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Eric in Orlando

Ficus dammaropsis vs. Ficus casearioides

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Eric in Orlando

A couple years ago we obtained a Ficus dammaropsis. It has never grown the giant leaves or obtained the rigidity of F. dammaropsis.

A couple weeks ago I got a Ficus kingii. I researched this and found out it is now known as Ficus casearioides. It is native to Papau, New Guinea.

Ficus dammaropsis used to be known as F. kingiana and is also native to PNG. perhaps it has been confused in the trade?

Here is the plant we got as Ficus dammaropsis but looks like the one I got as F. kingii. It appears that it will have large ornamental foliage, too.

img_0369.jpg

And here is a true F. dammaropsis

img_1626.jpg

so to recap;

Ficus dammaropsis, formerly F. kingiana

Ficus casearioides, formerly F. kingii

Both native to Papau, NG

both have large leaves

maybe confused in the trade?

anybody growing or have a photo of a mature Ficus casearioides ?

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mppalms

Eric,

Thanks for raising this topic. I received a couple of plants that look just like your first photo (can't photograph them now, as they are dead). They were received as Ficus dammaropsis, but, clearly, they are not. They didn't like our cooler night temps and went into decline. I have heard that F. dammaropsis is tolerant of cooler night temps (no frost); so, perhaps Ficus casearioides is from a lower elevation in PNG?

Jason

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Eric in Orlando

that last link doesn't seem to be working, here is the info from IPNI

Moraceae Ficus casearioides King

in Journ. As. Soc. Beng. lv. (1887) II. 403.

Original Data:

Notes: N. Guin

Author Info

Author Details

King, George (1840-1909)

Standard Form:

King

Area of Interest:

Spermatophytes

Countries:

India , United Kingdom , United Kingdom

and for F. kingii

Moraceae Ficus kingii F.Muell.

Descript. Notes Papuan Pl. ii. 58 (1890), in obs.

Original Data:

Notes: F. casearioides

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MattyB

Matt in SD also used to have one of those smaller plants with the more round leaves that he bought as F. dammeropsis but turned out not to be. Not sure if it's still alive. Hopefully he can chime in.

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LJG

This is a timely posting as this debate has been going around here lately. SoCal seems to have a run on Ficus casearioides right now and these are being passed as true F. dammaropsis which they are not of course. It is good to finally have a name for these imposters.

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bubba

That F. dammaropsis looks very interesting. Do they get too big?

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Jeff Searle

Eric,

A very interesting topic. But, as the two plants in your pictures look very similar and appear to be a ficus, the leaves look different in shape. The first picture clearly shows the leaves having a more rounder shape to it. And the second one comes to a definite point. I'm just wondering if their two different species, of just another form of the other. ?????

Jeff

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Jerry@TreeZoo

Interesting topic. Eric, the two Ficus you show certainly look different, but one is obviously years older than the other. Can the leaf shape difference just be attributed to juvenile vs adult leaves?

Jerry

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LJG

I have seen both. You can tell from an early age they are different plants.

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Eric in Orlando

The first photo is the specimen here at Leu Gardens. It has been in the ground 2 years but only was about 5ft tall. Those leaves are about 10 inches long. It is in a protected location and actually recieved cold damage so it seems tender. We only dropped to 30F but it was under high tree canopy so was much warmer, warm enough that a Traveler's Tree close by wasn't damaged at all.

The 2nd photo is at Montgomery from last July. After I saw that one it was way different than ours.

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ThunderSRQ
The first photo is the specimen here at Leu Gardens. It has been in the ground 2 years but only was about 5ft tall. Those leaves are about 10 inches long. It is in a protected location and actually recieved cold damage so it seems tender. We only dropped to 30F but it was under high tree canopy so was much warmer, warm enough that a Traveler's Tree close by wasn't damaged at all.

The 2nd photo is at Montgomery from last July. After I saw that one it was way different than ours.

I'll "come clean" (lol) and admit that I am one of the principal "instigators" re: Eric starting this discussion since I have both types. I got my true F. dammaropsis from Jeff at his sale earlier this year and then Eric told me about the F. kingii that had been offered at his Leu Gardens sale by a local (to me) vendor. So....hoping that I could score a really killer deal (they were MUCH less $$$), I bought a couple of the kingii and then asked around a little to see what the story was (with the resulting work by Eric determining that "kingii" is actually casearioides).

