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Jeff Searle

Madagascar  Expedition  April 05

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Jeff Searle

Bruno,

    Thank-you for your comments, this was a great trip! Thats incredible that your cousin owns the hotel where we always stay. It would be nice if you can talk him into considering planting native palms(only) around his property,especially the hotel. If I may suggest, ask him to look at this PALMTALK FORUM and let him see for himself , all the excitment that these palms from Madagascar are causing. This is the hottest group of palms right now. It would also be nice, to have mature size trees someday where seed can be harvest and take some pressure off of collecting in habitat.

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Jeff Searle

We were not sure on this one. Maybe Dypsis lutea or D. procera. There were no good flowers to make a guess.

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Jeff Searle

Same as above.

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Jeff Searle

Here's another one of those mystery Dypsis. This could be the same ones that we saw up in Marojejy.

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Jeff Searle

Same as above, with a little scale added.

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Jeff Searle

Here is the largest one that I remember seeing in this area. This Dypsis sp. "What the Heck Is It" was not very common to find in this area. It looks alot like these that Bo(BGL) has growing in Hawaii.

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Jeff Searle

This is the only cycad that is native to Madagascar. Cycas thouarsii is primarily a rainforest plant. I only remember seeing less than ten plants and all in one locale. The other thing that stood out about these, that they all were found within several feet of the shore.

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Jeff Searle

Can't  explain.

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Jeff Searle

An upclose look at a Dypsis specie. Bill was almost certain that this was D. procera, which can come in two leaf forms. Split leaf and entire.

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bgl

Jeff,

Great photos! You must have covered a lot of territory! The mystery Dypsis above ("What the Heck is it") may very well be the "Orange Crush". However, I don't believe I've seen any white tomentum on any of mine, and typically the entire crownshaft is orange. There is obviously differences between individuals, and some of mine just have a green crownshaft. No orange at all. But then they don't have any orange further down on the trunk either. The individual above is different in that the lowest part of the trunk is orange, but nothing else is orange. I have not observed this on any of mine.

Bo

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Jeff Searle

Bo,

   Bill Beattie, Peter Balasky and myself hoofed our butts off. In order to get to these unique areas, you have to have a good game plan and some time. For instances, we had to have a full week to be able to cover the Marojejy Mtns.

  As far as these Dpsis species with all this orange, everyone in our group just shrug their shoulders and after starring in awe, just walk away with our heads down. The mysteries live on !

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Gtlevine

(Jeff Searle @ Jun. 28 2006,22:58)

QUOTE
Can't  explain.

Red Clams?

Gary

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bruno

Jeff, I have sent him a while ago, on the first forum, your picture of "his hotel" taken by you.

Can you make a list of what should or could be planted there? I will certainly give it to him and help him buy the palmsI know Alfred has some darianii, so they will surely be there, protected from wind if it is possible.

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elHoagie

(bruno @ Jun. 29 2006,16:54)

QUOTE
Jeff, I have sent him a while ago, on the first forum, your picture of "his hotel" taken by you.

Can you make a list of what should or could be planted there? I will certainly give it to him and help him buy the palmsI know Alfred has some darianii, so they will surely be there, protected from wind if it is possible.

I think the main problem at the Relais du Masoala is going to be the soil.  It looked like pure sand to me...

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Jeff Searle

Gary,

     Very good, RED CLAMS, you know for a second there, you had me staring at those, thinking that could of made for lunch that day. Well, it was interesting seeing two rows of  them.

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Jeff Searle

Dave,

    Thanks, you sound like you know your stuff !

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Jeff Searle

Bruno,

    Good to hear from you again. It's nice that you will take the initiative to get some palms planted at your cousin's hotel. Here is a list of palms that should do very well for you.

  Beccariophoenix madagas.

  Bismarckia nobilis

  Borassus madagas.

  B.  sambariensis

  Dypsis baronii

  D.  cabadae

  D.  crinita

  D.  decaryi

  D.  lastelliana

  D.  linearis

  D.  madagas.

  D.  onilahensis

  D.  carlsmithii

  D.  psammophila

  D.  saintelucei

  Hyphaene  coriacea

These species are found at lower elevations and along some coastlines. Most of these should do very well with the sandy soils, along as he keeps them well watered until they get established.  After awhile, he can start trying some more unusual varieties. Based on my personal account, even Voanioala, the Forest Coconut can grow in alot of sand with regular amounts of water, and tolerate alot of sun at an early age.  I hope to see some of these palms planted on my next visit !  Keep in touch on this...

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bruno

Thank you Jeff I have taken the list. I will get in touch with Christophe now and find out how we can manage bringing those palms to the hotel.

"à bientôt" here then!

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Jeff Searle

We were not sure what this was.

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Jeff Searle

Up close of the flowers. Maybe J D could help with an identification.

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Jeff Searle

This was a massive Orania ravaka. What a nice treat this was to see. There were not too many of these ever in one area. There was some seed that were ripe on the trees.

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Jeff Searle

One more large one.

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Jeff Searle

Here is one of the smaller ones we found.

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Jeff Searle

Some of the group taking a rest. This was a seven hour walk on the trails.

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Jeff Searle

This was a mystery palm. It was a tall, with very pendant leaflets.

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Jeff Searle

Same.

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Jeff Searle

Bill was most sure about this palm being Dypsis pachyramaea. a very small understory palm on the Masoala.

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Jeff Searle

Another shot. There were many of these in this area. Some plants were flowering but really no fruit.

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John Dransfield

Your mystery palm (back 3 photos) is none other than Ravenea dransfieldii!

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John Dransfield

and the last two are not D. pachyramea but D. mocquerysiana

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John Dransfield

and the palm you cal Dypsis beentjei is not. I looked very carefully at this palm last October at Tampolo and we never found flowers. What we did find was that the stems are often paired (evidence of division underground) and that eventually the palm grows up and has divided leaves. At the moment we think it is something related to D. fibrosa and D. dransfieldii. We made scientific collections but in the absence of flowers cannot do much as yet. Our dna sample may give some clues

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Jeff Searle

John, thanks so much for correcting me. I actually had in my notes that we thought the Ravenea was R. dransfieldii and to be safe I listed it as a mystery. On this D. mocquerysiana, well back to on our bellies looking at flowers more closely.

  Well, I am really shocked and surprised to hear that this D. beentjei is not. We were all sure that this was what we were looking at. We also did not find any flowers on both trips to Tampolo. I'm still shaking my head on this one! Sounds like a new species maybe?

   Again, thanks for setting the record straight.

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Dypsisdean

(John Dransfield @ Jul. 06 2006,08:20)

QUOTE
Your mystery palm (back 3 photos) is none other than Ravenea dransfieldii!

Well, that's one ID you could bet the bank on.

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Jeff Searle

A boa that Pete grabbed out of a dead tree trunk.

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summerdaze

Thank you Jeff for all the wonderful pictures and for sharing your expedition with us!     Mike

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Jeff Searle

We were not sure what specie this was. Some of these plants were 25-30' tall. They also were found always where there was alot of standing water and associated with different species of Pandanus.

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Jeff Searle

Another shot. Maybe Dypsis lutea(?)

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Jeff Searle

A very tall Pandanus. Cone shape habit of growth.

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Jeff Searle

We have now left Camp Tampolo and back in Maroantsetra. After a day of much needed rest, we were off again on a small boat to head inland to near a village called Sahavary. As we walked down to where the boat was, we passed this man who was drilling a hole into this pot. Without power tools, you will find a way!!

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JD in the OC

Could that last understory dypsis be Dypsis sp Voly Betamdronga (sp?).  Just google it to see pics.  I have a seedling of it.

JD

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