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osideterry

Kangaroo Paws

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osideterry

I picked up this tasty thing at a pottery place in Encinitas. I had never seen one before, and the owner of the place called it a Kangaroo Paw. I like the color and think it will look nice mixed in with my palms. etc.

Anyone else growing these?

post-662-1237308128_thumb.jpg

post-662-1237308136_thumb.jpg

post-662-1237308143_thumb.jpg

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junglegalfla

I have never seen this plant before. It's very cool looking! Nice score

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John Case

There is a red one sold at Christmas around here called 'Reindeer Paws'.....

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DoomsDave

Kangaroo paw is a tough, drought-tolerant plant from Australia, which were quite the rage out here about 10-15 years ago, when hybrids started hitting the market.

They range in size from dwarfs about 6" (15 cm) tall to big ones 3 feet (1 m) tall and taller. Some have green flowers, others golden or bright red, or purplish.

I've seen some that have semi-naturalized here in foreclosed house yards, the sole survivors of previously loved gardens now getting no water.

Be careful not to overwater, as I've rotted some. Or, keep it in the pot.

Look around, there are many of them. Lowe's in particular seems to stock a lot of those.

In habitat:

596px-Kangaroo_paws_darling_range.JPG

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Kim

Anigozanthos flavidus, from Australia. Don't like wet feet! You'll be surprised how tall they can get. :)

I've seen them at that pottery place, they have the nicest selection of colors, that deep red contrasting with green is irresistible.

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cencalpalmguy

Like Dave said, take it easy on the water. I had one a few years ago that died from overwatering just on a drip system.

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MattyB

They are cool. Like others said, little to no water and the flowers stick to your clothes. I love these.

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tjwalters
There is a red one sold at Christmas around here called 'Reindeer Paws'.....

Hmm... I thought reindeer had hooves. :hmm:

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freakypalmguy

Can they handle full sun?

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osideterry

During lunch I was in Home Depot (Encinitas) looking at retaining wall blocks, and saw a guy unloading tons of these. No price tag yet, but I bet cheap. I paid $18 for that 5 gallon at Mad Potter.

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LJG

Terry the one you have is a short term perennial. Two years max. The larger ones like the reds, yellows and orange cultivars last longer. Keep cutting spent flowers to promote new growth too.

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John Case
There is a red one sold at Christmas around here called 'Reindeer Paws'.....

Hmm... I thought reindeer had hooves. :hmm:

Details, details.....

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DoomsDave
There is a red one sold at Christmas around here called 'Reindeer Paws'.....

Hmm... I thought reindeer had hooves. :hmm:

Details, details.....

They match my red Reindeer Shoes . . . . .

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tjwalters
There is a red one sold at Christmas around here called 'Reindeer Paws'.....

Hmm... I thought reindeer had hooves. :hmm:

Details, details.....

They match my red Reindeer Shoes . . . . .

Hmmm... Maybe "Reindeer Hooves" = Lithops (http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&q=lithops) :hmm:

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CromulentKevin
Can they handle full sun?

I remember seeing a bunch of different types of them at the Armstrong in temecula a couple years ago, in case you're looking for them.

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MattyB

I got a bunch from the worst garden center in the world; Lowes in La Mirada. They kill everything and then mark it down. They were originally priced as $17 ea and were dried out and almost dead so they marded them down to $4ea. I planted them and they grew great until the rabbits ate them.

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Cycadcenter

The Kangaroo Paw is the state flower of Western Australia, it is becoming a widely used plant in low water use gardens and there are several companies developing short, drought tollerant cultures which are registered as PBR plants in Oz.

here is a link to Ozbreed one of the companies involved:

Kangaroo Paws

We were actually thinking about bringing some Stage 2/3 TC plantlets but they wanted a minimum order of something like 50,000 plantlets.

Bruce

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BigFrond

I have the yellow variety and it can get pretty big. I bought one 4 years ago and divided it a couple of times. Mine got up to seven feet tall (flower spikes). These look nice at first. However, they're a pain to clean up with all the powdery flower spikes (can be itchy). I got rid on most of them except for one because of the maintainence and snails. I'm going to remove the last one from my yard this summer.

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BigFrond

BTW, a better plant would be the red hot poker. Just remember to plant them in poor soil so they don't get too big.

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Jonathan
BTW, a better plant would be the red hot poker. Just remember to plant them in poor soil so they don't get too big.

Not better - different!

The trick with Kangaroo Paws is to cut them back (foliage and all) to ground level after flowering....if you have the guts!

That way you don't get disfigured leaves from inkspot disease.

Use a brush cutter, or lawn mower, or goat, or dynamite - they're tough as nails.

Cheers,

Jonathan

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Jonathan

Forgot - they hate shade!

