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Ken Johnson

Pictures of Palms at My Farm

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Ken Johnson

My "farm" is augmented by all the palms in South Florida. Some of the pix of specimens are of palms grown by someone else and then bought by me and transplanted to be put up for sale.

Yesterday I priced this Copernicia bailyana for a client of mine. If it gets approval I will start the process of rootprunning.

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Ken Johnson

Here's a pic from last year of my wife and a Satakentia that went to a house on the ocean side of Key Largo.

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Z4Devil

KEN! What the hell ... what palms you have. GREAT. I am not able to find words at the moment, after having a look to this phantastic photos.

Okay ... if I ever travel to the US, I will visit you. Promised. :D

What species do you have? Is it a problem to post all or did you mentioned all with the photos?

Best regards, Verena :)

Edited by Z4Devil

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Ken Johnson

Z4, I have shown most of what I have but here are a few more. Glad you like the post and please vist when you come. There are lots of thing other than palm to look at down here especially if you like being on the water.

By this time every one here knows that the first one is a Tahina.

The second is a "VFox". One of the smaller ones I am trying to sell.

The third is a 'South American Oil Palm" that I am tring to ID.

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Z4Devil

Ken, from the perspective of a German people I would say: this is the paradise. :) Of what a height your palms are, great. They are beautiful. On the other hand it is impossible in Germany to cultivate such tropical palms ... our climate demands cold-resistant plants. Whether the climate is changing to warmer zones ... the last winter would declare the death sentence. Most of the palms I love need temperatures up to 22 °C and high humidity. In Germany this combination is excluded, you have to boost.

Palms of such a height like yours unfortunately only grow in greenhouses. :(

Do you sell palms or are all of those phantastic plants your private pleasure?

Best regards, Verena :)

Edited by Z4Devil

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Ken Johnson
Ken, from the perspective of a German people I would say: this is the paradise. :) Of what a height your palms are, great. They are beautiful. On the other hand it is impossible in Germany to cultivate such tropical palms ... our climate demands cold-resistant plants. Whether the climate is changing to warmer zones ... the last winter would declare the death sentence. Most of the palms I love need temperatures up to 22 °C and high humidity. In Germany this combination is excluded, you have to boost.

Palms of such a height like yours unfortunately only grow in greenhouses. :(

Do you sell palms or are all of those phantastic plants your private pleasure?

Best regards, Verena :)

ALL my palms and dicots are for sale. I have shipped to Europe before. 747 style! Here is my biggest and some others. Can't grow good grapes here though!

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Z4Devil

:drool: Uff. Wooow! Palms of such a height you are shipping? I try to imagine what shipping costs the international palm enthusiastic pay.

What kind of customers order such giants? Professional gardeners, greenhouses or private customers?

The ultimate question at the end, Ken. Do you offer the species Lytocaryum? :D

Best regards, Verena

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bgl

Ken,

Enjoyed the photos, especially the ones of large Copernicias. Not too many of those around here! And you certainly have a very impressive operation! :)

Bo-Göran

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Ken Johnson

Thanks Bo. Copernicia does seem to be a Caribbean lover. Specimens planted in the Bahamas seem to do even better than in South Florida. That is the Cuban species do. The South American species seem to have less stringent parameters. I don't mean to leave out mention of the Hispaniola species but they are less desirable as landscape elements except for the Eichmann specie which can be quite striking when well grown.

Here is a shot of a Baily and macroglosa. These are not my palms. (yet)

And a shot of another one I grew.

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Carlo Morici

Excellent, Ken. Good pictures of good palms in a good nursery.

You did a wonderful life-time job.

Carlo

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Ken Johnson
Excellent, Ken. Good pictures of good palms in a good nursery.

You did a wonderful life-time job.

Carlo

Thanks Carlo. I am still planting the palms that take 20 years to be something. It has been a wild ride keeping up with all the new stuff and sticking my neck out with such long term projects. My direction has recently changed from mostly Caribbean species to Pacific rim species. The new Calidonia palms such as Kentiopsis olivaformis and Carpoxylon are growing very well for me and they are stunning palms. Satakentia has been a good grower too but seedlings were hard to come by for years. There is finally lots of seed in the U.S.A. and I have a few hundred going strong. Dypsis cabadae is another great palm and its demand has shot up as designers have learned what a beautiful palm it is. Getting them to 16' is the trick, I am only a few years away from that.

