Jump to content
buffy

Silver Queen

Recommended Posts

tank

I have a few of these, from RPS seed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
stevethegator

Interested to see how these would do in N. FL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alicehunter2000

Yes....I'm not convinced any Queen can survive 20 degrees F. for several hours unscathed, let alone 15 degrees.

We always hear all the hype and hoopla concerning this "Silver Queen" but I have yet to see a single example of an adult palm surviving reliably and without severe damage in zones 8b-9a (15-20F multiple hours).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
_Keith

Yes....I'm not convinced any Queen can survive 20 degrees F. for several hours unscathed, let alone 15 degrees.

We always hear all the hype and hoopla concerning this "Silver Queen" but I have yet to see a single example of an adult palm surviving reliably and without severe damage in zones 8b-9a (15-20F multiple hours).

I have one that has handled 19 as an ultimate low with several hours around the 20 degree mark. It did not even completely defoliate this year,and is recovering nicely. It has around 8 feet of clear trunk this year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tank

I have a queen at my old house in Gainesville purchased at Lowes on sale for $5 that I planted out in 2008. It has taken some hits but has never been defoliated and currently looks like a well grown queen. It saw around 17F in 2010.

Disclaimer, I am about to show a picture of queen palm:

post-526-0-60666300-1404760140_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
stevethegator

I think the hardiest queen forms from southern, elevated areas of South America can survive around 15F, because apparently they do so in habitat (not sure about defoliation, since 15F is near record low for the area I imagine they do get damaged). Aside form the elevation, the climate is fairly similar to N. FL due to equivalent latitude, eastern side of the content, transition between tropical and temperate, etc.

The question is, are the "Silver Queens" really progeny of those hardiest of queen forms? Are there even seeds from those forms available anywhere? Even if there are, individual genetics vary so there's no guarantee a queen seedling from a hardy parent would be equally hardy, or that a seedling from a more tender parent would't be hardier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alicehunter2000

The question is, are the "Silver Queens" really progeny of those hardiest of queen forms? Are there even seeds from those forms available anywhere? Even if there are, individual genetics vary so there's no guarantee a queen seedling from a hardy parent would be equally hardy, or that a seedling from a more tender parent would't be hardier.

The million dollar question.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Collectorpalms

I have Syagrus purchased as Silver Queens from the Rio Grande Valley as 10 gallon plants planted around 2001 that have survived in Zone 8b. I also have some grown as Var Litoralis. They have seen lows of 15.5, 17 and below 32 for 3 days and this past year with a heavy ice storm and one day high of 30. The ice did the most damage as it was a late march event. I only know of one other Syagrus left in zone 8b in Texas after the hard freezes of 2010,2011, and 2014.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ErikSJI

Do you have a photo of this queen in question that has survived these storms? I would like to compare to the other photos I have seen of these queens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alicehunter2000

A little bit more on how badly damaged after these lows would be helpful as well.

Now we are mid summer I have noticed some queens are starting to come back around the Northwest Florida coastal area's. This is after complete defoliation. Can you truly call something hardy when it barely survives?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Collectorpalms

Yes, I do have some updated pictures, just not able to upload them right now. I am sure that I have posted them online here before.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
stevethegator

A little bit more on how badly damaged after these lows would be helpful as well.

Now we are mid summer I have noticed some queens are starting to come back around the Northwest Florida coastal area's. This is after complete defoliation. Can you truly call something hardy when it barely survives?

Palms like Washingtonia grow back so fast after their near death experiences that some people use them like deciduous trees at the edges of their range (at least in the South). Other palms can get comparatively minor damage and take several seasons to recover.

I've seen damaged queens take awhile to recover so I'd say they are not hardy in areas where they're heavily damaged annually. However, I still hold out hopes for the hardiest forms since it gets colllld in areas where they grow naturally

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
buffy

Hi Y'all: About the time this thread started, Nigel was kind enough to provide me with seeds of Syagrus "Mountain Giant". I'm sure they'd get tougher with a big trunk, but I haven't had any luck with them. I've tried to grow them to some size before putting them in the ground, but size hasn't helped them. I lost one last year to a wet 17F that was close to trunking. I just put my last 7 gallon plant in the ground next to the house on the east side of the house in hopes that it might work out. I just don't think it's viable with 8B winters. They're not terribly frost tolerant either. Perhaps there's a truely cold hardy queen, but I haven't seen one. Also, they would cough up their spear for anything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ErikSJI

It would be impressive to see one like the photos Nigel has showed us of the one in habitat. I have yet to see any difference from seeds from these queens compared to just your garden variety. I am sure it will take time but I am doubtful.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
_Keith

As I recall someone last year posted about collecting some queen seeds for a colder region.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alicehunter2000

Perhaps there's a truely cold hardy queen, but I haven't seen one.

I have yet to see any difference from seeds from these queens compared to just your garden variety. I am sure it will take time but I am doubtful.

Guess I'm not the only "Cold Hardy Queen Doubting Thomas"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ErikSJI

I do not believe the hype. If I did I would have planted a field of them to do hybrids. For one. I only see one large queen palm that this seed source is from. Not 1000s in the habitat. You can collect seeds all day in a cold region. I have doubts that any off springs will be just as cold hardy in alternate regions of the world.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
_Keith

I do not believe the hype. If I did I would have planted a field of them to do hybrids. For one. I only see one large queen palm that this seed source is from. Not 1000s in the habitat. You can collect seeds all day in a cold region. I have doubts that any off springs will be just as cold hardy in alternate regions of the world.

Well, mathematically speaking, some would.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The7thLegend

I have a juvenile 6ft Litoralis Queen but the jury is still out. Been through 18 degrees but with a blanket. We'll see....

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alicehunter2000

Eric you ever backcross any mules with queen pollen? Is the result a cold hardier queen lookalike?

BTW. ....look at the number of hits this thread has.....just a little bit of interest in this topic.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ErikSJI

Photo of 3 gallon butyagrus x syagrus. Mine died on San Juan Island WA zone 8b. Most of them were given away. I have not heard how they are doing.

post-1930-0-57470300-1405361000_thumb.jp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ErikSJI

As you can see the trunk is thinner then our typical 3 gallon Mules.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tropicdoc

OOOOOOOOOOOH! butyagrus backcross! Should be nice. Do the fronds appear to have a plumose leaflets?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cikas

I have 5 Queen palms of Litoralis form ( they are very young, still on strap leafs ), and two young normal Queen palms. It will be interesting to see differences as they grow.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alicehunter2000

So Eric....any backcross mules for sale?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
JimR

Any updates on the search for a cold hardier queen?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Laaz

I got some of the Uruguay seedlings from Tom that are doing great here with no damage.   http://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?/topic/41077-uruguay-queen-palm/

 

I am also growing some of the Hardy Charleston queens, which I believe are the most northerly fruiting queens on the east coast.     http://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?/topic/50980-a-hardy-charleston-garden/

 

 

Edited by Laaz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...