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Tyrone

They're native to SW of West Oz and grow around the bush areas here. These are meant to be a tough grow in the eastern states of Oz and cultivars have been developed to handle to summer rains etc they get over there (except in Melbourne). Anigozanthus flavidus originates from the south coast near Albany where it can rain all year around but still with a winter maximum. This is the one which will take watering more often and is used in the Eastern states. It has a greeny yellow flower and is a tall species. Anigozanthus manglesii is native to the Perth area and is called the Swan River Kangaroo Paw. It short and has the classic red colour. This species would be really difficult on the east coast or anywhere with summer rain. Irrigating it in summer will create inkspot disease and the eventual collapse of the plant. It needs pure infertile sand as a medium. Any clay and it's history, as it will rot real quick. I could imagine it would naturalise quite well in sandy areas of So Cal where it rains in winter, but not in summer at all. If you are going to fertilise any Australian native plants you MUST use a low phosphorus fertiliser. Australian soils are so old and worn out that they have almost no phosphorus in the soil. Australian native plants are very efficient in collecting any slight bit of phosphorus in the soil. Applying extra phosphorus with normal fertiliser will overdose them and kill them. Try to keep the manures etc off of them as that will overdose them too.

I would not think that a Kangaroo Paw would suit a palm garden unless you never water or fertilise the bed it's in. The best way to grow a Kangaroo Paw in a Mediteranean climate is to plant it in part shade to full sun in straight infertile sand and just forget it. They'll do what they'll do. In the ground they don't tend to last more than 2 or 3 years in the ground for some reason. Maybe they need a fire or something to kick them along. West Oz native plants are funny things.

Best regards

Tyrone

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Tyrone
Kangaroo paw is a tough, drought-tolerant plant from Australia, which were quite the rage out here about 10-15 years ago, when hybrids started hitting the market.

They range in size from dwarfs about 6" (15 cm) tall to big ones 3 feet (1 m) tall and taller. Some have green flowers, others golden or bright red, or purplish.

I've seen some that have semi-naturalized here in foreclosed house yards, the sole survivors of previously loved gardens now getting no water.

Be careful not to overwater, as I've rotted some. Or, keep it in the pot.

Look around, there are many of them. Lowe's in particular seems to stock a lot of those.

In habitat:

596px-Kangaroo_paws_darling_range.JPG

Dave that's exactly what the bush looks like here. I see by the tag on the photo that it's in the Darling Range. The Darling Range is a large hill network that runs parralel with the coast for hundreds of miles right past Perth and is the edge of the Australian continental plain at approx 900ft elevation. Below this is the Swan coastal plain which Perth and the suburbs sit on. In bush areas on the coastal plain there are still many Kangaroo paws. Through these areas you'll see countless Macrozamia reidlii cycads some quite ancient too, as well as Xanthorea (Grass Trees or politically incorrect Black Boys) and Kingias.

Best regards

Tyrone

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Jonathan
....they don't tend to last more than 2 or 3 years in the ground for some reason. Maybe they need a fire or something to kick them along. West Oz native plants are funny things.

Best regards

Tyrone

Tyrone,

you're dead right about sand, etc, but they seem to last for ever in the ground down here, if in full sun....at least the wild type does. I know of one planting near a beach in Hobart that is at least 20 years old.

I don't think the new small 'designer' varieties are as tough, at least here.

I suspect that cutting them back to ground level has the same stimulating effect as fire and results in vigorous, disease free new growth.

Heres an interesting link on pruning them, Kangaroo Paws

I've found a little bit of blood and bone dosn't hurt them too much.....the Proteacea family are the real worry with fertilisers - I've killed more Proteas, Banksias and Dryandra's than I've had chicken dinners!

Cheers,

Jonathan

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Tyrone

Jonathan I was doing a bit of reading and I think A manglesii which is the common one in the bush here is considered a short lived perrenial. Probably 2 or 3 years at the max. A flavidus which is the taller one probably lives longer. Down in Albany you see the tall ones growing in margins along drains and creek areas, but always in old ancient gutless sand.

Albany's sand is horrible. Even though they get regular rain down there, the sand is water repellant in areas, so much so, that if you dig a hole of some size and fill it with water a number of times, it doesn't drain very fast, and even if you use a wetting agent, and refill the hole over a one hour period a number of times, then go back to inspect it by scraping the side of the hole, the water has only penetrated one inch and beneath that moist layer it's all dry sand again. Very frustrating. The ground down there needs to be ripped up and amended with heaps of compost to start working properly if you want to do some serious gardening.

Best regards

Tyrone

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Jonathan

Tyrone,

I think the common ones down here must be flavidus, by the sounds of it.

Its funny, that sand you described in Albany...I've got 23 acres of it!!!

It behaves exactly how you describe it....maybe not quite as extreme.

One thing I have found is that because the sand particles are so fine, that finely screened compost worked into the soil has very little effect and tends to compact down along with the sand when you water it.

I'm thinking of getting some unscreened compost with big (up to 50mm or more) chunks in it to try to open the soil structure up a bit. I'm a bit worried about nitrogen loss as the bigger bits break down, but can ammend with fertiliser to compensate.

What do you think?

