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Chambeyronia lepidota

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Tyrone

Just looked back at my pic from 14 Jun 2010 and on average mine have grown a spear or maybe a leaf in 1 year. That's slow. Must be the average temps through the year being a tad high. Compare that to my Dwarf Malay coconut which has put out 5 leaves in the same time, and I'm beginning to wonder which one is the real challenge. The ones that died must have just totally stopped during summer and couldn't start up again. I'm not giving up though.

Best regards

Tyrone

Tyrone,your seedlings look great... obviously a reflection of the attention they recieve and if they(new cal palms) wern`t such a challenge to grow some of the mystique would be lost i feel.Never ever give up...Craig.

Thanks mate.

While they're young I may need to set something up like the professional Cymbidium orchid growers have. Cymbidiums don't like high temps but like cool humid conditions. They use fans and big blocks of porous material on the walls of their houses which have water dripping down them (like a Coolgardie safe). The result is constantly gentle moving air and temps about 10C cooler than outside in summer and very humid.

Hopefully when these get older they'll get easier.

Best regards

Tyrone

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Big50

Very nice plants, & great detail on the images. Thanks for sharing those. How old are they?

Hi my friend,I'm glad you like,i received my seeds in 29-09-2008,Tyrone seeds of the same lot.

Tyrone your lepidotas are very well they look very healthy,the difference I see is that yours have been pretty sheltered ,mine are quite exposed, 50% shade, sometimes exposed to strong winds and rain,but here we have fairly cool temperatures,I very much like the changes it intends to.

I noticed that in the last leaves have opened a little red.

Regards.

Edited by Big50

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BS Man about Palms

So, its been a while since I posted mine... shame on me. I neglected them a bit and the smaller one (which was last to move into the greenhouse) got too dry from me... (typical) and did not make it. The bigger one on the other hand did take some time to acclimate as Matt had predicted. And as the soil seemed to always be plenty damp, even though on the cool floor, I made a concious effort to not water for a while. I recently noted it was drying out some and thus growing, and I have decided to move outside...

Anyway, my surviving one of the 2 I originally recieved.

post-27-095311400 1308002874_thumb.jpg post-27-011308000 1308002915_thumb.jpg

It definately has gotten more "bulky" so, heres hoping its starts to grow a little easier..

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BS Man about Palms

On the other hand I recently picked up some mid-altitude ones that a local grower had germinated early on and the date was when they were potted from a baggie. Pretty easy to see the seedling differences. He also had High level ones too which I got, but this is a big mid -level so I thought I would show it. Ultimately I'm guessing the high level one will be easier to grow in So Cal....

post-27-018888800 1308003467_thumb.jpg post-27-018886400 1308003515_thumb.jpg

Yep, thats me, a fine photographer.. :P

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Tyrone

Very nice plants, & great detail on the images. Thanks for sharing those. How old are they?

Hi my friend,I'm glad you like,i received my seeds in 29-09-2008,Tyrone seeds of the same lot.

Tyrone your lepidotas are very well they look very healthy,the difference I see is that yours have been pretty sheltered ,mine are quite exposed, 50% shade, sometimes exposed to strong winds and rain,but here we have fairly cool temperatures,I very much like the changes it intends to.

I noticed that in the last leaves have opened a little red.

Regards.

Thanks Roberto. Your ones are tremendous. :D I didn't know they eventually open red leaves like C mac. Do you know what minerals are in your volcanic rock?

I'll keep everyone posted as to how my ones go in the next year. Even though my shadehouse has been set up to be cooler in summer so my NC palms have a better life, I don't think it was staying cool enough in there. We had around 3 months this summer where the temp averaged 31-33C, and quite a few days in the 35-40C bracket with warm nights in the mid the high twenties. It was always very humid in their and the temp never got above 33C all summer. If I can keep air movement going and the temp in the 20's through summer ( a big ask) then I may end up with some good growth. It must have got too hot in there as one of my 4 Dictyocaryum lamarckianum has just died. The other 3 look fine. On the other hand my Kentiopsis olivaformis, Veillonia alba, K magnifica, K pyriformis and B hapala look great.