Although, in my opinion, the leaves look very similar in appearance (basically identical to the "untrained" eye -- meaning the "look" as opposed to the size), one other point that I feel helps distinguish between the true dammaropsis and casearoides is that the latter has a much "weaker" trunk (hence the stake in Eric's photo). My two kingii/casearoides also definitely need staking (otherwise they flop completely to the ground) while the dammaropsis I got from Jeff (same height) has a very solid trunk (and requires no staking).

I don't have a picture of the kingii/casearioides next to the dammaropsis but will take one later today and post it so the differences can be seen (as an FYI, the laves on my k/c are about 8" long -- still pretty nice -- while the d leaves are about 17" long).

Tim

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Al in Kona

Here are several pics of the Ficus dammaropsis that I have growing in the garden. It was bought as a seedling and from the very first main leaves have looked like a true Ficus dammaropsis leaf. It has kept a single main stem (no suckering) and in the past year began to lean over and now has three new growths emerging from the stem (trunk). The stem is quite flexible yet so I was thinking perhaps I should straighten it vertically and stake it so that it will grow more tree-like rather than do this present-type growth. I've never grown this plant before and would like to know if they do train well as a standard tree form or is it best to leave it grow as is? How tall does Ficus dammaropsis get? How wide can I expect the crown to grow? Thanks for any or all advise and comments.

The newest leaf is the largest and measures 80cm (3ft) long by 60cm (2ft.) wide.

post-90-1239924979_thumb.jpg

post-90-1239924992_thumb.jpg

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ThunderSRQ

Here are the pictures:

Ficus dammaropsis (Right) & F. casearioides/kingii (Left)

P1040081.jpg

Ficus dammaropsis (Left) & F. casearioides/kingii (Right)

P1040082.jpg

Ficus dammaropsis (Left) & F. casearioides/kingii (Right)

P1040084.jpg

Ficus dammaropsis (Right) & F. casearioides/kingii (Left) - stems

P1040083.jpg

Did you know that if you type the letter R inside of parenthesis -- you get this symbol in the forum post: ® (I had to type out the entire word to avoid this!)

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ThunderSRQ

Leaves:

Ficus dammaropsis leaf - top

P1040086.jpg

Ficus casearioides/kingii leaf - top

P1040085.jpg

Ficus dammaropsis leaf - bottom

P1040090.jpg

Ficus casearioides/kingii leaf - bottom

P1040087.jpg

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Matt in SD

I had some Ficus caeseroides (at least I know now that's what they were). They were from Caldwell nursery in Texas, but the owner there was getting them in from Florida. I gave/sold some and as far as I know all are dead now, including the one I kept. It was pretty clear these were not dammaropsis from the start, but they are cool looking plants. Too bad they won't grow here.

Len, I believe you are confusing what seems to be two different forms of true Dammaropsis that are in SoCal now. There is the "original" one that Jerry Andersen, Seaworld, Ron Lawyer etc... have that has a more rounded leaf. And then there is the one that has come in a couple times now (Jeff White brought some in and so did Jeff Rood), that has a slightly more elongated leaf, that is maybe a bit smaller than the original ones, and is a bit more colorful. I really think these are both dammaropsis, mine has fruited and the fruit is identical, plus the leaf texture, size etc... is the same. The more recent introduction is a more robust grower by far for me, and looks better through the winter. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I haven't seen a Ficus caeseroides around here since the four that I brought in.

Matt

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LJG

I am not sold 100% the plants are both 100% Dammaropsis still. But I do know now is it is not Ficus casearioides after looking at the abaxial surface of the leaf and leaf sheeth here in these pics. The "original" is noticeably different from the plants I saw at Rancho Soledad and that Jeff Rood has.

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Matt in SD

Yeah Len,

I was going to edit my previous post a bit...I would not argue much about whether the two dammaropsis plants here are actually the same species or not. I think they are, but they clearly are horticulturally different, so who knows. But neither is ficus casearioides for sure.

I'm really glad to have the mystery of that other ficus (kingii/casearioides) finally solved. The only odd thing is that I did some investigating when I had those plants and asked the owner of Caldwell nursery to bug her source about the origin of his original plant. He told her that he got it as a "hitchiker" seedling on a staghorn fern from somewhere in South America (forgot the exact country). So I'm a bit surprised that it's an Asian Ficus species.

