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palmislandRandy

Huge Pythons Invading The Everglades!

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palmislandRandy

There are now an estimated 150,000 Pythons in the Florida Everglades http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20090528/od_nm/...rglades_pythons Yikes, I hope they at least eat the Iguanas. Burmese pythons get to 15 ft long & fast! They eat mammals as large as a deer, live 25 years & poop like a horse. Oh great.

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Moose

I was at a Boy Scout Order of the Arrow (scout Honor Society) event with my son last December in Everglades National Park. I actually observed young pythons sunning themselves early in the morning. They were about 24 inches long. The python population appears to be breeding quite well in the Evergaldes.

Ron.

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SubTropicRay

The bounty hunters will soon be out in force.

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Eric in Orlando

I remember 10 years ago I visted the Deering Estate (south of Fairchild) and went on the walking tour in the hammock preserve. They mentioned the pythons and boas were a pest then along with the iguanas. They were finding lots of egg nests and were trying to eradicate them then. They showed us several nests on the walk

There was a small one about 3ft long living under the dock overlook on the lake here. He would come out from between the boards and sun himself but quickly went back under if someone approached. Haven't seen him since last summer.

I read that those Burmese Pythons can tolerate some cold and could easily spread further north, through FL and into the lower third of GA, AL, MS, etc. and west into eastern TX. I guess they would be a zone 8 snake.

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Jeff Searle
The bounty hunters will soon be out in force.

Ray,

I just read today in the Miami Herald that this is something they are considering. This has become a huge problem and will definitely only get worse if they can't control them somehow. With my yard evolving into a wet/shady jungle, it's only a matter of time before one turns up in my yard. I'll introduce him to Mr. Machete, a close friend of mine. :lol:

Jeff

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John Case
The bounty hunters will soon be out in force.

Ray,

I just read today in the Miami Herald that this is something they are considering. This has become a huge problem and will definitely only get worse if they can't control them somehow. With my yard evolving into a wet/shady jungle, it's only a matter of time before one turns up in my yard. I'll introduce him to Mr. Machete, a close friend of mine. :lol:

Jeff

Its good to have friendsssss :)

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DoomsDave
The bounty hunters will soon be out in force.

Ray,

I just read today in the Miami Herald that this is something they are considering. This has become a huge problem and will definitely only get worse if they can't control them somehow. With my yard evolving into a wet/shady jungle, it's only a matter of time before one turns up in my yard. I'll introduce him to Mr. Machete, a close friend of mine. :lol:

Jeff

Its good to have friendsssss :)

Ah yes, sahib, I hear they are very very good curried . . . . .

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Moose

If it is found that they are good marinated in mojo, it may solve the problem. We have a world wide audience, please help the Everglades and post your favorite python recipes. :lol:

Ron.

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palmmermaid

I am looking for ideas on how to kill the iguana in my yard. They move faster than the python. I got one last winter when it was cold but want to get the other one this summer. Any ideas? It doesn't have to be humane just deadly.

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bubba

150,000! I thought I read 25,000 last year! That means around one million next year. If they start growing wings, you know we are in trouble.

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www.dadluvsu.com

Searle, you still up for planting tahina out dere? :lol:

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EllisB

About 10 years ago we went to the state with a proposal. We (Natural Selections) would go into the Everglades log and capture all large pythons and boas and house them. We prepared a grant request to help with the funds so we could build proper cages and with food. We had a biologist, a vice president of a bank, a lawyer and some of the best animal handler in south Florida. We were told there was no threat with invasive pythons or boas at this time. These creatures have been here for a long time. And as long as there is plenty of food they will stay. Snakes are very effective hunters. They lay in wait and use very little energy. One good meal can last them a month. Unfortunatly with all the strays out there (especially now with people letting loose there pets cause they can't afford them) they will have plenty of food. The only one who wins are all those shows that love to showcase the monsters of the Everglades. Sleep tight and lock all doors and windows. Ellis

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palmislandRandy
I am looking for ideas on how to kill the iguana in my yard. They move faster than the python. I got one last winter when it was cold but want to get the other one this summer. Any ideas? It doesn't have to be humane just deadly.

