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Ken Johnson

Pictures of Palms at My Farm

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chris.oz
Here are the Satakentia that grace my pool and one that is on my "tree rack" that could be by your pool this weekend.

BTW the small palms under the Satakentia are Carpoxylon. I have hundreds planted!

Just superb palms Ken, your pool area looks fab.

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Ken Johnson
Ken,

Looks good, do you have neoveitchia?

I have one orphan neoveitchia that needs a home. It is in a 40 and has been around for years. I have seen nice ones in Fl but I find them to be a challenge. It's all yours if you come and get it. (And buy a palm or two at the same time?)

Dick is soooo sneaky. He wants us to get excited about Cuba and buy a guest house for him! I do not think that Cuba will be much of a market for some time. The entire group of islands to our south are suffering worse than up here. One brand new marina and hotel complex built by Wayne H. opened and closed in two years!

BTW I have grown Sabals for 25 years now. This mauritiiformis was transplanted from a yard (the owner got the palm from me as a 3' with a full head) where it was growing into the power lines. I have 3 in total from that job. I traded 3 gallon Coccothrinax for them. The owner planted the CoccoT's in a field and I will most likley buy them back for a project years from now and on and on it goes!!!!

I have about 20 of these that were field grown and then dug when between 8 and 14" tall (yes they can be transplanted when young) and held with plastic wrap around the ball and drip irrigation. They are a stunning palm.

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Ken Johnson

Here is a shot that shows how I intercrop. This Satakentia is about 5 years in the ground and the Carpoxylon under it are in the ground for about one year.

When palms get too crowded I dig the bigger ones up and put them on dripper while the little one enjoy more sun. When I fill the hole from the bigger ones I plant another one gallon to take its place.

Crop rotation of sorts. :)

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Peter Pacific
I have grown Zombia for 25 years. Some of these palms are that old! They are are out of the ground and ready for sale.

They have been on drip irrigation for months.

I have a zombia antillarum that´s about 6 years old and not even 12 inches high...is there any way to speed up the growth?

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Ken Johnson

In about 35 years your Zombia will look like this. This one did not get premium care until i got it but it was a bigun!

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Ken Johnson

It's the weekend and always time for more pix.

This is a nice Copernicia!

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Ken Johnson

I am not sure what th efirst Copernicia is but I would say it's a berteroana hybrid. the Chamberonia is showing some color and the hospita picture is more like art work.

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Howeadypsis

Geez Ken you have some amazing palms! Stunning!

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Ken Johnson

Thanks Larry.

Here's some more.

1. Allogoptera

2. Thrinax radiata

3. Wodyetia!

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Howeadypsis

Hmmm never heard of Allogoptera but I like the frond morphology! Looks very glossy!

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sonoranfans

Looking at Kens teriffic stock and his methods( NPK, water, not much mulch), I would have to say something can be learned here. Many gorgeous palms, thanks for the pics Ken. I just love that C. hospita :drool: .

Edited by sonoranfans

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Ken Johnson

Tom it is interesting that you mention my techniques for growing in limestone. I knew early on that when I dug palms from peoples yards that the soil and rock conditions were always different and almost never the same as typical field operations around here which involve growing in marl. I figured that if palms grew so well in landscapes that were built over solid limestone that I could farm palms on limestone. Turns out that some of what I grow does much better than when planted in the wetter marl and that some species never grow well in marl. The reason was not the soil type so much as how wet it was or how much fertilizer was being used! Most people do not realize that when most palm roots reach underground water pockets (we live over a huge one here) that the roots rot! There is no oxygen available so the roots die. I have transplanted many palms in low ares that had dead roots in the bottom. On the other hand I have transplanted palms that have (as most do) most of their roots on the surface...looking for nutrients. So just add fertilizer to the surface and guess what? they grow!

Here are pix of more types I grow. Some are in pots but most of what I grow is in the ground. The potted stuff needs to find a home.

here is a cabadae a few Chamadorea radicalis and a 'Ginger Bread Palm"

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Walter John

Superb palming Ken, thanks for the pics.

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Ken Johnson

Thanks Wal.

Here's more.

Copernicia gigas

Another Kentiopsis

Neoveitchia (Which may soon be in Streat 124's yard)

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palmislandRandy

Nice stuff Ken! I suspect my heavy use of mulch may be the cause of some of my "yellowish" palms :unsure:

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Ken Johnson
Nice stuff Ken! I suspect my heavy use of mulch may be the cause of some of my "yellowish" palms :unsure:

It has been a long time since I heard the lecture about how mulch breeds microbs and how the microbs use of nutrients faster than trees. It was interesting stuff and made me think twice about all the effort and expence to put down mulch and then the effort and expence of putting down fertilizer and then watching my palms decline! So no mulch on my farm and BTW I have never seen mulch on palms at any farm. Just fertilizer.

See?

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Howeadypsis
It has been a long time since I heard the lecture about how mulch breeds microbs and how the microbs use of nutrients faster than trees. It was interesting stuff and made me think twice about all the effort and expence to put down mulch and then the effort and expence of putting down fertilizer and then watching my palms decline! So no mulch on my farm and BTW I have never seen mulch on palms at any farm. Just fertilizer.

