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bubba

California v Arizona v Texas

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bubba

Cruising around on Weather Underground and checking some of the Hotter locations. Where is it hotter? I checked a site in Death Valley that topped out a few days ago at 117.3F with a low of about 90F.

Yuma checked in with a high around 109F and a low near 90F but the humidity levels were substantially higher. Specifically, California humidity was generally at it's highest around 20%. As it moved towards the High temperature, the humidity dropped to around 10%. In Yuma, the humidity was around 40% but moved down to around 23% at 109F.

Checked out a little place in Texas called Hearne. It had a High of 110F on July 2,2009. However, the humidity was around 50% but dipped to 30% when it hit 110F.

In contrast, the High/Low at PBI yesterday was 91/74F. The humidity at 91F was 52%.

Where is it hotter combining Heat and Humidity and is there a certain point where it just does not matter?

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Cristóbal

I can say this about summer in the hot desert - it is most dry and humiditey most low in the west part of sonora desert, and most humid in the east part. East and north of the sea of cortez it is more humid and theres rain in summer for 2 reasons - more close to the gulf of mexico and also for the winds in the summer go from southwest to northeast and take the humiditey of the hot sea of cortez in this way, to northeast to arizona, new mexico, sonora state. theres more vegetations in these areas of the sonora desert then in east california and baja california.

It is for this reason theres no cactus saguaro in baja california and in east california - this cactus needs some rain in the summer, the first saguaro you see in west arizona and west sonora, northeast of the sea of cortez.

The most dryest weather station in north america is bataques, by mexicali, capital of baja california, i am very sure other areas of baja california and east california are more dryer but theres no weather stations not many people live in these areas.

I go for the work very often every month to this area of baja california mexicali and san felipe and east to san luis sonora it is some horrible place to live it is like you go to hell.

Edited by Cristóbal

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epicure3

If you're asking where does it "feel" hotter? In my opinion, it feels hotter when you have the 90s + the high humidity. However, once you get to about 110F (which I often encounter in Palm Springs), it just doesn't matter any more. Both are a little different but very uncomfortable. I can handle being outside in the 110F a little longer than the 91F + 50%+ humidity.

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Cristóbal

bubba, i find this for you:

post-285-1246726903_thumb.jpg

Heat Index - Heat & Humidity Factors

Extreme Danger 130°F or higher

(54°C or higher) Heat stroke or sunstroke likely.

Danger 105 - 129°F

(41 - 54°C) Sunstroke, muscle cramps, and/or heat exhaustion likely. Heatstroke possible with prolonged exposure and/or physical activity.

Extreme Caution 90 - 105°F

(32 - 41°C) Sunstroke, muscle cramps, and/or heat exhaustion possible with prolonged exposure and/or physical activity.

Caution 80 - 90°F

(27 - 32°C) Fatigue possible with prolonged exposure and/or physical activity.

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bubba

Cristobal, Thank you for the Heat/Humidity Summary. Unfortunately, it does not go below 40% Humidity. It seems most of the High temperatures in the Desert occur at very low humidity(circa 10%).My first experience with Desert heat took place in the Summer when I was 14. My Dad had taken me to a great Golf Tournament in San Diego for Junior Golfers and we were traveling back to Phoenix. We stopped in Palm Springs and the Mission Hills Course had just opened.

We got out to the course around 10:30 AM and it looked like they had closed it down. They said to expect 115 F. They hustled up a couple of Bag Boys because they thought we would be dead ducks. To me, it felt very comfortable and I did not have to deal with incessant perspiration. Beyond that, the ball definitely traveled further with the lack of Humidity and Heat. I played a great round, it was 115F and felt more comfortable than 90F in Florida.

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sonoranfans
I can say this about summer in the hot desert - it is most dry and humiditey most low in the west part of sonora desert, and most humid in the east part. East and north of the sea of cortez it is more humid and theres rain in summer for 2 reasons - more close to the gulf of mexico and also for the winds in the summer go from southwest to northeast and take the humiditey of the hot sea of cortez in this way, to northeast to arizona, new mexico, sonora state. theres more vegetations in these areas of the sonora desert then in east california and baja california.

It is for this reason theres no cactus saguaro in baja california and in east california - this cactus needs some rain in the summer, the first saguaro you see in west arizona and west sonora, northeast of the sea of cortez.

The most dryest weather station in north america is bataques, by mexicali, capital of baja california, i am very sure other areas of baja california and east california are more dryer but theres no weather stations not many people live in these areas.