A Red Ryder BB gun! :P

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Jeff Searle
Searle, you still up for planting tahina out dere? :lol:

As the legendary Jim Glock would say.....you betcha !! I think a little pra team in action this summer deep into the woods(?). Highly illegal, but what excitment! Black boots, brown bag lunch, cell phone(just in case we get a tad of course) second cell phone in case I drop mine in the water, drinking water, flashlight, mini shovel, camera, nutricote,& machete all will be needed. Any international funding and grants written are welcomed. :)

Jeff

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Moose

Jeff - are you anf Glock trying to scam a grant? :lol: Cell phones don't work in most of the Everglades! :o

Ron. :D:floor:

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Jerry@TreeZoo
I am looking for ideas on how to kill the iguana in my yard. They move faster than the python. I got one last winter when it was cold but want to get the other one this summer. Any ideas? It doesn't have to be humane just deadly.

Kitty,

I hear that Ambesol, the thing you put on your gums for sore teeth, paralyses cane toads. I figure it would do the same to iguanas. Get yourself a paintball gun and fill the balls with Ambesol. Good hunting!

Jeremiah

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Jeff Searle
I am looking for ideas on how to kill the iguana in my yard. They move faster than the python. I got one last winter when it was cold but want to get the other one this summer. Any ideas? It doesn't have to be humane just deadly.

Kitty,

I hear that Ambesol, the thing you put on your gums for sore teeth, paralyses cane toads. I figure it would do the same to iguanas. Get yourself a paintball gun and fill the balls with Ambesol. Good hunting!

Jeremiah

Paintball gun? Did somebody say paintball gun? I'm your man....I'm a little jealous that I don't have anything that big to shoot in my yard.

Jeff

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palmmermaid

Paintball gun? Hmm. I will have to think about a paintball gun loaded with ambesol bullets. Jeff, come on up and give it a whirl.

BB gun? :mrlooney: That wouldn't even slow them down. Unless you hit them in the eye. I am not that good of a shot. Maybe with practice. I was thinking more along the lines of a 12-gauge loaded with buck shot...

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Moose

Use a .22 with a potato over the barrel, the poor man's silencer. You can dispatch them without alarming the neighbors. :)

Of course I have "no personal experience" with this, something I had heard. :lol:

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sumognat
I am looking for ideas on how to kill the iguana in my yard. They move faster than the python. I got one last winter when it was cold but want to get the other one this summer. Any ideas? It doesn't have to be humane just deadly.

I had a couple in my yard last year--they enjoyed sunning (and pooping :rage: ) on my pool pavers and swimming in my pool. One grew to at least 3' from eating my neighbor's mangoes. The problem was solved when my terrier mix got to it, before I could call him off of it. He gave it a couple of good shakes and mortally wounded it.

This year, I noticed another, smaller one hanging out in my yard. I haven't decided if I should let the dog take care of this one, too, or if I should use the Crossman bb gun I borrowed from my dad when I found out that all my zinnia and cosmo seedlings were being eaten in my flower bed. :evil::rage:

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Palmə häl′ik

I wonder if the freezes put a dent on the iguana population this year?

~Ray.

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palmmermaid

Ray,

I don't know if the freezes hurt the population except for the one I killed while he was ikn a stupor. I knocked him out of a tree and used a shovel to take care of him. I still have the one left and am working on his demise.

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Palmə häl′ik

:) Funny Kitty!

Line up them crosshairs SumoGnat

~Ray

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Moose

With this heat, I am sure the pythons are just popping out of their eggs like crazy out in the everglades. Just saw a news report this evening that said they are becoming an issue in North Florida. An experiment in North Carolina just began by releasing 7 pythons with internal radio transmitters. They want to see if they survive the winter. What if they do and start breeding? :blink:

The moose is loose on Palm Talk :drool:

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amazon exotics

Florida has native snakes that are here to help control the rodent population, however, these snakes are killed daily by ignorant home owners, landscapers, cars, cats and habitat loss. It would take decades of Pythons being born too replace all the millions of Florida native snakes that have been killed over time. It's been like 17 years already since hurricane Andrew hit Miami which destroyed their zoo which released all kind of exotic animals and i sure don't see that it has destroyed nature yet. Why do people hate them, because they get larger than other snakes? What would you rather walk up on, a Python or a 6 foot Diamond Back Rattler? I'll take the Python. What's wrong with the Iguana's living here? Nothing! So what if they crap on your dock or eat your mango's is that a reason too kill them?