Here is a Cabadae that I just installed near Paul Drummonds old house. It went to a house on the water.

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Ken Johnson

Remember when I posted the palm heart pix?

Here's another photo

YUM!

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deezpalms

Great collection Ken, thanks for sharing!!

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Ken Johnson

A few months have gone by and the farm has changed a lot. Most of the tall Veitchia X Wodyetia in the first picture of this post are gone. only the veriagated ones are left. One big Carpoxylon now lives on Miami Beach. many cabadae and Satakentia have found new homes. Most of my biggest Zombia now live on Floridas West coast.

The baby Carpoxylon are now 3-6' tall and most of the young Satakentia have 3' of wood! the most impresive palms may be the Kentiopsis they love South Florida and are getting massive. My experiment with Burretiokentia hapala (Sp?) has gone well. I think I will plant more of those. Copernicias, especially mocroglosa, have been steady but slow. I think the Copernicia will be a good crop for people that want to grow something for 20 years before they sell it!

Here is an old shot that shows why Kentiopsis olivaformis is such a nice palm.

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bubba

Z4, Ken's place is insane. Inch for inch, side by side, whichever ways sideways, it has to be the best in Florida! I am not sure what Julia Tuttle put into that Redlands soil!

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iamjv

Impressive pics and nursery! Will have to put you in the bucket list for my Florida trip.... :) Jv

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LauraAnu

Ken,

This is a fantastic operation. I can only dream of having all these wonderful mature specimens here. :drool:

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The Germinator
Dats fo shizzle some good stuff dere, Ken! A-number 1. Load up a semi and start driving west, whats left by the time you get to California will still sell here! :)

OK who want's to carpool to FLo this weekend, we can rent a U-haul and bring the booty back to Cali. Very nice field grown specimens. :mrlooney:

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Ken Johnson
Dats fo shizzle some good stuff dere, Ken! A-number 1. Load up a semi and start driving west, whats left by the time you get to California will still sell here! :)

OK who want's to carpool to FLo this weekend, we can rent a U-haul and bring the booty back to Cali. Very nice field grown specimens. :mrlooney:

Here's one you can put in your truck! :)

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Walter John

Well I have just re-read the thread Ted and have come up with my favorite pic. I would love to see this again in a few years time.

To remind you all, by the pool, those are Satakentias high with Carpoxylons low.

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PalmGuyWC

Ken,

You seem to be the expert palm mover, so here is a question. Have you ever moved or divided a Nannorrhops? I have one that has been over grown by other palms and gets to much shade. It is only about waist high and has several trunks that are growing in different directions. Some of the trunks are more or less rhizomes that are growing on the surface of the ground. I'm wondering if the suckers that I want to divide should be cut away from the main plant before attempting to transplant them, and let them get established.

It's no big deal if I lose the palm since it's kind of hidden away, but a couple of my buddys have been bugging me for some of it and I think it could be divided into 3 plants.......that is...if they divide.

Dick

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Ken Johnson
Ken,

You seem to be the expert palm mover, so here is a question. Have you ever moved or divided a Nannorrhops? I have one that has been over grown by other palms and gets to much shade. It is only about waist high and has several trunks that are growing in different directions. Some of the trunks are more or less rhizomes that are growing on the surface of the ground. I'm wondering if the suckers that I want to divide should be cut away from the main plant before attempting to transplant them, and let them get established.

It's no big deal if I lose the palm since it's kind of hidden away, but a couple of my buddys have been bugging me for some of it and I think it could be divided into 3 plants.......that is...if they divide.

Dick

Dick, I never tried nanrops. Are there roots on the lower parts of the stem like in Seranoa? You may be able to divide it if so. Can I see a pic?

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bubba

Ken, Do you have any Cocothrinax borhidiana?

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Ken Johnson
Ken, Do you have any Cocothrinax borhidiana?

