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Logolight

Getting the boots off the trunk

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Logolight

Any ideas on how to clean the boots off?  I'm afraid of damaging the trunk.

Thanks.

Dave

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MattyB

What species?

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Dave Butler

Depends on what you stepped in

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F Zipperbaum

I don't any trouble except with the bottles...anyone know how to clean those?

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BobbyinNY

I took some of the boot off my queen. Some of it came off pretty easily, but some of it is still pretty tight.

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MattyB

I take a carpet/utility knife and cut the leaf bases off of crownshafted palms (ie. Royals) that hang on for a long time and look unsightly.  I do it very carfully as not to actually cut into the trunk at all.  You're actually leaving the base fully connected but just giving it a real short hair cut.  No ripping!

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Jeff Searle

With bottle palms, I like to use a sharpe pair of clippers. Starting at the bottom, you just start cutting along the base of the old leaf sheath. Work your way around one at a time. You eventually work up the palm.

  On other palms with a crownshaft, where the leaf starts splitting down, continue with a sharpe knife or clippers and cut very carefully down to the bottom of the leaf base. Then run your knife in a circle around the trunk, the leaf should then come off pretty easy. be careful not to cut too deeply into the trunk.

  Jeff

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Walter John

(Jeff Searle @ Nov. 16 2006,11:30)

QUOTE
With bottle palms, I like to use a sharpe pair of clippers. Starting at the bottom, you just start cutting along the base of the old leaf sheath. Work your way around one at a time. You eventually work up the palm.

  On other palms with a crownshaft, where the leaf starts splitting down, continue with a sharpe knife or clippers and cut very carefully down to the bottom of the leaf base. Then run your knife in a circle around the trunk, the leaf should then come off pretty easy. be careful not to cut too deeply into the trunk.

  Jeff

I've found Bottle palms the toughest of the lot Jeff. They certainly hug the crownshaft tight for a long time. Spindles are a little easier though.

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Jeff Searle

(Wal @ Nov. 15 2006,22:15)

QUOTE

(Jeff Searle @ Nov. 16 2006,11:30)

QUOTE
With bottle palms, I like to use a sharpe pair of clippers. Starting at the bottom, you just start cutting along the base of the old leaf sheath. Work your way around one at a time. You eventually work up the palm.

  On other palms with a crownshaft, where the leaf starts splitting down, continue with a sharpe knife or clippers and cut very carefully down to the bottom of the leaf base. Then run your knife in a circle around the trunk, the leaf should then come off pretty easy. be careful not to cut too deeply into the trunk.

  Jeff

I've found Bottle palms the toughest of the lot Jeff. They certainly hug the crownshaft tight for a long time. Spindles are a little easier though.

Wal,

      Your absolutely right. It can take a long time to clean one bottle. Maybe 20 minutes or more. But, oh how nice it will look after.

  Jeff

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Don Little

What is the best and safest way for the palm and of course myself to take off the old leaf bases on the queens?  I like to leave a few on but if you wait untill they easily come off then you have 10 to 15 feet of old bases which is to much for my taste.

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F Zipperbaum

I use a chain saw with a short blade... I cut going up as to not get to close to the trunk.  After I am done, I then get a hoe and put in on top of the oldest boot and pull down...You will get to point where they won't come off so I repeat in about 3 weeks and it seems to get most of them.

I'm sure there is an easier way.  I just haven't found it yet.

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Logolight

(MattyB @ Nov. 15 2006,14:20)

QUOTE
What species?

It's a Sable palm.

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DoomsDave

Usually, I just let nature take its course.  With the number of palms at my place, if I cleaned all of them, it would be like nursing 2 sets of quintuplets -- there'd be no time for anything else.

That said, when I feel I must remove a boot from a trunk, I do as MattyB does, and take a short-bladed utility knife and VERY carefully cut it away.  Sometimes, they're tough [oedipi] and I'll use a fine-bladed saw.

Just go slow and careful, and you'll be fine.

Post some pictures!

We love to see success!

dave

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MattyB

I don't know about Sabal, but I think they're like Washingtonias and you can use a utility knife to cut the split leaf base away from the trunk.  This is how I've seen Washys cleaned out here in Californeyeai!

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Central Floridave

Remember to never cut off a green frond.  Unless of course the frond is looking ugly and in a walking path and the wife demands that you cut it.  I resist all temptation to cut a green frond for aesthetic reason due to the elements get sucked back into the trunk as the frond desicates.    Also, if you cut off a green frond that is one less food producing leaf for the plant. Also, there is a chance the cut frond will send out an aroma that attracts the palm weevil.  

I like a full body palm, but of course remove the brown fronds (if I can reach them).   Also, use the frond in the compost bin and recycle it back into the yard.

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Jerry@TreeZoo

The bottles are tough but get easier as the trunk ages and swells.  Once you do it the first time to a specimen (following Jeff Searle's advice), the following times are a breeze.  After I remove the boots, there is a good bit of fiber still hanging on.  You can rub most of that off with leather gloves.

With Sabals, the commercial guys shave the trunk with chain saws.  If you've only got one, use a good pair of sharp Felcos.   Sabals in wet, humid Florida eventually drop all their boots, but this is after many years.

Jerry

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Logolight

I'll try the utility knife.  I just hope that no palmeto bugs jump out at me. :P

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Kris

Dear Guys  :)

I use well sharpened kitchen knife and one

rambo knife & all my work is done using these

tools and a latter to trim my date palms and all

my plants.

and guys if you have stills of u triming your palms

that would be of use to members who are reading

your notes..

some stills of palm triming_

post-108-1163861429_thumb.jpg

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Kris

indian bottle palm still with all old boots

removed_

post-108-1163861710_thumb.jpg

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