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bubba

Winter in your neighborhood

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bubba

An index devised for the estimation of energy demands for cooling and heating is referred to as Cooling and Heating degree days.The number of degrees that the mean temperature for the day falls below 65 degrees F.are heating degree days; the number of degrees that the mean temperature is above 65 degrees F. are cooling degree days. I selected some locations for the month of January (Winter) to compare neighborhoods.Those in the Southern Hemisphere can use July. Key West (h) 49 © 164 , Miami (h) 76 © 141, West Palm Beach(h) 92 © 99 ,Lakeland (h) 198 © 74. How do your neighborhoods compare to these numbers?

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happ

Enjoy the study of "degree days" & faithfully calculate them each month.   :P

JAN. - Heating Degrees : 158  Cooling Degrees : 33

Depends on topography in California and can vary significantly within short distances.  Foothills up to 1500+ feet are the warmest though beach cities are also mild.  Low valley floors are the cold pockets.

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NBTX11

Texas:

Brownsville:232 H, 59 C

C.C: 338 H, 31 C

Victoria: 403 H, 21 C

Houston 468 H, 16 C

San Antonio: 494 H, 8 C

Well, that's supposed to be the average according to climate zone website, but lately it's been much less HDD.  Last Jan in S.A. we only had 205 HDD.  Very warm winter, Avg Jan high last year was 73F, avg low 43F, avg temp was around 58F.  Normal Avg Jan high is 62-65F.

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bubba

Thank you Happ and Jim.Happ with those numbers I have got to believe you should be extremely close to growing Cocos Nucifera, particularly in one of your small ,hot mini-zones.This is further verified by Jim's numbers because we have seen numerous Cocos Nucifera in the Valley area.I would like to also see these numbers from other spots around the world including but not limited to Australia, South Africa, Europe and any and all places in between.

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NBTX11

The closest Cocos to me is probably a few expirimental ones near Corpus Christi, Texas, 140 miles to the south east.  maybe someone is expirimentally growing one in Galveston TX too.

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alex_7b

For our airport, Hartsfield Atlanta (ATL) the Januaryy numbers are

HDD 692     CDD 0

THis is for a 30 year average, 1971-2000. Heat island effect is +10% over the local suburbs.

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happ

(bubba @ Nov. 02 2006,09:42)

QUOTE
Thank you Happ and Jim.Happ with those numbers I have got to believe you should be extremely close to growing Cocos Nucifera, particularly in one of your small ,hot mini-zones.This is further verified by Jim's numbers because we have seen numerous Cocos Nucifera in the Valley area.I would like to also see these numbers from other spots around the world including but not limited to Australia, South Africa, Europe and any and all places in between.

The issue that coconut palms fail in California drives loco[ l ] tropico gardeners into a snit   :o     Some jungle web sites won't allow the subject even to be discussed   :D

Rarely drops below 40F in Los Angeles but average winters observe 40+ nights in the 40's.  Chilly nights follow cold fronts of Alaska Gulf storms   Wet & cold soil are a bad combo :(   Plants go into hiberation mode.  Warm days [above 80F] can be followed by minimums well below 50F in calm arid air.

Mild climates allow many varieties of palm trees but cocos nucifera need a heat that coastal Cali cannot provide.  Bethel nut is marginal even with near non-stop irrigation.   :(

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alex_7b

"Gulf storms   Wet & cold soil are a bad combo    Plants go into hiberation mode.  Warm days [above 80F] can be followed by minimums well below 50F in calm arid air."

It's not really hibernation. Metabolism shuts down and the plants die.

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spockvr6

(alex_7b @ Nov. 07 2006,12:58)

QUOTE
"Gulf storms   Wet & cold soil are a bad combo    Plants go into hiberation mode.  Warm days [above 80F] can be followed by minimums well below 50F in calm arid air."

It's not really hibernation. Metabolism shuts down and the plants die.

Can the metabolism shut down for a certain limited period of time before the plant dies?

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happ

(spockvr6 @ Nov. 07 2006,13:16)

QUOTE

(alex_7b @ Nov. 07 2006,12:58)

QUOTE
"Gulf storms   Wet & cold soil are a bad combo    Plants go into hiberation mode.  Warm days [above 80F] can be followed by minimums well below 50F in calm arid air."

It's not really hibernation. Metabolism shuts down and the plants die.

Can the metabolism shut down for a certain limited period of time before the plant dies?

Have never lost a palm to weather [euterpe edulis/howea forsteriana/ veitchia arecina/ roystonea regia/ wodyetia bifurcata/ ravenea rivularis/areca catechu/ etc].  Nothing too exotic.

Heliconia/bauhinia/plumeria/ etc look like ****   :o

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