Matt

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Eric in Orlando

Thunder,

Great comparision photos, you can really see the difference when they are side by side.

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Eric in Orlando
I had some Ficus caeseroides (at least I know now that's what they were). They were from Caldwell nursery in Texas, but the owner there was getting them in from Florida. I gave/sold some and as far as I know all are dead now, including the one I kept. It was pretty clear these were not dammaropsis from the start, but they are cool looking plants. Too bad they won't grow here.

Len, I believe you are confusing what seems to be two different forms of true Dammaropsis that are in SoCal now. There is the "original" one that Jerry Andersen, Seaworld, Ron Lawyer etc... have that has a more rounded leaf. And then there is the one that has come in a couple times now (Jeff White brought some in and so did Jeff Rood), that has a slightly more elongated leaf, that is maybe a bit smaller than the original ones, and is a bit more colorful. I really think these are both dammaropsis, mine has fruited and the fruit is identical, plus the leaf texture, size etc... is the same. The more recent introduction is a more robust grower by far for me, and looks better through the winter. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I haven't seen a Ficus caeseroides around here since the four that I brought in.

Matt

Matt,

Does Caldwell Nursery have an online site called Zone 9? Thats where I got the one in the photo from, Zone 9, which is located in TX.

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Al in Kona
Here are several pics of the Ficus dammaropsis that I have growing in the garden. It was bought as a seedling and from the very first main leaves have looked like a true Ficus dammaropsis leaf. It has kept a single main stem (no suckering) and in the past year began to lean over and now has three new growths emerging from the stem (trunk). The stem is quite flexible yet so I was thinking perhaps I should straighten it vertically and stake it so that it will grow more tree-like rather than do this present-type growth. I've never grown this plant before and would like to know if they do train well as a standard tree form or is it best to leave it grow as is? How tall does Ficus dammaropsis get? How wide can I expect the crown to grow? Thanks for any or all advise and comments.

The newest leaf is the largest and measures 80cm (3ft) long by 60cm (2ft.) wide.

So far no one has commented on my above questions on growing Ficus dammaropsis. I'm especially wondering just how big I can expect this plant to get? Would it possibly look better if I stake it when young so that it will be more tree-like or is it best to just let it do its own thing as far as growing goes? Anything else I should be aware of in growing this plant? I ask as I've never tried growing one before. I'd appreciate any advise or comments.

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Jerry@TreeZoo

Al,

I too would like to know more about this guy. What is the ultimate height? What is the best planting site, sun/shade/bright shade?

On your tree, without really knowing this species but working from a guess, I would place three stakes around your tree and loosely tie the tree to it. This should do two things, get it to grow straighter and being somewhat loose, making the stem strengthen a bit. When a tree can bend and sway in the breeze, it builds up strength to compensate. Stake too tightly and its like a broken leg left in a cast too long, weak.

Jerry

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Jeff Searle
Here are several pics of the Ficus dammaropsis that I have growing in the garden. It was bought as a seedling and from the very first main leaves have looked like a true Ficus dammaropsis leaf. It has kept a single main stem (no suckering) and in the past year began to lean over and now has three new growths emerging from the stem (trunk). The stem is quite flexible yet so I was thinking perhaps I should straighten it vertically and stake it so that it will grow more tree-like rather than do this present-type growth. I've never grown this plant before and would like to know if they do train well as a standard tree form or is it best to leave it grow as is? How tall does Ficus dammaropsis get? How wide can I expect the crown to grow? Thanks for any or all advise and comments.

The newest leaf is the largest and measures 80cm (3ft) long by 60cm (2ft.) wide.

Al,

I would definitely straighten your tree back up. You want to try and have a somewhat straight, single leader tree as it gets started, as possible. Mine has been planted only about a year now, it's growing beautifully, but like yours, it has produced suckers of the main trunk down lower. The problem with this tree is, it can become top heavy and a simple rain storm or wind can blow the head over enough where the tree can't right itself back up.

The largest one I saw was growing in southeren California once in a private ( very un-friendly person) yard. It appeared to be about 20' by 20', growing out in full sun there. Here, I found it needs some shade to grow well.