See?

Ken, is that Licuala grandis? Its fabulous! (still learning palms here)

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Ken Johnson
It has been a long time since I heard the lecture about how mulch breeds microbs and how the microbs use of nutrients faster than trees. It was interesting stuff and made me think twice about all the effort and expence to put down mulch and then the effort and expence of putting down fertilizer and then watching my palms decline! So no mulch on my farm and BTW I have never seen mulch on palms at any farm. Just fertilizer.

See?

Ken, is that Licuala grandis? Its fabulous! (still learning palms here)

That is licuala grandis.

Here's a close up of a Zombia.

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Howeadypsis
That is licuala grandis.

Here's a close up of a Zombia.

Crikey I'd never heard of Zombia before I came here,fabulous plants!

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Ken Johnson

I planted a few hundred of these. Full sun for the most part.

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buffy
It has been a long time since I heard the lecture about how mulch breeds microbs and how the microbs use of nutrients faster than trees. It was interesting stuff and made me think twice about all the effort and expence to put down mulch and then the effort and expence of putting down fertilizer and then watching my palms decline! So no mulch on my farm and BTW I have never seen mulch on palms at any farm. Just fertilizer. See?

I'm sure if that mulch had been composted first, the benefits would be the opposite. My city provides two yards of free compost a week for residents. My plants get giddy when I pull the truck around. After a year or so mulch probably starts freeing up the good stuff. But until then, it just sucks your soil dry.

Of course, I'm not telling Ken anything he doesn't already know. This is for newbies, like myself, that are bewildered by random yellowing and other apparent deficiencies.

Edited by buffy

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phatmiata

what is your address? do you have a website? I would like to stop by next time im in south Fl

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Ken Johnson
what is your address? do you have a website? I would like to stop by next time im in south Fl

I am located North of Homestaead in "The Redland". Anyone that wants to tour is welcome.

The farm is between US1 and Krome. 22845 SW 163 Ave. Call anytime 305-345-8918.

Here is a small Zombia pic and another shot of my pool area. The third pic is a Lignum Vitae, I will transplant anything so I end up with all kinds of plants. I will never stop transplanting things for the first time because there are so many different trees available in South Florida. FTBG has distributed almost everything they ever grew so the possiblities are endless

Next week I will do a white ironwood for the first time. :D

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MattyB
BTW I have grown Sabals for 25 years now. This mauritiiformis was transplanted from a yard (the owner got the palm from me as a 3' with a full head) where it was growing into the power lines. I have 3 in total from that job. I traded 3 gallon Coccothrinax for them. The owner planted the CoccoT's in a field and I will most likley buy them back for a project years from now and on and on it goes!!!!

I have about 20 of these that were field grown and then dug when between 8 and 14" tall (yes they can be transplanted when young) and held with plastic wrap around the ball and drip irrigation. They are a stunning palm.

Ken, obviously you've been doing this palm thing for much longer than me (and by that I simply mean that you're really old) but, from reading Don Hodel's treatment of Sabal in the last PSSC Journal, that palm you have pictured there looks like S. yapa to me. Hodel described the S. mauritiaformis as having the leaflets fused together in groups of 2 or 3 with the divisions into the leaf blade within the group as only being slight. He described yapa as the divisions going much deeper into the leaf blade. I see both palms being identified interchangeably all the time and I'm thoroughly confussed. :unsure:

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Walter John

I can't believe you are giving that Neoveitchia away, those babies are hard to come by here and what a grand palm they are and here they are quite tough.

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Jasen

Ironwood is a great tree. The Sri Lankan weevils down here seem to share in the opinion. Keeping them off of my ironwoods has become part of my weekly maintenance ritual here. Great pics BTW.

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Ken Johnson
BTW I have grown Sabals for 25 years now. This mauritiiformis was transplanted from a yard (the owner got the palm from me as a 3' with a full head) where it was growing into the power lines. I have 3 in total from that job. I traded 3 gallon Coccothrinax for them. The owner planted the CoccoT's in a field and I will most likley buy them back for a project years from now and on and on it goes!!!!

I have about 20 of these that were field grown and then dug when between 8 and 14" tall (yes they can be transplanted when young) and held with plastic wrap around the ball and drip irrigation. They are a stunning palm.

Ken, obviously you've been doing this palm thing for much longer than me (and by that I simply mean that you're really old) but, from reading Don Hodel's treatment of Sabal in the last PSSC Journal, that palm you have pictured there looks like S. yapa to me. Hodel described the S. mauritiaformis as having the leaflets fused together in groups of 2 or 3 with the divisions into the leaf blade within the group as only being slight. He described yapa as the divisions going much deeper into the leaf blade. I see both palms being identified interchangeably all the time and I'm thoroughly confussed. :unsure:

Matty, everyone that plays the Sabal ID game knows how hard it is. We have been through this yapa -vs- 'formis. before and all the variables that can lead you astray including a new "treatment". Don't worry young grasshopper you will soon be wise enough to not only name them all but grow them too. :greenthumb:

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Ken Johnson

Here is a big Corypha utan that I transplanted after it was devastated by hurricane Wilma. It lost most of its leaves but has made a great comeback.