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bubba

Honestly, if people were able to survive in South Florida in the late 1800's without problems, I truly believe they will survive Pythons. After reading Bartram and some of his run-ins with Gators, Snakes and Wild Boar, Pythons seem rather tame. One truly interesting part of Bartram's Book was when he was treed for nearly a full day by a pack of Boars before he stumbled onto the first Royal.

One thing not pointed out about Pythons is they are singular predators. Gators attack in mass and start eating each other if they are still hungry. This does not mention the surging Florida Croc population. It seems best just to stay inside and hide. I hope the Pythons do not cross breed with Mocaisons. Our only hope is that Pythons move to Alaska, where they can help the impoverished Polar Bears. Me, I enjoy Iguanas and that Bright Green they lend to the day. Forget the pool poop.

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Borgy230

Its not about the threat to the human population, but the threat to native species! The python has no natural enemy here in the Everglades, they will be able to breed uncontrollably.

Being all plant people, do we want invasive plants in our land? taking over everything? look at it the same way!

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amazon exotics

Borgy, Pythons and Florida native constrictors have the same diet. Pythons do have enemy,s also, I'm sure any bobcat or panther love too snack on them for lunch. Birds & other animals love the little hatchlings also. Last hunting season I found a skeleton of a huge Python in the Everglades and something killed it then other animals picked the bones clean. It was a food source for other animals. When it comes to native or invasive plants, were all guilty. I would guess that there isn't one person on this board that has a totally native yard or never planted a invasive plant.

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amazon exotics

Borgy, Pythons and Florida native constrictors have the same diet. Pythons do have enemy,s also, I'm sure any bobcat or panther love too snack on them for lunch. Birds & other animals love the little hatchlings also. Last hunting season I found a skeleton of a huge Python in the Everglades and something killed it then other animals picked the bones clean. It was a food source for other animals. When it comes to native or invasive plants, were all guilty. I would guess that there isn't one person on this board that has a totally native yard or never planted a invasive plant.

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bubba

No question that zillions of species have been released not only into the fertile Glades over many years with a clear acceleration in recent years. I believe that the Glades has been a melting pot from the time it rose out of the Atlantic. It is no suprise that the American Alligator has remained on the top of the heap, which it will notwithstanding the Burmese Python. If you have ever watched a mass Gator feeding, you will understand why.

This does not mean that urban dwellers should be allowed to freely dump their exotic pets into the Glades when they tire of them. In all candor, it is probably a death sentence.

Burmese Pythons are the big news story. They are scary to people who have watched movies. These same people are afraid of gators,lizards and sharks because of movies.They are not afraid of Nile Monitors yet because there have been no movies. Probably the truly scariest of all is a troop of Wild Boars. I predict no movies for this species because Hollywood will be unable to get past the "pig" connotation. Accordingly, people will continue to live without fear of Boars although they are the most fearsome.

Regarding vegetation, we in this Forum are all about expanding the list of "exotic Palms and Plants". We do this certainly with as much care as possible and we all hope that if someone were to encounter the next "Brasilian Cherry", we would make honest efforts to thwart it's proliferation. That stated, Florida, and especially Pan-Tropical South Florida is an area that causes difficulty when assigning the term indigenous, naturalized and native and my guess is it always will.

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Moose
Borgy, Pythons and Florida native constrictors have the same diet. Pythons do have enemy,s also, I'm sure any bobcat or panther love too snack on them for lunch. Birds & other animals love the little hatchlings also. Last hunting season I found a skeleton of a huge Python in the Everglades and something killed it then other animals picked the bones clean. It was a food source for other animals. When it comes to native or invasive plants, were all guilty. I would guess that there isn't one person on this board that has a totally native yard or never planted a invasive plant.