I go for the work very often every month to this area of baja california mexicali and san felipe and east to san luis sonora it is some horrible place to live it is like you go to hell.

This is an accurate assessment if you look at todays weather in arizona. At my local weather station 109F was the high, some in the center of the concrete heat island(less trees, more pavement) were up to 113F. It was very dry(dew point 45F) in phoenix so I wet some palms down. In the dry desert a little water really cools things off, up to 20 F temporarily. Meanwhile, southeast of us in tuscon it was 103F, and in nogales it was 97F. Tuscon and nogales are getting some moisture, even if it doesnt hit the ground, it cools things down. Often in the summer here, precipitation evaporates before it hits the ground cooling the atmosphere. We in the phoenix area appear to have an extended forecast of 109-115F over the next week, the sun is very hot, too hot to not be in shade. Breathing is not difficult the way it is back east when its hot as long as you are in the shade, but there is a sense of being housebound in the afternoons, I'd rather be inside when it gets that hot. Even though the high was 109F at about 3PM AST(arizona standard time), I woke this morning @ 6:30AM to 78F and dry, just wonderful for breakfast outside. By 11AM it was 100F, not so wonderful, but better than 85F with 90%humidity perhaps. When the humidity goes up in the monsoon season(dewpoints >=55F), the nightime lows will be in the mid to high 80's and even the low 90's at times. At that time, it is difficult to enjoy being outside for very long at any time as the temps may still be 105-107F and its humid as well. The saguaro cactus doesnt like the lower (1000' elevation) sonoran desert without irrigation, it doesnt grow naturally here. But as soon as the altitude hits 2000' they are quite prolific, growing wild everywhere. The higher altitudes tend to be cooler and less water is needed, but they also tend to get more rain at those higher altitudes. They grow all over in tuscon, but also north and northeast of phoenix where the elevation rises quickly.

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sonoranfans
Cristobal, Thank you for the Heat/Humidity Summary. Unfortunately, it does not go below 40% Humidity. It seems most of the High temperatures in the Desert occur at very low humidity(circa 10%).My first experience with Desert heat took place in the Summer when I was 14. My Dad had taken me to a great Golf Tournament in San Diego for Junior Golfers and we were traveling back to Phoenix. We stopped in Palm Springs and the Mission Hills Course had just opened.

We got out to the course around 10:30 AM and it looked like they had closed it down. They said to expect 115 F. They hustled up a couple of Bag Boys because they thought we would be dead ducks. To me, it felt very comfortable and I did not have to deal with incessant perspiration. Beyond that, the ball definitely traveled further with the lack of Humidity and Heat. I played a great round, it was 115F and felt more comfortable than 90F in Florida.

115F in direct sun in the desert is too hot to play golf Bubba, you are pretty tough. Shade helps, but 115 F is just too hot to be comfortable with any physical activity. You were likely sweating up a storm, it was just evaporating before it accumulated so you didnt notice it. that rapid evaporation keeps you cool, its the bodys air conditioner for the blood. People that are not from the desert dont understand that they lose water so fast that they must double their drinking or face dehydration. Two years ago a young married couple tried to hike alocal trail 1.5 mi each way and died of dehydration before they could reach their car. They didnt carry water with them, its sad. For a hike like that in summer, you need 1 gallon each. 8-10 16 oz glasses of water a day is recommended in the hot/dry heat and non diet soda just makes the dehydration worse. After living in this desert for 10+ years, I can say I dont miss the humidity of back east, but I can also say that I dont sit in direct sun on a hot afternoon, and I certainly dont work under it. That would be a recipe for heat stroke as the sun is hotter here since so little water is in the atmosphere to scatter the light and lessen the suns intensity. People who work outside tend to start work at 5:30-6AM and are done for the day at 1:30-2PM. And the last 2 hours in their day are not highly productive.

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bubba

Tom, We had plenty of water,were in a golf cart that had a roof and fans. Beyond that, I was 14, used to carrying my bag and playing all day long in very hot /humid Florida. My Dad was in very good shape, a runner and also quite used to Florida heat and humidity.

I did not say it was not hot. It was. But in most respects, it was more tolerable than 95F at 60% humidity. Plus for me a golf cart was a luxury.

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sonoranfans
Tom, We had plenty of water,were in a golf cart that had a roof and fans. Beyond that, I was 14, used to carrying my bag and playing all day long in very hot /humid Florida. My Dad was in very good shape, a runner and also quite used to Florida heat and humidity.