Best regards

Tyrone

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Tassie_Troy1971

Just looked back at my pic from 14 Jun 2010 and on average mine have grown a spear or maybe a leaf in 1 year. That's slow. Must be the average temps through the year being a tad high. Compare that to my Dwarf Malay coconut which has put out 5 leaves in the same time, and I'm beginning to wonder which one is the real challenge. The ones that died must have just totally stopped during summer and couldn't start up again. I'm not giving up though.

Best regards

Tyrone

Thats Interesting Tyrone my little lepidota has grown a full spear in 4 months. This seems like a palm that has similar requirements to Lepidorachis moreana cool nights all year and no great extremes of temperature plus high humidity - coastal Tasmania . Colin showed me one in a specially equipped greenhouse at RSBG that was kept at a cloudforest temperature with constant misting and it was doing really well .

Troy

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Tyrone

Just looked back at my pic from 14 Jun 2010 and on average mine have grown a spear or maybe a leaf in 1 year. That's slow. Must be the average temps through the year being a tad high. Compare that to my Dwarf Malay coconut which has put out 5 leaves in the same time, and I'm beginning to wonder which one is the real challenge. The ones that died must have just totally stopped during summer and couldn't start up again. I'm not giving up though.

Best regards

Tyrone

Thats Interesting Tyrone my little lepidota has grown a full spear in 4 months. This seems like a palm that has similar requirements to Lepidorachis moreana cool nights all year and no great extremes of temperature plus high humidity - coastal Tasmania . Colin showed me one in a specially equipped greenhouse at RSBG that was kept at a cloudforest temperature with constant misting and it was doing really well .

Troy

I saw that one in Sydney when I was there last year. It was cool and humid in there and looked great.

I had some Chambeyronia macrocarpa var hookeri in there with my lepidota's which are about a yr older that are huge compared to the C lepidota's. They've since been moved out into the garden under my giant bamboo. Your lepidota's are growing 3 times faster than my palms. The most tropical things I'm growing in there with them are Carpentaria acuminata, Roystonea regia, Dictyosperma album, and Dypsis lanceolata, and they grow year round, so really it's a temp thing with me. So even though it's cooler in their in summer, it's not cool enough.

Best regards

Tyrone

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LJG

Just looked back at my pic from 14 Jun 2010 and on average mine have grown a spear or maybe a leaf in 1 year. That's slow. Must be the average temps through the year being a tad high. Compare that to my Dwarf Malay coconut which has put out 5 leaves in the same time, and I'm beginning to wonder which one is the real challenge. The ones that died must have just totally stopped during summer and couldn't start up again. I'm not giving up though.

Best regards

Tyrone

Thats Interesting Tyrone my little lepidota has grown a full spear in 4 months. This seems like a palm that has similar requirements to Lepidorachis moreana cool nights all year and no great extremes of temperature plus high humidity - coastal Tasmania . Colin showed me one in a specially equipped greenhouse at RSBG that was kept at a cloudforest temperature with constant misting and it was doing really well .

Troy

I saw that one in Sydney when I was there last year. It was cool and humid in there and looked great.

I had some Chambeyronia macrocarpa var hookeri in there with my lepidota's which are about a yr older that are huge compared to the C lepidota's. They've since been moved out into the garden under my giant bamboo. Your lepidota's are growing 3 times faster than my palms. The most tropical things I'm growing in there with them are Carpentaria acuminata, Roystonea regia, Dictyosperma album, and Dypsis lanceolata, and they grow year round, so really it's a temp thing with me. So even though it's cooler in their in summer, it's not cool enough.

Best regards

Tyrone

I just can't imagine this high altitude is really a Lepidota. It just doesn't make logical sense. The plant grows far too fast. When mine were alive I got 6 leaves in just over a year. This makes them the fastest newcal plants I have ever grown. I mean look at Big50's. I know he is a good grower but those grew very fast! Now reports of a red emerging leaf? It would not surprise me if these turn out to be something new or something else. Maybe an odd form of Macrocarpa? Am I crazy here?

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BS Man about Palms

Same thoughts here, Len. Still not sold completely that it is not the B. velutina noted before... or a variation of it.