Also another Copernicia gigas. This palm likes hot sunny places and turns into a giant. Some I have seen are fatter than bailyana. An interesting footnote about Copernicias from Cuba. Most have shown me that the roots actually contract after being pushed into the ground. This pulls the trunk down and I assume is an evolutionary device for anchoring the palm deeper in the ground.

The third is a studly Kentiopsis. I here more and more that this palm is cold hardy. It sure is a good looking palm.

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Ken Johnson

The royal palm is the only royal I have. It is the first palm I planted about 25 years ago. I origanly had it planted in a pot on the 8th floor balcony of my apartment in Miami Beach!

I use cats on my farm to kill rodents. Here is a new recruit!

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Palm Guy

I can't believe I missed this thread. Loving the Satakentias and Carpoxylons! They look beautiful. I'd be interested in that Neoveitchia but doubt I'd ever get it across the Atlantic.

Ken - When I pass through Florida your farm has to be one of my stops (not to invite myself of course)!

P.S. - That cat looks like a true rodent killer. I have a few around the yard that do wonders!

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Palm Guy
Thanks Bubba for the good review.

I posted an ad for Zombia in the For Sale section. A few people are interested, even Kosta wants me to ship to Greece! Don't know about that but I sure would be excited to sell some stock here in Florida. The nursery business is so slow here that field nurseries are building up stocks of bigger and bigger palms. There are now hundreds of thousands of royal palms with 20 feet of wood and NO buyers. Yes a few sales are being made but many nurseries have stock that is turning brown because they can't afford maintenance!

I am entertaining any offers and will sell for prices never before seen in the rare palm business. The Zombias I listed are a good example. They once sold for $200/ft and now are priced at $50/ft.

Reading about Home Depot selling Kentiopsis and Keiodoxa make me think that rare is not so rare any more and that prices will slide even more before they go up again.

If anyone knows about a big garden project using rare palms let them know I have plenty and that prices can't be beat.

Anybody here need a Chamberonia?

Ken, There is alot of development going on here and I would think much demand for palms. Only problem is the whole LY issue. Bermuda law wouldn't allow seeds let alone plants! Wish I could help mate.

I hate how these large retail stores such as HD and Wal mart ruin it for the specialised growers just how they displace family owned businesses whenever they arrive in town.

Keep on trucking

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Ken Johnson

If Street 123 can get the neoveitchia to grow and seed I will urge him to spread some seed your way Michael!

Here is a big Syagrus amara that I grew from a 3 gallon I got at a South Florida Palm Society palm sale. (from Jeff?) Must have been about 15 years ago. It set fruit this year. In 05 it lost most of its leaves in a hurricane!

The Coccothrinax spissa was transplanted after the same hurricane to make room for some rearranging. It looks like it needs more water.

I can't figure out what kind of Copernicia this is. Maybe a berteroana?

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Ken Johnson

I saved this Wodyetia from a foreclosed house and it has set lots of seed since. I should hit it with some Veitchia pollen.

Pretty Lignum flowers (OT :blush: )

And a young old man palm.

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Ken Johnson

Time for some weekend pictures. The first one shows my Carpoxylon that now is showing three bloom spikes!

The next is a real cool coccothrinax I got years ago. It is very slow, has a thick, beautiful woven, leaf base. I think I bought it from a palm sale at FTB. maybe from "Caribbean Palms". The third is a Borasodendron. It has been here a LONG time. I think I planted it B.A. 1992. I have several palms that were planted before Hurricane Andrew which hurled at least three tornadoes at my farm and has sustained winds of 150 MPH. Reinforced concrete was broken in my house!

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Peter Pacific
A big Foxtail that is out of the ground

And a Brahea that I just transplanted.

That´s a great Brahea (armata?) how old is it? Peter

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Peter Pacific
I have grown lots of Heteropsathe but they are slow sellers. Here is one I transplanted a few years ago. It is out of the ground but has rooted back in on the bottom. Need any seeds?

Also pictured is a close up of Gastrococos. A valuable plant for something so ugly!

When I was growing up my favorite story books were by Dr. Seuss...the Gastrococos crispa, when they mature, look like they come right out of one of his books; I love them! Peter

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Ken Johnson

Peter, MattyB thinks the Brahea may be brandegii which I would agree but I know little about them.

Here is another gastrococos.

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Ken Johnson

Here is a Coccothrinax crinita hybrid. No idea who the babies daddy is.

The second photo is a 'Carnuba Wax Palm".

The third is my breakfast fruit today!

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Ken Johnson

Here is another shot of the cool Coccothrinax.

Some of you have asked about my Pseudophoenix sergertii. here is a shot of the gang. I realy need to find a good home for them. If you come by one may end up in your truck just for visiting!

And another of my non palm plants. "White Shaving Brush"

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Jeff Searle

Ken,

Just more good stuff. It's great to see all the diversity in palms that your fooling with. But........I bet you can't show us a palm picture with it raining! WE need some!!!! Keep the pics. coming.

Jeff

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