Jeff

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MattyB

Keep seeing these on ebay. These are not Ficus dammaropsis, they are obviously F. casearoides (formerly F. kingii)

Buyers beware, these are possibly extremely tender for SoCal. Great looking plant, but not Ficus dammaropsis.

ebay listings

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Eric in Orlando
Keep seeing these on ebay. These are not Ficus dammaropsis, they are obviously F. casearoides (formerly F. kingii)

Buyers beware, these are possibly extremely tender for SoCal. Great looking plant, but not Ficus dammaropsis.

ebay listings

Those are definitely Ficus casearoides/kingii the "fake" Ficus dammaropsis. We got a real Ficus dammaropsis earlier this year and it is different. I planted them next to each other (with room to grow of course) and with a F. auriculata for a big leafed trio.

Ficus dammaropsis- its already produced a few figs and is only 4ft tall

img_1899.jpg

Ficus casearoides/kingii

img_1901.jpg

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MattyB

I asked the seller 'Botanical Journey' to please list the proper name on their items on ebay. This is their response:

Hello - Before I posted these I consulted some highly repected people (expecting a degree of fallout), and was forwarded some personal communications from individuals working with taxonomy on these. Despite what forums like to banter around, no one, and I mean no one, is in agreement on the assorted New Guinea Ficus, to date. Much like the aroid world, everything is always being hotly debated, and usually by the best minds, further adding to the difficulty of where to decide to place ones faith! No one buys this plant based on a 'sales pitch' and everyone, thus far, has been very well informed as to the confusing taxonomy. I feel my ad is very clear, and a hell of a lot more honest than the average ebay plant seller. As for cooler areas - that baffles me based on locations around the US where I know this exact clone is being grown without problem. I'd suggest a low humidity issue rather than an actual temperature one. It's not possible for me to make everyone happy with a name listing for this plant, and I will get conflicting requests no matter what I list it as. I understand your issue, but there is simply no remedy, to date......Thanks for the input.......Best Regards..............Jesse..........Botanical Journey

I thought it seemed like an honest response and Jesse seems like a good guy. And there is a blurb at the bottom of the item listing disclosing the confusion on this species. Just fyi, for people who like to hear both sides of the story. I've got no axe to grind, I just hate to see people get something that's different than what they're looking for. We've all done that being rare plant collectors.

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mnorell
I had some Ficus caeseroides (at least I know now that's what they were). They were from Caldwell nursery in Texas, but the owner there was getting them in from Florida. I gave/sold some and as far as I know all are dead now, including the one I kept. It was pretty clear these were not dammaropsis from the start, but they are cool looking plants. Too bad they won't grow here.

Len, I believe you are confusing what seems to be two different forms of true Dammaropsis that are in SoCal now. There is the "original" one that Jerry Andersen, Seaworld, Ron Lawyer etc... have that has a more rounded leaf. And then there is the one that has come in a couple times now (Jeff White brought some in and so did Jeff Rood), that has a slightly more elongated leaf, that is maybe a bit smaller than the original ones, and is a bit more colorful. I really think these are both dammaropsis, mine has fruited and the fruit is identical, plus the leaf texture, size etc... is the same. The more recent introduction is a more robust grower by far for me, and looks better through the winter. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I haven't seen a Ficus caeseroides around here since the four that I brought in.

Matt

Matt,

Does Caldwell Nursery have an online site called Zone 9? Thats where I got the one in the photo from, Zone 9, which is located in TX.

Hi Eric--

Zone 9 Tropicals (Bob Campos) is different from Caldwell as far as I know. I've purchased from Zone 9 in the past but could never even get a response to my e-mails to Caldwell. Good thing they didn't since I wanted one of those "dammaropsis" they offered. But perhaps Bob got his from Caldwell. You can find the Ficus "dammaropsis" on the Caldwell site, with a photo that clearly shows it NOT to be that species, at Caldwell Nursery - Collector's Items page 2. Caldwell also offers the Ficus "lacor" that YuccaDo was selling a couple of years ago, the correct name for which is actually Ficus virens. I think many people fell for the claim that it was a "deciduous" Ficus from "northern China" and a zone 8b plant (as I did) but then discovered that it has typical frost-tenderness, and dies to the ground in a freeze (though it does return and gets a little larger each year). YuccaDo held that because it was the official tree of Chongqing it was hardy. Well, Chongqing is damned chilly in winter but is basically frost-free.

One Ficus I'm trying to find is the Argentine Banyan, which must be quite hardy to cold. It is Ficus luschnathiana and looks from one picture I saw remarkably like a bengalensis at leaf-level. I've never seen it offered, do you know a source, and do you grow it at Leu?

