulipas. I love the bark. The Coccothrinax is nice as well.

Zac

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Palmarum

2006 IPS Biennial - DR

Day 6 - Thursday, October 5th

Sierra de Bahoruco National Park

One fifty minute drive later, our bus arrived at the entrance to Sierra de Bahoruco National Park. During the trip, we made a right turn at an intersection which was just four miles away from the Haitian border. We disembarked from our bus and boarded our trusty safari vehicles again, for a brief thirty minute ride up into the highest point in the park, at around 1200 meters, 4000 feet. Even at the park entrance it was surprisingly cool, and got even cooler in temperature as we ascended. Along the way in the safari vehicles we saw scattered populations of Coccothrinax scoparia, the trademark palm of the park.

- (12:48pm) Near the center of the park, a clearing served as a unofficial entrance. We disembarked from the safari vehicles and made our way through various trails that worked their way through the mountain top. Here is the entrance sign that greeted us as we got off the safari vehicles.

IPS_2005-10-05_12-48-32.jpg

- (12:49pm) Group B (Green) as we make our way through the park trails. Many of the native plants had large, stone signs that told us plant name, and family. Some plants were surprises to find growing here in the wild. One such surprise was seeing the common Artillery Fern, (Pilea microphylla) growing wild. It spent many years as a landscape plant in South Florida, where it became more of bother than a benefit.

IPS_2005-10-05_12-49-56.jpg

- (12:53pm) A few twists and turns later, we came across the 'piest de resistance' of the park. The Hoyo del Pelempito, an enormous and beautiful valley near the center of the park, awaited us as we reached near the top. It is over eight kilometers across, (five miles) from side to side, and much greater in length. Pure nature as far as the eye can see.

IPS_2005-10-05_12-53-34.jpg

- (12:54pm) Another shot, slightly to the left of above. I simply did not have a wide enough lens to get it all in, 18mm didn't cut it.

IPS_2005-10-05_12-54-46.jpg

Ryan

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Bilbo

Thanks guys for the comradeship and the help when I had problemos on that slope! (Thanks for the Gator Aid and nurses all over me with wet towels etc.

Jack: you have been married only a year and I sure saved you from a fate worse than death (a certain bar which shall be nameless!)

Good luck for the future: you are a nice guy with a great sense of humour.

Regardez

Juan

(I used to sign off to Bob as Juan and will therefore continue to do so)

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elHoagie

(Bilbo @ Oct. 27 2006,10:50)

QUOTE
Jack: you have been married only a year and I sure saved you from a fate worse than death (a certain bar which shall be nameless!)

Good luck for the future: you are a nice guy with a great sense of humour.

Regardez

Juan

(I used to sign off to Bob as Juan and will therefore continue to do so)

Jon - It was great spending time with you at the biennial, even during the dark moments at that certain bar....  I'm trying to convice laHoagie to come to Costa Rica in two years to keep me in line :D

Ryan - As usual the pics are outstanding, keep posting!

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MattyB

Jon, Jack spill the beans!  What happened!?  Did Jack almost go home with a transvestite hooker?  He's known around SoCal for that.

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elHoagie

Wow, this thread is really making me look bad....

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Jeff Searle

Well Jack....there are pictures, Ryan....

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BS Man about Palms

I'm very

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BS Man about Palms

very, very

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BS Man about Palms

sorry to

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BS Man about Palms

do this to

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BS Man about Palms

the bottom of

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BS Man about Palms

page 3 of

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