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Keith in SoJax

Is this Livistona chinensis or australis

Is this Livistona chinensis or australis  

16 members have voted

  1. 1. Livistona chinensis, australis, or something else

    • chinensis
      15
    • australis
      1
    • something else
      0


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Keith in SoJax

I've always assume it was L. chinensis, but it was badly burned by temps in the low-mid 20's with frost. The new fronds look good and it's loaded with fruit/seed right now so it's in full recovery mode but it's still pretty ugly. For comparison purposes, a smaller L. chinensis nearby had much less damage as did Acoelorraphe wrightii. Phoenix roebellenii right next to this Livistona was 75% defoliated. I just thought L. chinensis was hardier than this particular plant seems to be.

post-192-1247874850_thumb.jpg

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Keith in SoJax

Sorry, forgot to hit the upload button. Here's the photo!

post-192-1247874784_thumb.jpg

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FRITO

Thats looks to be a chinensis. this year was cold for us in north florida. there are specimens around town that look similar to your picture as far as cold damage goes. The more exposed they are the more damage they recieved.

its the leaf tips that burn first on this species and with so many droopy leaflets very mild damage can make a large mature specimen look quite "ratty."

they reliably take to about 20 degrees for a low with moderate damage. this is a cool palm for oak understory and wouldnt plant a palm fully exposed in north florida. might as well do Sabals or other hardier Livistona for that requirment.

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Walter John

australis would have taken the cold better

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Alicehunter2000

I agree with Frito. Exposed L. chinesis do poorly in the open, makes a great understory palm for oak trees, pine trees or any other large N. Fl. tree that keeps its winter leaves.

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sonoranfans
I've always assume it was L. chinensis, but it was badly burned by temps in the low-mid 20's with frost. The new fronds look good and it's loaded with fruit/seed right now so it's in full recovery mode but it's still pretty ugly. For comparison purposes, a smaller L. chinensis nearby had much less damage as did Acoelorraphe wrightii. Phoenix roebellenii right next to this Livistona was 75% defoliated. I just thought L. chinensis was hardier than this particular plant seems to be.

The supple nature of the leaflet tips(smoothy curved) says chinensis to me, looks just like mine. The austrailis I've seen here dont weep as smoothly, they are more "floppy".

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Eric in Orlando

L. australis is also usually a darker green color, not the dull green like L. chinensis

Here is a good lineup of 3 Livistona, from left to right is L. chinensis, L. australis, L. decora

102_0140.jpg

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Kris

Dear Eric :)

Nice still with 3 Livistona varieties together !

Love,

Kris :)

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Keith in SoJax

Thanks everyone. I had always thought chinensis and we have consensus. I'll have to try australis too. I like Livistonas, though L. chinensis sure isn't among my favorites.

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edbrown_III

Mine got burned here in Jax also probably as mcuh from the drought as the cold. Its generally older leaves that have been on the tree for a few years.

Australis got burned as well but under canophy--- I lost the one australis I had in 89 but all the L. chinensis survived so it is definetly more bud hardy than L. australis

Best regards,

Ed

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Keith in SoJax

Ed, I find your experiences with Livistona and other palms through the 1980s here in Jacksonville extremely valuable. Thanks for your comments. My L. chinensis stands in a very wet site (think swamp!). It seems to thrive on the water, but I wonder if it's more vulnerable to freeze damage when it's living with wet feet. Making things worse, I think the cold air drains down the NE roof slope right onto the L. chinensis. Thus it's in a wet spot in one of the coldest sites I have. Probably should have planted S. palmetto there instead. Oh well, too big to move now (in the practical sense). I would like to aquire a big L. australis one of these days. I just don't have the space for small plant to spread out any more. It needs a decent trunk to get it up and out of the way. Hope all is well up your way. I've had more rain than I know what do with down here in Mandarin. I swear we're getting 4-6 inches every week (and I'm only exaggerating a little bit!).

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Walter John
Mine got burned here in Jax also probably as mcuh from the drought as the cold. Its generally older leaves that have been on the tree for a few years.

Australis got burned as well but under canophy--- I lost the one australis I had in 89 but all the L. chinensis survived so it is definetly more bud hardy than L. australis

Best regards,

Ed

If australis got burned under canopy, it must have been antartic like.

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Keith in SoJax

Wal, thats when a real arctic blast penetrated the whole penninsula of FL. The record low at the local airport was -14C. In the neighborhood where Ed and I live, it was more like -12C, but still quite challenging for virtually all palm species (except for our local natives). Here in North America our landmass is connected to the Arctic so we don't have the benefit of water to modify the air when it decides to flow southward. This makes us vulnerable to the occasional horrendous freeze event. Are there palms in the areas of Australia that get that cold? If so, I'd like to try growing them.

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Walter John
Are there palms in the areas of Australia that get that cold? If so, I'd like to try growing them

Nothing at all Keith, it doesn't get that cold here unless you're lost up in the snowy mountains in winter at night without a Saint Bernard. This is a sunburnt country not a frostbitten one.

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Daryl

Keith, L.nitida grows near Injune, which has recorded -8C in town. It is possible it has experienced lower temperatures than that, although our cold events are wimpy compared to nth America.

Daryl

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Keith in SoJax

I didn't think cold temps like our arctic outbreaks occurred in Australia except at high elevation. Wal, you confirmed that. Daryl, I have what I believe is L. nitida and indeed it came through last winter without incident. It's at least an urban legend that L. nitida is the hardiest species of Livistona. It has endured winter freezes in Savannah GA 145 miles (200km) north of me with little more than some cosmetic damage to old fronds. It's also supposed to grow quickly which would be nice. L. decora is the pace setter here in my yard so it'll have to grow real fast to keep up with them. L. decora also seems quite content enduring frosty freezes without complaint.

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Surf Guy

Here is a couple of pix of my seedling in So Cal. It gets about an hour of sun all day and is in full shade all winter. I am trying to get it to stretch.

DSC05118.jpg

DSC05053.jpg

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