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Tassie_Troy1971

Looking at Bills two i am not convinced mine is a high elevation now , probably mid ? :unsure:

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Tyrone

Just looked back at my pic from 14 Jun 2010 and on average mine have grown a spear or maybe a leaf in 1 year. That's slow. Must be the average temps through the year being a tad high. Compare that to my Dwarf Malay coconut which has put out 5 leaves in the same time, and I'm beginning to wonder which one is the real challenge. The ones that died must have just totally stopped during summer and couldn't start up again. I'm not giving up though.

Best regards

Tyrone

Thats Interesting Tyrone my little lepidota has grown a full spear in 4 months. This seems like a palm that has similar requirements to Lepidorachis moreana cool nights all year and no great extremes of temperature plus high humidity - coastal Tasmania . Colin showed me one in a specially equipped greenhouse at RSBG that was kept at a cloudforest temperature with constant misting and it was doing really well .

Troy

I saw that one in Sydney when I was there last year. It was cool and humid in there and looked great.

I had some Chambeyronia macrocarpa var hookeri in there with my lepidota's which are about a yr older that are huge compared to the C lepidota's. They've since been moved out into the garden under my giant bamboo. Your lepidota's are growing 3 times faster than my palms. The most tropical things I'm growing in there with them are Carpentaria acuminata, Roystonea regia, Dictyosperma album, and Dypsis lanceolata, and they grow year round, so really it's a temp thing with me. So even though it's cooler in their in summer, it's not cool enough.

Best regards

Tyrone

I just can't imagine this high altitude is really a Lepidota. It just doesn't make logical sense. The plant grows far too fast. When mine were alive I got 6 leaves in just over a year. This makes them the fastest newcal plants I have ever grown. I mean look at Big50's. I know he is a good grower but those grew very fast! Now reports of a red emerging leaf? It would not surprise me if these turn out to be something new or something else. Maybe an odd form of Macrocarpa? Am I crazy here?

Big50's grow very fast, mine from the same seed batch grow very slow. The difference is climate. We have the full ellipse seed, so I have no reason to doubt the high elevation bit. It's a palm that once it is happy with the climate can grow fast, but if conditions aren't right can slow way down. Sounds like a high elevation palm to me.

How many losses/rot offs has Roberto had? Probably none.

Best regards

Tyrone

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LJG

Big50's grow very fast, mine from the same seed batch grow very slow. The difference is climate. We have the full ellipse seed, so I have no reason to doubt the high elevation bit. It's a palm that once it is happy with the climate can grow fast, but if conditions aren't right can slow way down. Sounds like a high elevation palm to me.

How many losses/rot offs has Roberto had? Probably none.

Best regards

Tyrone

I am not saying they are different then sold, but I would certainly not be surprised if later on down the road they turn out to be something else or named something else. Jeff Marcus thought he had a Kentiopsis piersoniorum for like 15 years only to find out recently it is a Pyriformis.

Playing devil's advocate here, but your assumption yours are slow due to climate might be incorrect and it might actually be due to the pot culture you are providing them or your growing techniques. You have stated numerous times Perth and San Diego have similar climates. I grew mine up in just over a year to having six leafs from a single spike as I got them from Marcus. This was in a greenhouse that hit over 100 degrees many times in August and September. So I had no real issue with the heat as you did. They certainly do not like it, but it did not slow my palms down to your level of growth. When mine died I assumed it was fungus like I assumed what has killed a lot of my other NewCal things. Even though I use many preventative fungicides, I was still losing things. I have since moved to the pot culture as the culprit. Cinder seems to be the key here (well I am hoping anyway). I believe Big50 uses it? I have also found the NewCal stuff like the heavier mixes as mine last longer as my mixes get heavier. I can't wait to try my new cinder mix with some new stuff from Marcus.

Back to the rate of growth. These are still slow even in Hawaiian gardens where Cloud Forest palms tower over a person's garden. So the cool Hawaiian micros climates that allow for tough to grow Central and South American cloud forest stuff doesn't help with Lepidota? Can you name another NewCal plant that gives you the growth I saw and documented or that Big50 has documented? I can only think of Macrocarpa. Maybe Oliviformis? Has anyone else grown other species of NewCal this fast? I am really curious.