I did not say it was not hot. It was. But in most respects, it was more tolerable than 95F at 60% humidity. Plus for me a golf cart was a luxury.

That certainly clarifies things bubba. As long as you have shade and a little breeze perhaps, the evaporation from the skin is so fast that you often wont even realize you are sweating, but your body is very effectively cooling itself. If you have water and shade, the arizona desert is mostly more comfortable than florida in summer. There are times when the weather is also more comfortable than Hawaii, perhaps 2-3 months a year. In lots of public places(Zoo), restaurants, etc, they use misters outdoors to really cool things off. I remember my first visit on a job interview here, it was 108F and felt very hot, especially in a jacket and tie. We went to a restaurant and sat outside with all these misters running around the patio, it was very comfortable. I was shocked by the ability of water to cool off the air so much. Another example was last year I coming back from a trip, flying into phoenix at 109F ambient. I got in the car and started driving and a storm cell came over the area and it started raining. Twenty minutes after the rain started, the temperature sensor on my car read 79F, a 30 degree drop in 20 minutes! At 79F, I just rolled the windows down and enjoyed the fresh air that the rain brought. When your body adapts to the arizona climate, it is not too hard to take. For 10 months a year, I like it better than the east. When it is dry, you can set your AC higher as well and be comfortable. I have lately set my ac to about 85-86F and sleep very well. When the humidity hits, I will lower it to 80-81F or I will not be able to sleep well.

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happ

Though not desert, the Central valley has similar conditions. Spent several days in Chico\ north Sacramento valley recently & couldn't handle the heat well. I forgot that the maximum occurs around 5-6pm & evening heat is uncomfortable. They live on the "9 to 9" schedule: do everything between 9PM & 9AM if it involves being outside. In LA is starts to cool down around 3-4PM due to coastal breeze.

Mexicali often experiences the highest dew points but as Cristóbal points out, the California desert averages less than 40% annual rainfall during summer. High humidity & no rain can be unbearable.

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sonoranfans

Well we hit the annual high today minutes ago(5:30PM AST) at the weather station 1 mile away its 111.3F. 5 miles away in rancho del verde its 114F, high for the area. NOte how the dew point plunged and the temps shot up from 7:30 to 9:30 AM the dew went from 56F to 39F.

http://www.wunderground.com/weatherstation...sp?ID=KAZGILBE3

Yeah its very dry out there(RH 9%), and that means high temps this time of year. When its at or over 110F, the dry hot is just plain hot. MOre of the same is expected over the next 5 days 110-112F. Im going hiking in the high country saturday, I just have to get away from the heat for awhile. The good thing is that in 1 1/2 hours, some 90 miles away at 5000' elevation it will be 90F for a high and 15% humidity. The morning should be glorious. Here is the current weather in payson

91F high/15% RH, my kind of weather, with an overnight low of 60F.

http://www.wunderground.com/cgi-bin/findwe...uSelect=WEATHER

This is why I like being out west near the mountains, 90 minute drive and everything changes

ANd if thats not cool enough a 3 hr drive to williams drops it to 81 F for a high at 6680 ft elevation.

http://www.wunderground.com/weatherstation...y.asp?ID=MWHLA3

They say that 1500 ft elevation is like 900 miles of latitude. Given this, I can get an equivalent change in the weather of over 3000 miles of latitude just by driving 3 hours to the high country. It kind of takes the "trapped in the heat feeling away" if your willing to take a a few hour drive. Too bad I cant take my palms with me, my sabal minor sure looks like it could use a break.

Edited by sonoranfans

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yachtingone

The hottest place in the planet is Kevien Weavers green house in Lake Elsinor!!!!!

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sonoranfans
The hottest place in the planet is Kevien Weavers green house in Lake Elsinor!!!!!

But you can always step out of the greenhouse and escape. According to nexus, phoenix is the hottest city in the USA

http://www.currentresults.com/Weather-Extr...test-cities.php

Phoenix averages 169 days a year above 89F, and tuscon is second with 144 days and vegas 3rd with 133 days.

The weather station 1 mile away says the monthly average temp has been 97F, with a high of 115F yesterday

July high avg low

1st 104 92 83

2nd 104 91 79

3rd 94 87 83

5 109 101 91

6 109 95 78

7 108 97 82

8 108 97 84

9 111 96 81

10 113 98 81

11 113 98 82

12 111 98 86

13 113 98 82

14 114 100 83

15 107 103 91

16 111 98 83

17 114 100 88

18 115 98 84

that makes 9 of the last 10 days above 110F for a high.

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