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Zeeth

Florida sea grape

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Zeeth

I've seen some wonderful sea grape trees at the beach and a friends house. I don't really like the hedge look, but I love the look of them when they are pruned into a tree. They give such great shade and are great climbing tree. Anyone else like this look?

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epicure3

Don't even get me started....my favorite tree to be sure.

What I have discovered is that the Coccoloba Uvifera tends to be a sprawling shrub near the ocean and more of a tree inland in Z10. I have 2 that are of the sprawling shrub nature, more than likely due to our California climate. However, they are starting to form a semblence of a trunk, which is not a good sign based on where they are planted. If you search this site, you will find a few pictures of some giant seagrapes (as trees) in Central Fla.

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Dave-Vero

On the Florida Atlantic coast, they are strictly a beach species, and historically, they were regularly burned in lightning-set fires. The dune vegetation was surprisingly flammable. The South side of Sebastian Inlet, site of several prescribed burns, gives an idea of how things once looked.

Sea grapes are also vulnerable to bad freezes.

In cultivation, one look is to trim them as a fairly low hedge while allowing some stems to grow up then branch out. You get a layer-cake look. The Silver Pavillon in Kyoto has a giant hedge something like that.

post-275-1247720228_thumb.jpg

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epicure3

Those hedges really don't look like Seagrape, do they? I would also doubt that they would survive in Kyoto, unless they are indoors?

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Eric in Orlando

Its one of my favorites. Its so exotic looking, nothing beats a large, open tree sized specimen.

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rozpalm

Dave, I know what you are talking about. I see hedges in the more upscale areas around town grown like the ones your picture. Its an interesting look.

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bubba

This is the way Zeeth and Epic like them:

Picture418.jpg

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bubba

And to show a little wood:

Picture417.jpg

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fastfeat
Those hedges really don't look like Seagrape, do they? I would also doubt that they would survive in Kyoto, unless they are indoors?

My thought as well. I think those might be a Ligustrum or Viburnum species.

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Zeeth
This is the way Zeeth and Epic like them:

Picture418.jpg

Yup! How old do they have to be (approximately) before they start to look like a tree, as opposed to a shrub.

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epicure3
And to show a little wood:

Picture417.jpg

That's what I'm talkin' about. Suh-weet.

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epicure3
Yup! How old do they have to be (approximately) before they start to look like a tree, as opposed to a shrub.

I don't know but I can tell yoou that if you prune the largest branches while young, it will probably not develop into a tree.

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Big Tex
I've seen some wonderful sea grape trees at the beach and a friends house. I don't really like the hedge look, but I love the look of them when they are pruned into a tree. They give such great shade and are great climbing tree. Anyone else like this look?

We love them. Brought some seeds back from Miami and planted them about 3 years ago and I have a nice 6 foot Sea Grape in a pot. Don't know if it will make it hear but I may plant it a try in a year or so.

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epicure3
We love them. Brought some seeds back from Miami and planted them about 3 years ago and I have a nice 6 foot Sea Grape in a pot. Don't know if it will make it hear but I may plant it a try in a year or so.

They don't like frosts or freezes but grow back extremely quickly in the spring if damaged. I don't know if you would get a large tree out of a damaged, young plant. Interesting question.

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Dave-Vero

In Florida, sea grapes are native only about as far north as Daytona Beach. They would likely persist as 'perennials' with a bit of care farther north.

I need to take a photo of a two-layer sea grape in a local beach park. Because sea grapes grow rather fast and are well-adapted to recovery from damage, they survive severe pruning quite well, whether it's occasional whackings or incessant poodling.

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Zeeth

They had 3 gallon ones today at Wally world for $4.50. I picked up the most tree like specimen, has some nice gray wood with good character. I'm wondering where to plant it to give it full tree potential, I'm thinking in the front yard in the mulch bed close to the street. I'll put up pics after I plant it.

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Big Tex
They don't like frosts or freezes but grow back extremely quickly in the spring if damaged. I don't know if you would get a large tree out of a damaged, young plant. Interesting question.

I talked to a guy in the SE part of Houston that say he has one in his yard that is a few years old. He says it has done well. We get slightly colder here in the NW part of Houston. Gives me hope anyway.

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