Another interesting thing is that Big50 stated his are starting to open up red. This interest me too because I thought Lepidota was always green. I have no knowledge if this is true or not and PONC doesn't state anything.

PONC does state that the mid stuff is understory and the high stuff is an emergent palm. So it is obvious there are differences. But I would be curious to find out if growth rates are vastly different in their specific habitats. Right now Chambeyronia houailou is listed under Macrocarpa. But I hear it will soon be its own species. That would not surprise me because it is so different from Macrocarpa from the very beginning. Heck, from a far it looks more like Lepidota then Macrocarpa in NewCal pics.

Anyway, I am sure I derailed this topic enough. Again this post was for argument's sake. :mrlooney:

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Tyrone

Well I don't have the rock cinder which is true. We averaged for 3 months 90-93F and we don't get the equivalent May-Jun gloom San Diego gets. We had many days above 100F often in a row. Looking at San Diego's averages they are closer to Madiera in Portugal than Perth. In summer Perth doesn't cool off once the sun goes down. It can frequently still be 80-86F at midnight in summer. I think it's a temperature issue, as all my other lowland stuff thrives in there.

But it's good to think outside the square. Roberto's plants look like what I would expect a juvenile lepidota to look like, with all that brown scale etc.

As it is, I think I'm more likely to get my Golden Dwarf Malay coconut to fruit than get a lepidota to any size soon.

Best regards

Tyrone

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richnorm

Hi everyone, Here are three of mine

post-3749-005566900 1307961043_thumb.jpgThis one purchased as a one leaf seedling.

post-3749-039911200 1307961350_thumb.jpgThis one i germinated from RPS seed as high elevation form.

post-3749-008325400 1307961520_thumb.jpg

This one was also purchased as a one leaf seedling recently and had the seed still attached,the leaf was obviously different but the seed was identical to the others(RPS)needless to say i was a little confused untill reading this thread.Would any body be able to tell me which is which?I dont have the seed shells anymore but i do remember they seemed identical from the outside.Regards Craig.

First two are the high form. Third one could be the mid/low form but might just be stretched.

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Pedro 65

Here are mine today. I gave them some rock minerals (Nutritech Soft Phos Rock) and some Potassium Magnesium humates (Nutritech K Mag humates) a bit of Grocote fert and a spray for some scale that was on them. I thought the rock minerals would be good for these NC palms and as the softrock is high in pH I've combined them with the humates which are acid, so hopefully they'll cancel each other out and be neutral. Mine look like rubbish compared to Craig's and Big50 in Portugal. I don't even think they've grown since spring. I put them in the greenhouse spread apart for good air movement up against the shadecloth wall where it's very breezy and they will get all the cold winter breezes and rain. In summer I'll be putting some coolnet misters above them to keep them cool and humid but not totally soaking wet. Let's see if I can get these cranking. I also cleaned the shadehouse roof of all the debris from the gumtree which was blocking light and stopping air movement. It's now bright breezy and cool in there.

Best regards

Tyrone

Tyrone, i know where a few of these would be right at home. :D

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richnorm

How much light do yours get Tyrone? The Petioles seem longer and thinner than typical for the high form. I'm not doubting that it is the high form as it looks right in other respects but the slow speed may just be as simple as a lack of light.

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Tyrone

How much light do yours get Tyrone? The Petioles seem longer and thinner than typical for the high form. I'm not doubting that it is the high form as it looks right in other respects but the slow speed may just be as simple as a lack of light.

They have been sitting in the darkest area of my shadehouse. I sat them there because it was the coolest area. It may be too dark for any growth though. Trouble is, if you get any light on them up goes the temp. If I can keep them bright and cool and breezy that may make a difference. Where they are now is quite bright.