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fastfeat
Anyone growing Ficus arnottiana, Indian Rock Fig? I have a small one to plant out. Check out the foliage, this isn't my photo;

http://www.flickr.com/photos/dinesh_valke/3440372595/

ficarn.jpg

Eric--

That's a GREAT looking leaf. Looks like a cross between F. religiosa and Hura crepitans.

Where did you get yours?

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fastfeat
I asked the seller 'Botanical Journey' to please list the proper name on their items on ebay. This is their response:

Hello - Before I posted these I consulted some highly repected people (expecting a degree of fallout), and was forwarded some personal communications from individuals working with taxonomy on these. Despite what forums like to banter around, no one, and I mean no one, is in agreement on the assorted New Guinea Ficus, to date. Much like the aroid world, everything is always being hotly debated, and usually by the best minds, further adding to the difficulty of where to decide to place ones faith! No one buys this plant based on a 'sales pitch' and everyone, thus far, has been very well informed as to the confusing taxonomy. I feel my ad is very clear, and a hell of a lot more honest than the average ebay plant seller. As for cooler areas - that baffles me based on locations around the US where I know this exact clone is being grown without problem. I'd suggest a low humidity issue rather than an actual temperature one. It's not possible for me to make everyone happy with a name listing for this plant, and I will get conflicting requests no matter what I list it as. I understand your issue, but there is simply no remedy, to date......Thanks for the input.......Best Regards..............Jesse..........Botanical Journey

I thought it seemed like an honest response and Jesse seems like a good guy. And there is a blurb at the bottom of the item listing disclosing the confusion on this species. Just fyi, for people who like to hear both sides of the story. I've got no axe to grind, I just hate to see people get something that's different than what they're looking for. We've all done that being rare plant collectors.

While the arguments here regarding the taxonomy may be valid, I personally find it still rather disingenuous. If, as several people have posted, that the plant assumed to be F. kingii/F. caeseroides is not surviving SoCal winters (where true F. dammaropsis clearly does), yet is continued to be sold under the veil of "uncertain taxonony" to unsuspecting/hopeful buyers, it is the responsibility OF THE SELLER to acknowledge this to would-be buyers, IMHO. It sounds like intelligent, experienced plant people here (though maybe not taxonomists) have provided useful info to the supplier (it doesn't survive SoCal winters) in contrast to F. dammaropsis. As such, were I selling it, I would certainly take that into consideration before trying to pass off as F. dammaropsis. And as for "low humidity" causing failure, well, I think most of us know when SoCal gets its rain.

I'd look for another vendor myself, but that's just my two cents.

Ken.

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Eric in Orlando
I had some Ficus caeseroides (at least I know now that's what they were). They were from Caldwell nursery in Texas, but the owner there was getting them in from Florida. I gave/sold some and as far as I know all are dead now, including the one I kept. It was pretty clear these were not dammaropsis from the start, but they are cool looking plants. Too bad they won't grow here.

Len, I believe you are confusing what seems to be two different forms of true Dammaropsis that are in SoCal now. There is the "original" one that Jerry Andersen, Seaworld, Ron Lawyer etc... have that has a more rounded leaf. And then there is the one that has come in a couple times now (Jeff White brought some in and so did Jeff Rood), that has a slightly more elongated leaf, that is maybe a bit smaller than the original ones, and is a bit more colorful. I really think these are both dammaropsis, mine has fruited and the fruit is identical, plus the leaf texture, size etc... is the same. The more recent introduction is a more robust grower by far for me, and looks better through the winter. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I haven't seen a Ficus caeseroides around here since the four that I brought in.

Matt

Matt,

Does Caldwell Nursery have an online site called Zone 9? Thats where I got the one in the photo from, Zone 9, which is located in TX.

Hi Eric--

Zone 9 Tropicals (Bob Campos) is different from Caldwell as far as I know. I've purchased from Zone 9 in the past but could never even get a response to my e-mails to Caldwell. Good thing they didn't since I wanted one of those "dammaropsis" they offered. But perhaps Bob got his from Caldwell. You can find the Ficus "dammaropsis" on the Caldwell site, with a photo that clearly shows it NOT to be that species, at Caldwell Nursery - Collector's Items page 2. Caldwell also offers the Ficus "lacor" that YuccaDo was selling a couple of years ago, the correct name for which is actually Ficus virens. I think many people fell for the claim that it was a "deciduous" Ficus from "northern China" and a zone 8b plant (as I did) but then discovered that it has typical frost-tenderness, and dies to the ground in a freeze (though it does return and gets a little larger each year). YuccaDo held that because it was the official tree of Chongqing it was hardy. Well, Chongqing is damned chilly in winter but is basically frost-free.

