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bubba

Can you say

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bubba

My Grandad use to always say: August 15- September 15 = Eye of the Tiger time in South Florida. Ironically, the Big MoMo struck here in the early evening hours of Sunday September 16, 1928.

We got two Cape Verde Blows on the screen as we speak. One silly model shows 90L plowing right through South Florida. Atleast one full month of riding the side of your chair stuff. Fasten your seat-belts!

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PalmatierMeg

"Fasten your seat belts. It's going to be a bumpy ride."

Quote courtesy of Bette Davis, All About Eve, 1950 (one of my favorite movies)

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epicure3

Way too early to head to the HD, I would think.

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bubba

Epic, I agree. I am crossing my fingers that "El Nino" lives up to it's hype.We never worried at all about Hurricanes growing up but no satelites and media working the clouds.

Meg, I did not know that the expression came from Bette Davis! I use it from a High School Football announcer at the Muck Bowl(annual Belle Glade/Pahokee football game). Before every kickoff, the colorful announcer announces"fasten your seatbelts" among other colorful statements. It is an event that should not be missed even if you do not have an interest in football.

Did a little reading last night on Florida Hurricanes. Their paths, intensity, time of year and where they develop confirms my Grandad was not too far off. Historically, the "Big Bad Ones" are born as fronts off Africa that organize over the Cape Verde Islands. The most notable of the Cape Verde's with recent effects on Florida were Miami/Sept/1926, Palm Beach/Okeechobee/Sept/1928, Keys/Sept/1935, Ft.Laud/Aug/1947,Palm Beach/Aug/1949 and Homestead/Andrew/Aug/1992. Of these, only the Keys Labor Day Storm of 1935 rated as a 5. I know the 1935 Blow was insane(supposedly sustained winds as high as 250 MPH) but find it hard to believe that Andrew, 1926 and 1928 were not 5's.

As it relates to wind speeds, the Jupiter Lighthouse clocked sustained winds for 10 minutes at 153 MPH in the 1949 storm. Interestingly, in the 1928 storm, the Jupiter Lighthouse lost it's wind instument but wind gusts actually moved the structure of the Jupiter Lighthouse 11 inches off it's foundation. Anyone who has seen the Jupiter Lighthouse knows that a wind that moved that structure off it's foundation had to be monolithical.

Cape Verde's that effect Florida are with limited exceptions experienced from Mid August to Mid September. Florida has actually been very lucky with Cape Verdes because numerous major Cape Verdes have actually skated the East Coast, following the Gulfstream with limited effects on Florida.(I counted 10 with this path since the 1700's) I remember David in 1979 that was gigantic but only gave us winds of 80 MPH as only it's West Quadrant brushed us as it headed up the Stream.

In October, the game changes in Florida to "Sidewinders". These Hurricanes originate in the lower and Western Carribean and many times are haunting Category 5's deep in the Carribean. When they effect Florida, they generally move from West to East across Florida. They are fortunately much weaker than Cape Verdes or what is experienced deep in the Carribean but certainly can be very destructive. Hurricane Wilma in 2005 was a sidewinder that rocked our world but good in 2005.

The worst Cape Verde year was actually 1780 although none of these Storms effected Florida. In fact, it may have been the worst Hurricane year ever. Three Cape Verdes from August to October had devastating effects throughout the Carribean. The last in October was the big Monster MoMo. It turned the Barbadoes into a defoliated rock. Beyond that, during the middle of the storm a rare earthquake took place. A General in the British Navy emerged from his underground bunker and wrote to the King of England that it was time to pack it up. The formidable British Navy was decimated by this series of Storms and that certainly helped the cause of the brand new USA!

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Dave-Vero

National Weather Service hurricane climatology

The Cape Verde storms tend to be early-season. The three great Everglades-area storms of the past century (1935 labor day, 1960 Donna, 1992 Andrew) were early. But the region is also subject to late-season storms originating south of Cuba.

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bubba

Dave, I didn't mention Donna, which was another very wicked Cape Verde, that went North through the Keys and entered the Mainland around the area of Cape Romano/Everglades City in September of 1960. It gutted the State going right through the middle before creating major problems in the Northeast US.

Southeast Florida was probably the least effected in the State. I do remember that the flooding and devastation was so bad in Everglades City that the former County seat was moved to Naples for Collier County.

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