Best regards

Tyrone

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Tyrone

Here are mine today. I gave them some rock minerals (Nutritech Soft Phos Rock) and some Potassium Magnesium humates (Nutritech K Mag humates) a bit of Grocote fert and a spray for some scale that was on them. I thought the rock minerals would be good for these NC palms and as the softrock is high in pH I've combined them with the humates which are acid, so hopefully they'll cancel each other out and be neutral. Mine look like rubbish compared to Craig's and Big50 in Portugal. I don't even think they've grown since spring. I put them in the greenhouse spread apart for good air movement up against the shadecloth wall where it's very breezy and they will get all the cold winter breezes and rain. In summer I'll be putting some coolnet misters above them to keep them cool and humid but not totally soaking wet. Let's see if I can get these cranking. I also cleaned the shadehouse roof of all the debris from the gumtree which was blocking light and stopping air movement. It's now bright breezy and cool in there.

Best regards

Tyrone

Tyrone, i know where a few of these would be right at home. :D

I hear ya. :D

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Tyrone

This thread has been great for recording experiences and when things happened. I got my seed in Nov 08 I think. I remember some big delay, so it may even have been as late as Dec 08 or Jan 09. I got 43 seeds, another friend got 43 and another got 43 or 44 (total 130).

I put mine into 2 com pots with a mix of Richgro Proffesional mix and some well rotted humus like compost from under my Eucalyptus, put them in the shade in my garden and let the sprinklers get them. By June 2009 approx 6 months later I had "some opening spears". By Dec 2009 6 months later they were on "second spears mostly" so still quite fast in the summer, so a leaf every 6 months.

In March 2010 I reported that none had died from the summer in the compots. They were still under canopy, not in a greenhouse. In june 2010 I reported that I had potted them into individual pots in March and from the 27 germinated 6 died by June once repotted. The cause was possible transplant shock and some bore water stain on the leaves which I remember being moderate, a slight tinge. I since removed them from that area to eliminate the bore stain.

My largest ones in Jun 2010 had 2 leaves and no visible spear. So from Dec 09-June 2010 they had only opened their second spear, so we are now down to about 1 leaf a year speed, from 1 leaf every 6 months only 6 months before. This could be due to the seed nutrition being used up.

By June 2011 the plants have spent a year within the shadehouse. I'm down from 21 plants (some were eaten by rats) to 12 plants. Most have two leaves and a spear but I have one with 3 leaves. So the speed now is a spear every year, which may be an open leaf every 18-24 months.

I'm thinking that the deaths were caused by transplant shock, and high temps. I'm thinking the slow growth may be due to the bit of bore stain they got, the low light in the shadehouse and the high ambient temps in summer.

Of the 3 of us who got seed, I had the highest germination rate with 27 out of 43. One other party used ambient heat in quite a warm tunnel and got quicker germination than me but about 17 plants. The last party put his seed on a heatmat at 30C and got zero germination.

The other day I gave them a side dressing of Soft Phos Rock and Potassium Magnesium humates. I'm hoping this will have some benefits of the Volcanic rock others use. The Soft Phos Rock is 9% Calcium phosphate, 26% silicon, 20% calcium, 2% iron, 6600ppm Magnesium, 4500ppm Sulfur, 1590ppm Carbon, 1500ppm Manganese, 325ppm Zinc. The Potassium Mag humates is around 80% humic acid, 6.5% Potassium, 2.4% Magnesium, and 3% sulfur. I gave them 1g of phosrock and 0.2g of humates each which is roughly what they recommend.

So I'll keep everyone informed of their progress. The low light things is probably the biggest inhibitor of growth. When they were sprouts they could put on growth without much photosynthesis, but you'd imagine that once the seed is used up, without much light, they'd slow way down, which they have. If I can get the light to them without the heat I may be able to get them going again.

Best regards

Tyrone

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Pedro 65

This thread has been great for recording experiences and when things happened. I got my seed in Nov 08 I think. I remember some big delay, so it may even have been as late as Dec 08 or Jan 09. I got 43 seeds, another friend got 43 and another got 43 or 44 (total 130).

I put mine into 2 com pots with a mix of Richgro Proffesional mix and some well rotted humus like compost from under my Eucalyptus, put them in the shade in my garden and let the sprinklers get them. By June 2009 approx 6 months later I had "some opening spears". By Dec 2009 6 months later they were on "second spears mostly" so still quite fast in the summer, so a leaf every 6 months.