Derek - I think the Skunk Ape dined on that python and then shared it with the other critters. :lol:

Ron. :D

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palmmermaid

Ron,

You know about the Skunk Ape?? We've actually been to the Skunk Ape Museum - pitiful. Not many people know about this legend.

I never kill one of the native snakes. I like them in my garden. I like anything that eats rats - except cats. I don't like cats. Cats kill more native birds - millions each year - than are lost to any other cause. I don't like iguanas, pythons, or other exotic animals in my garden because they are exotic. I try to be very careful about what non-natives I plant. I've made a few mistakes and paid dearly for it trying to eradicate them!

Still have that 1 iguana. He will be a goner this winter if I don't finish him off before the cold.

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Moose

Kitty - in the late 1960's there were all kinds of "sightings" of the infamous Skunk Ape in Southwestern Miami-Dade County (it was just plain old Dade then). I was a child then and it was a constant topic at school then. The "skunk" part was derived from "witnesses" that had gotten so close to the Skunk Ape, that it was reported that there was a definite strong pungent odor eminating from the creature. There was also much speculation that this was a southern relative of "Big foot". By the early to mid 1970's the sightings seemed to wain. The area of the sightings was the Kendall Lakes area. Now there are approximately 600,000 people living in the area. Did the rapid urban sprawl drive out the "Skunk Ape" or did the legend move when the "good old boys" got pushed out by the developers?

Sounds like a potential Carl Hiassen novel :blink:

Ron. :winkie:

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Jerry@TreeZoo

I never saw the movie but the "Legend of Boggy Creek" is about the Florida Skunk Ape.

When I was a kid, I dumped an Oscar into a rock pit in northern Broward. I am so ashamed.

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LJG

Funny reading some comments here. Some should leave it to the pros. :)

Just curious, but are any native snakes apex predators? The Python is. This is why people with 8+ years of education and carry a Ph.D are a little worried. Same thing with the Snakehead.

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bubba

Len, I am an admitted non-expert but am quite familiar with the Glades. I do have a Juris Doctorate, which some contend would allow me to swim with the fishes. As a rank amateur,I understand the term Apex Predator to simply imply top of the food chain.

In the Glades that would mean typically,Alligators, Bears, Panthers and to a lesser degree Wild Boars, because they are more high grounders and you do not run into them frequently in the Glades. With the advent of the Burmese Python, we now our entertaining numerous reports from our media(particularly on slow news days) of the horrific consequences that the proliferation of the Burmese Python portends for the Glades. This is doubly true based upon the combination of Global Warming and it's concomitant effects.

Yes, it is apparently true that a 15 foot Burmeese Python swallowed a 5 foot Gator and either blew up or the Gator ate it's way through the side of the Python.(contested draw?) That stated, anyone familiar with Alligator culture in the Glades knows that Alligators will attack in packs just like Wild Boars. One of the worst sights I have ever witnessed was a cluster of Alligators feasting on a whining Brahma Bull. It was the worst noise and sight I ever experienced. Burmese Pythons are quite secretive in their attack habits and my limited research indicates that the liklihood of a Python cluster attack is below remote.

Alligators are promulgating just as quickly as Pythons in the Glades. So are Crocs. As an admitted rank amateur with the only education that which I have seen with my own eyes, the Gators will take the Pythons hands down. They are the Apex Predators of the Glades. Even the Swamp Ape has moved to Wisconsin.

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LJG

So does my wife. Thats not saying much :drool::)

On the snake front, who knows. it will be interesting to see what happens over the years. Maybe adding Bull Sharks to the lakes and rivers in FL will help?

do have a Juris Doctorate,

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bubba

Len, Living with a JD is a grueling experience. I have a new healthy respect for you.

That stated, the Snakes beating the Alligators in the Glades is as likely as the Trojans beating the Gators this year! You know what I mean!

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