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cfkingfish

Sabal miamiensis

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cfkingfish

Outside of Florida this palm is probably never talked about, even amongst collectors. I found one growing in a collector's yard and took some attention to it as it was seeding. This palm was described by Scott Zona in the 90's I believe as being distinct from palmetto and etonia. Personally, I CAN see the differences between it and similar Sabals. It has about 2 feet of unclear trunk with a compact crown - S. etonia seems to have a very loose crown in the specimens I have come across. The leaves are costapalmate to the point that the segments overlap towards the middle, as shown in the picture. The seed is the larges Sabal seed I have seen, though ovoid in shape and not spherical.

The history of this palm is sad to say the least. According to the Encyclopedia, Riffle stated the natural range of this palm was from the coastal areas of Ft. Lauderdale down to the Coconut Grove area of Miami. This is obviously built to the hilt today, so the habitat is gone. The specimen pictured was offspring of a plant growing in a private area of southern Broward County and was collected by a well known palm lover who contributed many pictures to the Encyclopedia. Is anyone growing a palm under this name, or familar with the story/can add to it?

DSCF0570.jpg

Here is the extreme costapalmate leaf typical of the plant:

DSCF0571.jpg

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cfkingfish

Bump......no one knows any more info?  :(

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Jeff Searle

Can I ask who's garden this palm is planted in? Well of course I can ask, just curious thats all. BTW, I don't have any in my collection.

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cfkingfish

Jeff-

I would be happy to tell, but the owner wishes to remain anonymous. All I can say is it is over here on the "West Coast", and the plant was purchased from Chuck Hubbach about 15 years ago.

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Jeff Searle

Fair enough...is his initials J.H.?  :)

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BigWaveDave

There is a sabal labeled miamiensis at the Quail Botanical gardens, I might have a picture.

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Gileno Machado

Nice Sabal. Long thin petioles at this stage, and lovely twisting fronds.

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Walt

I've read up a little on Sabal miamiensis. Seems it's very similar to Sabal etonia.

Living on the east side of the Lake Wales Ridge, Sabal etonia abound on my property (only Serenoa repens are more abundant).

I've owned my current property for just over eight years. In that time I've observed marked differences in growth and form with regard to both my Sable palmetto and Sabal etonia.

I'm almost convinced I may have a hybrid cross between the two species.

When I first moved here I didn't even know what a Sabal etonia was  (I was only familar with S. palmetto). I saw all these small, trunkless palms on my property and just assumed they were juvenile S. palmetto (I knew the difference between S. palmetto and S. repens). Then, as the years went by, some of these palms started to grow far more than others. It was then I learned about S. etonia, and that they stay trunkless.

All my non trunked S. palmetto never produce inflorescense, but S. etonia does.

And as Zona et al say, S. etonia only has two ranks of inflorescence branches off the peduncle, whereas S. palmetto has three.

This has me puzzled as I have at least one, what heretofore I thought was a S. etonia that flowers and produces seed each year, yet it is untrunked and produces three ranks of branches. This palm as virtually stayed the same size in all these years, yet, what were once smaller S. palmetto, have grown much larger.

Photo #1: The palm to the left is Cocothrinax elegans, disregard that. The sable to the right is the palm in question that bares flowers and seed each year on three ranks of inflorescence branching. Note that it almost appears to be developing a trunk. This palm is in a clump of S. etonia. All the others have two ranks of branching.

2284785920042496162mzrHah_th.jpg

by waltcat100

Photo #2: This is a reverse shot of Photo #1. The sable is question is to the extreme left.

2830512990042496162SEJqeI_th.jpg

by waltcat100

Photo#3: This is another Sabal etonia I have, which is of more upright form (most of them are far more lax, in that their petioles lie on a much greater angle from the vertical. This S. etonia is one of my largest ones, yet it's always been this size since I've lived here. It flowers and seeds each year.

2605067550042496162hnkpwX_th.jpg

by waltcat100

Photo #4: This is a typical lax Sabal etonia, with a far less dense crown than say Sable palmetto. This particular palm as always been this size since I've lived here.

2184438630042496162wBYvyf_th.jpg

by waltcat100

Photo#5: This palm, when I first moved here, was about the same size as the S. etonia in Photo#4. But about two years after moving here I started to notice this palm growing more, which today is obviously a small Sabal palmetto. This palm has never produces an inflorescence, not have several more of the same size.

2451231350042496162onUkAT_th.jpg

by waltcat100

Conclusion: It seems all of my untrunked Sabal palmettos are to juvenile to produce inflorescence. Only Sabal etonia produces inflorescence with no trunk. Yet, I still have this one untrunked sabal that produces inflorescence (with three ranks of branching) but does not grow in stature, otherwise. This leads me to believe it may be a hybrid of sorts.

I found a colony of miniture sabals that I once thought were trunked Sabal etonia, but I now think they are diminutive due to environmental conditions. I plan to check them out to see if their inflorescence has two or three ranks of branching the next time I get a chance to view them.

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BS Man about Palms

VERY cool looking Sabal. Normally, I just go for the giant frond versions, but that frond is so unique, kind of like praying hands.  Pretty slick.

Bill

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cfkingfish

Jeff-

Sorry, the initials aren't J.H.  :P

It is good to see there is another specimen growing in a protected area. I collected some seed and I am going to see if I can't spread the plant around a bit more.

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BS Man about Palms

(cfkingfish @ Oct. 20 2006,07:46)

QUOTE
Jeff-

Sorry, the initials aren't J.H.  :P

It is good to see there is another specimen growing in a protected area. I collected some seed and I am going to see if I can't spread the plant around a bit more.

ummm, interested party here... :D

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Gileno Machado

Amigo Christiano:

I wouldn't mind showing here the picture of another specimen in some 3 years, with GM initials on it...  :cool:

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paulgila

quail has a large collection of interesting sabal,i had kind of forgotten...

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Zac in NC

Well, heres a bump. Thats a neat looking Sabal and one we don't see pictured very often. Thanks for sharing this one Christian.

Zac

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