In March 2010 I reported that none had died from the summer in the compots. They were still under canopy, not in a greenhouse. In june 2010 I reported that I had potted them into individual pots in March and from the 27 germinated 6 died by June once repotted. The cause was possible transplant shock and some bore water stain on the leaves which I remember being moderate, a slight tinge. I since removed them from that area to eliminate the bore stain.

My largest ones in Jun 2010 had 2 leaves and no visible spear. So from Dec 09-June 2010 they had only opened their second spear, so we are now down to about 1 leaf a year speed, from 1 leaf every 6 months only 6 months before. This could be due to the seed nutrition being used up.

By June 2011 the plants have spent a year within the shadehouse. I'm down from 21 plants (some were eaten by rats) to 12 plants. Most have two leaves and a spear but I have one with 3 leaves. So the speed now is a spear every year, which may be an open leaf every 18-24 months.

I'm thinking that the deaths were caused by transplant shock, and high temps. I'm thinking the slow growth may be due to the bit of bore stain they got, the low light in the shadehouse and the high ambient temps in summer.

Of the 3 of us who got seed, I had the highest germination rate with 27 out of 43. One other party used ambient heat in quite a warm tunnel and got quicker germination than me but about 17 plants. The last party put his seed on a heatmat at 30C and got zero germination.

The other day I gave them a side dressing of Soft Phos Rock and Potassium Magnesium humates. I'm hoping this will have some benefits of the Volcanic rock others use. The Soft Phos Rock is 9% Calcium phosphate, 26% silicon, 20% calcium, 2% iron, 6600ppm Magnesium, 4500ppm Sulfur, 1590ppm Carbon, 1500ppm Manganese, 325ppm Zinc. The Potassium Mag humates is around 80% humic acid, 6.5% Potassium, 2.4% Magnesium, and 3% sulfur. I gave them 1g of phosrock and 0.2g of humates each which is roughly what they recommend.

So I'll keep everyone informed of their progress. The low light things is probably the biggest inhibitor of growth. When they were sprouts they could put on growth without much photosynthesis, but you'd imagine that once the seed is used up, without much light, they'd slow way down, which they have. If I can get the light to them without the heat I may be able to get them going again.

Best regards

Tyrone

Tyrone, glad you mentioned your Bore water,it could be giving you some problems for sure, as you know all the New C palms here have been very helped along by mother natures rain and creek water..But,around 10 years ago when it was very dry,i got lazy and watered with supply water which is chlorinated... after a few weeks of this they looked terrible,most palm seedlings hate chlorinated water im very positive NC Palm seedlings detest it,they may live but sure dont thrive..wanted to share this. Cheers Pete

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Tyrone

Thanks Pete. I find the bore water is great for palms provided it's not on the leaves. I have plenty of iron in the water which palms love on their roots, especially when they're growing in sand, but bore stain on the leaf stops light getting to the leaf. Never had a problem with chlorinated water, except the cost of it. :) The salt content of my bore water is 100 times less than the tap water, but the iron makes it unpalatable.

Best regards

Tyrone

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Pedro 65

Thanks Pete. I find the bore water is great for palms provided it's not on the leaves. I have plenty of iron in the water which palms love on their roots, especially when they're growing in sand, but bore stain on the leaf stops light getting to the leaf. Never had a problem with chlorinated water, except the cost of it. :) The salt content of my bore water is 100 times less than the tap water, but the iron makes it unpalatable.

Best regards

Tyrone

Tyrone, when your palms arrive here to their new home they will be "Singin in the rain" and relishing the Soft water :D :D Cheers Pete

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Tyrone

Thanks Pete. I find the bore water is great for palms provided it's not on the leaves. I have plenty of iron in the water which palms love on their roots, especially when they're growing in sand, but bore stain on the leaf stops light getting to the leaf. Never had a problem with chlorinated water, except the cost of it. :) The salt content of my bore water is 100 times less than the tap water, but the iron makes it unpalatable.

Best regards

Tyrone

Tyrone, when your palms arrive here to their new home they will be "Singin in the rain" and relishing the Soft water :D :D Cheers Pete

Good. My bore water has a pH of 6.5, so it's still "soft". :D

Best regards

Tyrone

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Tassie_Troy1971

We Had a frost here on Thursday morning coldest it's been for 2 yrs 0.6C 33F and my Ledidota was fully exposed and looks perfect .so as far as cold hardiness goes its a real winner :D !