One Ficus I'm trying to find is the Argentine Banyan, which must be quite hardy to cold. It is Ficus luschnathiana and looks from one picture I saw remarkably like a bengalensis at leaf-level. I've never seen it offered, do you know a source, and do you grow it at Leu?

I'm not familiar with that species. It does have a good range in South America. I looked it up on GRIN and here is where it has it native to;

Brazil: Brazil - Mato Grosso do Sul, Parana, Rio Grande do Sul, Santa Catarina

Southern South America: Argentina - Buenos Aires, Chaco, Corrientes, Entre Rios, Formosa, Misiones; Paraguay; Uruguay

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Eric in Orlando
Anyone growing Ficus arnottiana, Indian Rock Fig? I have a small one to plant out. Check out the foliage, this isn't my photo;

http://www.flickr.com/photos/dinesh_valke/3440372595/

ficarn.jpg

Eric--

That's a GREAT looking leaf. Looks like a cross between F. religiosa and Hura crepitans.

Where did you get yours?

Got it from rareplantresearch.com

It is native to India and Sri Lanka

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Hillizard
On 4/15/2009, 11:17:47, Eric in Orlando said:

A couple years ago we obtained a Ficus dammaropsis. It has never grown the giant leaves or obtained the rigidity of F. dammaropsis.

 

A couple weeks ago I got a Ficus kingii. I researched this and found out it is now known as Ficus casearioides. It is native to Papau, New Guinea.

 

Ficus dammaropsis used to be known as F. kingiana and is also native to PNG. perhaps it has been confused in the trade?

 

Here is the plant we got as Ficus dammaropsis but looks like the one I got as F. kingii. It appears that it will have large ornamental foliage, too.

 

img_0369.jpg

 

 

 

And here is a true F. dammaropsis

 

img_1626.jpg

 

 

so to recap;

 

Ficus dammaropsis, formerly F. kingiana

Ficus casearioides, formerly F. kingii

 

Both native to Papau, NG

both have large leaves

maybe confused in the trade?

anybody growing or have a photo of a mature Ficus casearioides ?

Looks like Zone 9 Tropicals has Ficus casearioides in stock: http://www.zone9tropicals.com/ficus-dammaropsis-&39dinner-plate-fig&39-p-323.html  though they're calling it F. dammaropsis. Here's a larger one (misidentified?) growing in Santa Cruz: http://fragranthill.com/124/ficus-dammaropsis-in-santa-cruz-yet-another-miracle-plant-for-the-bay-area/

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Pando
4 hours ago, Hillizard said:

Looks like Zone 9 Tropicals has Ficus casearioides in stock: http://www.zone9tropicals.com/ficus-dammaropsis-&39dinner-plate-fig&39-p-323.html  though they're calling it F. dammaropsis. Here's a larger one (misidentified?) growing in Santa Cruz: http://fragranthill.com/124/ficus-dammaropsis-in-santa-cruz-yet-another-miracle-plant-for-the-bay-area/

Just looking at the leaf shape, the one in Zone 9 Tropicals clearly IS NOT dammaropsis as it appears in the picture.

The one in Santa Cruz IS the real dammaropsis.

I hope this clears things up :)

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Hillizard
14 hours ago, Pando said:

Just looking at the leaf shape, the one in Zone 9 Tropicals clearly IS NOT dammaropsis as it appears in the picture.

The one in Santa Cruz IS the real dammaropsis.

I hope this clears things up :)

Pando: Thanks for the expert ID on those two plants and for clearing up any questions I had!

Below is a picture I just took of my F. dammaropsis here in NorCal. I keep it under a lath shelter during our blistering summers and under a patio cover in the winter, but otherwise it's outside year-round. I had to cut it back last year after it grew too tall too fast. Luckily, it branched low!

Ficus_dammaropsis.jpg

  • Upvote 1

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Pando

Looking great Hillizard!

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