Cheers,

Jonathan

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Walter John

I used to have stacks of these growing at home, then I got into palms, palms block the sun, the kangaroo paws won't live this way, the palms ran them out of town basically.

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Tyrone
Tyrone,

I think the common ones down here must be flavidus, by the sounds of it.

Its funny, that sand you described in Albany...I've got 23 acres of it!!!

It behaves exactly how you describe it....maybe not quite as extreme.

One thing I have found is that because the sand particles are so fine, that finely screened compost worked into the soil has very little effect and tends to compact down along with the sand when you water it.

I'm thinking of getting some unscreened compost with big (up to 50mm or more) chunks in it to try to open the soil structure up a bit. I'm a bit worried about nitrogen loss as the bigger bits break down, but can ammend with fertiliser to compensate.

What do you think?

Cheers,

Jonathan

The big compost idea sounds like a good one. Throw some seaweed in there if you can get some.

Best regards

Tyrone

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8er-moni

Hi!

Yesterday I got a big pot with Anigozanthos flavidus - grown from seeds in Germany; I hope, the plant will be "happy" with me :winkie:

Thankyou for your infos in this thread ....

DSC07226.jpg

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palmcurry

I really like these. There are some nice yellow ones here in Capo beach at seaside growers that I'm gonne bag as soon as my yard is ready. Nice in your face color.

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Justin

These used to grow pretty well for me with minimal effort, very similar to my Proteas. I say "use to" not because the plants died from natural causes, but because the rabbits absolutely loved these. If you plant them, make sure to put a rabbit cage around them, at least when they are small.

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bahia

My experience with the various taller growing Anigozanthus flavidus cultivars is that they aren't nearly as touchy about summer irrigation and clay soils as long as they are planted in full sun and have good air circulation. If you have poorly drained clay soil, they can be sensitive to rotting out in winter. I usually plant them on slopes or mounds and amend the soil if clay, and use drip irrigation in preference to spray irrigation so the foliage doesn't get wet in summer. Ink Spot disease is almost unavoidable on older plants, but if they get the full sun and good air circulation, they will mostly outgrow it once the temps warm up again in the spring. They greatly benefit from a good thinning out to remove diseased foliage and old spent flowering stems, and they benefit greatly if baited against slugs and snails here in northern California. They are phenomenal for up to 10 months of colorful bloom if happy, and I have had them thrive for up to 8 years in combination with other things like the Leucadendrons, Leucospermums, Isopogons and Grevilleas. Low levels of time release Osmocote fertilizer seem to do them no harm in my experience.

Interesting to hear that they are so attractive to rabbits; fortunately they don't seem equally attractive to gophers and moles here, which are much more common than rabbits. With our wetter winters, snails can also do quite a bit of damage. I've heard that in Australia the preferred method to keep Ink Spot disease under control is to use a flame torch and burn off all the old foliage in late winter. Cutting them back hard probably serves the same purpose.

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8er-moni

Do you know how to use the layers, which are growing at the blossom peduncle from the last year?

Should I wait für roots while they are growing at the "mother" ... or cut them and put in soil now ... or put them in a glass of water to take roots?

DSC07234.jpg

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bahia

I've never had any of my Anigozanthus flavidus form plantlets along the old flowering stem like your plant shows. Very interesting to see. I doubt that it will be inclined to form roots in place, but I'd suggest letting it get more fully formed before separating it and planting it in a well drained soil mix. It would tend to rot out if you tried to root this in water, unless you were using a hydroponic system.

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Tassie_Troy1971

Hi Terry

My partners grandparents have just about every Kangaroo paw there is , i will take some pics next time i visit ok.

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8er-moni

Thanks, Bahia!

OK, I will wait with separating and I hope, that it will show roots :winkie:

I will inform you, if and how it works :lol:

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palmmermaid

I did manage to notice these on the new gardening show with Jamie Drurie on HGTV. That's when I wasn't ogling the star of the show and listening to his Aussie accent. He uses a lot of Australian plants in his California landscape makeovers. I have been on the lookout for these here in Florida to add to my succulent garden - Kangaroo paws, not Jamie!

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bahia

Kitty,

I don't think that any of the Anigozanthus species will do as well in high summer heat and humidity conditions of Florida without extra pampering. I'd think that the Inkspot disease in particular would be more of an issue with higher summer humidity. I am willing to bet that they are probably best treated as a winter annual for containers in your location, and maybe you can get them to survive a summer if given excellent air circulation and good drainage, and a location with bright light but not excessive heat. I would guess that if you can get Agapanthus to grow and bloom for you, you might have a chance with Anigozanthus flavidus cultivars/hybrids, which are much more broadly tolerant in garden conditions that some of the other species.

In fact, a lot of the dwarfer hybrids here in California are probably annuals for containers for most casual gardeners, and tend to rot out and/or dry out over the meadium term. As they are mass produced in full bloom for the Home Depots and Costco stores, they are cheap enough to use as temporary color. They can be touchy about lack of water or staying too wet as container plants, and I have much better success with them in my own garden when planted in the ground with minimal drip irrigation.

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