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Tyrone

We Had a frost here on Thursday morning coldest it's been for 2 yrs 0.6C 33F and my Ledidota was fully exposed and looks perfect .so as far as cold hardiness goes its a real winner :D !

Cool. :D

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Big50

Here is an example of what I have observed in some of my lepidote,most open completely green leaves,few shows this color.

post-1131-093746200 1308384730_thumb.jpg

post-1131-051429300 1308384739_thumb.jpg

post-1131-034503300 1308384746_thumb.jpg

post-1131-066100100 1308384755_thumb.jpg

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Pedro 65

Here is an example of what I have observed in some of my lepidote,most open completely green leaves,few shows this color.

These are crankn (growing really well), how old are they? Very impressive..wanted to add.. the leaf colouration as talked about in previous posts, this is hardly red, your certainly on a winner here, well done.

Edited by Pedro 65

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Tassie_Troy1971

Here is an example of what I have observed in some of my lepidote,most open completely green leaves,few shows this color.

:drool: Huge ! you are onto something ! what are you using for fertilizer ?

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Tyrone

Here is an example of what I have observed in some of my lepidote,most open completely green leaves,few shows this color.

Woohoooo!!!!!

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Big50

These are crankn (growing really well), how old are they? Very impressive..wanted to add.. the leaf colouration as talked about in previous posts, this is hardly red, your certainly on a winner here, well done.

I received this seeds in 29-09-2008,meet three years in September. :winkie:

:drool: Huge ! you are onto something ! what are you using for fertilizer ?

Hi Troy,this year is that e started to fertilize this palms,them to apply a slow release fertilizer 10-10-10.

Sorry for my bad english,would like to contribute more often but I find it quite difficult for me.

Regards.

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Pedro 65

These are crankn (growing really well), how old are they? Very impressive..wanted to add.. the leaf colouration as talked about in previous posts, this is hardly red, your certainly on a winner here, well done.

I received this seeds in 29-09-2008,meet three years in September. :winkie:

:drool: Huge ! you are onto something ! what are you using for fertilizer ?

Hi Troy,this year is that e started to fertilize this palms,them to apply a slow release fertilizer 10-10-10.

Sorry for my bad english,would like to contribute more often but I find it quite difficult for me.

Regards.

Very Inspiring Roberto, and your english is Fantastic, please keep us all updated. Pete

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LJG

Wow. Those things are big. Again, great job growing them.

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BS Man about Palms

Much respect is due to you Roberto, thanks for leading the way... :)

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Tyrone

Roberto your English is very good. We don't really speak the Queens English here anyway, so you being here giving your comments is much appreciated. We can understand you very well. :)

Best regards

Tyrone

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richnorm

Superb job Roberto. You got your seed two years before me but even so I can't imagine getting close to that growth rate. It's very hard to reconcile your plants with those others have been nurturing for 20 years. Surely this high form is something different, maybe even a highland form of macrocarpa?

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richnorm

Here are my two High forms, a little less than a year from seed which was already almost two years old. They were really slow to get started but seem to be picking up pace now. The one on the right is actually quite red but the flash sucked out the colour. Note it's going pinnate on the second leaf.

The other shot is of one of my low forms, two years from seed.

cheers

Richard

post-264-050346100 1308553954_thumb.jpg

post-264-021454600 1308554012_thumb.jpg

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Pedro 65

Exciting stuff,good luck with future growth but doesnt sound like you need it. Pete

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John in Andalucia

My "lowlander" is pushing a new leaf. Narrower leaf blade than the highland form?

post-1155-048595200 1308583896_thumb.jpg

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BS Man about Palms

Thats how I see it John.

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Tassie_Troy1971

Well i officially consider my Chambeyronia lepidota to be a VERY COLD HARDY PALM the last 7 days we have had the colest winter weather i can remember one day it didn't getabove 5.6c 45f with wind so strong it felt like -6c (20f ) and rain and a low of 0.7c 33f . The palm still looks perfect despite being outdoors in all of this. :drool:

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