Bub, I do not grow borhidiana. Why you ask? This palm and some like it do not perform well on my farm. The reason? not sure but it may be my pH is too high. Waycool has shown borhidiana in the Keys doing very well. It is MUCH drier in the Keys so that may be a clue and the soils there are even poorer than mine so LOTS of fertilizer. This helps lower the pH. Pseudophoenix in the Keys has much the same reaction. Crinita too.

Palm growers on the peninsula do have some nice examples in thier gardens but they likley have them growing in heavy mulch and lots of food on raised and drier beds., that is easier in a garden than in a farm due to costs. I prefer to grow palms that need less maintainence. My coustomers like low cost maintence too so it works out.

Good examples of bullet proof palms include Satakentia, Kentiopsis olivaformis, Coccothrinax barbadensis, Carpoxylon and others. Poor performers have been weeded out of my pallet by themselves....they die. Most of what you see in my pix have been tested and are true performers. One example that I have which is not a good candidate but has survived is Howea belmoriana but stand by as i will plant my Rhapolostylsis this winter!

Here is Coccothrinax barbadensis.

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Patrick Palms
Satakentia are looking good considering we just went through a very dry and cold at times winter. I have a few hundred of these.

Hi Ken

I am after some Satakentia seedlings, just wondered if you knew anyone that might help?

Gary

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Ken Johnson
Satakentia are looking good considering we just went through a very dry and cold at times winter. I have a few hundred of these.

Hi Ken

I am after some Satakentia seedlings, just wondered if you knew anyone that might help?

Gary

PM me.

And thanks for all the nice comments Yall. I'll shot some new pix soon. The growing season has been extra fine this year. Satas are soaring and Kentiopsis can't be stopped. Carpoxylon you ask? OH YEA!

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ixigena

Hi Ken,

Great looking Borassus!

I have been dug up a young B. Flabelier a year ago at my friend farm land. 4 feet height no trunk, with 6 feet diameter root ball on. I put her in the 6'x8' deep wooden pot. But after 3-4 months dead even I treat her with Superthrive. What did I do wrong? Please advise.

Thanks in advance. Hendriks

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samirbouag

OMG OGM OMG je suis sur le cul! paradise paradise paradise lokk at all those palm! your garden is fantasic! thanks you so i bring my stufs and i'm coming! lol hahaha

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Pedro 65

OMG OGM OMG je suis sur le cul! paradise paradise paradise lokk at all those palm! your garden is fantasic! thanks you so i bring my stufs and i'm coming! lol hahaha

Whatever Hes on i Want some :lol: Fantastic Stuff Ken, Very Impressed :drool: Pete

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Takil-Explorer

Ken,

Maybe you can sell palms to collectors in southern China, the economy is much better downthere! And maybe Thailand and richer parts of India.

Alexander

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Mandrew968

My "farm" is augmented by all the palms in South Florida. Some of the pix of specimens are of palms grown by someone else and then bought by me and transplanted to be put up for sale.

Yesterday I priced this Copernicia bailyana for a client of mine. If it gets approval I will start the process of rootprunning.

I know where this is...

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Brad Mondel

Thanks Ken for the photos of such amazing palms that I will never see or own hah :P

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kepel

Fantastic photos, Ken. I have a baby Kentiopsis that stays indoors but to see them in their full glory is something else.

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Alberto

Ken,

What kind of Brahaea is that? It doesn't look like any of mine. Could it be a green form of B. Armata? Nice palm.

Dick

I read somwhere that Brahea brandegei was the one that can be grown in Florida.........(???)

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Alberto

Ken I bet that Brahea is B. brandegii

Matty....I think you got it! Thanks. What do you think it may be worth?

:rolleyes: Did you sold it by now?

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Ken Johnson

Ken I bet that Brahea is B. brandegii

Matty....I think you got it! Thanks. What do you think it may be worth?

:rolleyes: Did you sold it by now?

Not sold yet. It has got to be one of the oldest palms here next to the royal in the front yard.

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Ken Johnson

BRANDEGII?????

Is that a valid name? I do not know much about Brahea as they are almost never seen in Florida.

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