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Ceroxylon quindiuense

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Bags

This is one of my new favorite palms, but It seams like there are not many mature ones around in SoCal. I am hoping this is because not many have tried it rather than they all have died. I am hopefull it will do well for me along the coast in SoCal. Please post any pics or info you have on this palm.

Here is the palm I just purchased. It is a five gallon

Ceroxylon031.jpg

Love the silvery underside of the leafs.

Ceroxylon032.jpg

Edited by Bags

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Bags

Here are some pics I found on the internet. Taken by CARITO PABÓN

454px-Ceroxylon_quindiuense_3.png

This is a pic off of Dave's Garden and at the Huntington Botanical gardens. I would think the climate in San Diego would be much better for this palm than there and this one looks perfect.

palmbob_1080258502_764.jpg

Edited by Bags

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Jeff in St Pete

Bags, great score! Do you know where the picture from the internet was taken? Those ringed trunks are beautiful!

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Bags

Those trunks are amazing. I have not seen one in person, but I hear they have a thick coat of wax. The person who took the pic is from Columbia so I am assuming that is were the palms are. Aaron

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Bennz

I have about 1000 C. quindiuense seedlings, I find them by far the easiest of the Ceroxylon species to maintain. Most of the others seem to die in nursery for no obvious reason. C. alpinum and ventricosum are next easiest for me.

I suspect the San Diego climate may be a little on the dry side for a palm coming from areas with minimum 100inch rainfall... possibly some ethical issues about water use and resource allocation there...!

I still think of these palms doing best in cool climates, night times around 10C max, daytimes rarely over 25C. I would think better suited to SF Bay climate than SD. Better again in Hawaii above 2000 feet. There are some very nice apecimens in NZ, but still much more rare than I would like. I want them to naturalise here!!

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Jeff in St Pete
Those trunks are amazing. I have not seen one in person, but I hear they have a thick coat of wax. The person who took the pic is from Columbia so I am assuming that is were the palms are. Aaron

Thanks Aaron. I know that I couldn't grow them here where I live, but I wonder if they would grow in the higher mountains of Costa Rica.

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Bags

Bennz,

It sounds like San Fransisco is the ideal climate for this palm, but where I live is very mild as well. The coldest month January has an average low of 44F (6.6C) and the warmest month August has an average high of 82F (27.7C). I think the temperature is fine. The biggest problem might be the Sana Ana winds we have in october and november. The humidity is often below 10% wich is not good for most palms and probably not good at all for a Ceroxylon.

Jeff,

It would be great to see some down in Costa Rica. I have some property in Bahia De Lagato in the north and if I do ever build a house down there it will definately be a palm paradise.

Any one in SoCal have any thoughts on this one?

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JasonD

Here's a beautiful little Ceroxylon alpinum in a San Francisco garden. They have the most gorgeous foliage of the cultivated Bay Area Ceroxylons when young.

Ceroxylon quindiuense does very well in the fog zones of the Bay Area -- areas where the ocean fog creeps in most nights of the summer, keeping temperatures below 60F/15C at night and humidity high. So do C. vogelianum, C. parvifrons, C. parvum, and the above, C. alpinum. The San Francisco Botanical Garden in Golden Gate Park (AKA Strybing Arboretum) has two gigantic juvenile quindios at 40ft (12+ meters) overall height, plus a juvenile C. vogelianum at 25ft. Extremely slow to develop trunk, but then very quick to rise up once they do.

Ceroxylon parvifrons and C. parvum have perhaps the best potential as garden plants here as they are small (a bit smaller than an Archontophoenix cunninghamiana) and develop trunk much faster than their mammoth cousins, and C. parvifrons, at least, is quite tolerant of even our most miserably cold and windy districts near the ocean, looking flawless.

post-1532-1225132340_thumb.jpg

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PalmGuyWC

Hi Jason,

Nice to see you pitch in. You know San Francisco and what grows there much better than I do. How about giving us a tour of the palms of San Francisco? Maybe Darold Petty could help to. I know there is a lot hidden away that we don't know about. To bad we don't have more Palm Society members in the City.

Dick

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Patrick

I second that!

It would be great to see some gems out there from SF!!

I know that there are some great Ceroxylons out at the palmatum in Oakland, but I don't have any pics., unfortunately. They must have 15 feet of trunk, or so....

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Shon

Aaron I have a large 5 gallon as well. I think it will be the oppisite of most of our palms here in So Cal in that it will do better in winter than in summer. That picture of the one at the Huntington seems pretty well canopied. I got one spot that stays pretty wet and shady most of the time and that's where it is going to go this spring.

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Bags

Shon has yours been outside more than a year and if so how is it looking? It seems like a good canopy may be the key to keeping this one looking good. Anyone else? Bill I know you have some. how are they doing?

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JakeK

Ceroxylon quindiuense is one of my favorite palms and surprisingly does quite well as a houseplant too. I've had mine for 4 years now.

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JasonD

Here's the oldest Ceroxylon parvifrons I'm aware of in California. It's in San Francisco, less than a mile from the ocean, and thus subject to quite chilly summer temperatures. Weeks will go by out there in July or August when the temperature stays below 65F and the sky remains overcast. The wind blows 10-25 miles per hour much of the day from March until October, and winter gales can be intense. Humidity rarely drops below 60%.

The palm is beautifully cared-for and accompanied by much younger specimens planted together and intended to eventually produce a seed crop for horticulture. This species includes Ceroxylon utile in synonymy. C. utile had been thought to grow as high as 13,000 feet above sea level, but I believe Spanner and Gibbons visited the locale and debunked the idea. Nonetheless, they found C. parvifrons above 10,000 feet. Pretty chilly there, even on the Equator. It's a perfect size for home gardens and for growing as a street tree. I would love to see this planted in quantity in coastal California (maybe even Oregon). Probably not very drought-tolerant, alas.

post-1532-1225238620_thumb.jpg

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JasonD

Trunks of Ceroxylon vogelianum (planted around 1984 as C. hexandrum, now in synonymy) at the Oakland Palmetum at the Lakeside Garden Center on Lake Merritt in Oakland, California. Sorry for the poor quality of these photos, taken last winter. Crown shots to follow.

Climate there is milder than near the ocean: Most summer days reach 70F, dipping below 60F almost every night. Occasional dry heat waves can push the thermometer up into the 80-95 range but rarely for longer than four days. Ocean fog or overcast rolls in almost every night from May until October, keeping things humid at night.

post-1532-1225241039_thumb.jpg

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JasonD

Same Ceroxylon vogelianums' crowns -- atrocious photo, sorry

post-1532-1225241086_thumb.jpg

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JasonD

OK, one last picture...the same Ceroxylon parvifrons but with Parajubaea cocoides in the frame. High-altitude Andean friends.

post-1532-1225242181_thumb.jpg

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JEFF from Trabuco Canyon CA

Very nice pictures Jason! Thanks for sharing. :)

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BS Man about Palms
Shon has yours been outside more than a year and if so how is it looking? It seems like a good canopy may be the key to keeping this one looking good. Anyone else? Bill I know you have some. how are they doing?

Aaron, as it has been alluded to in the past here, they don't like the dry heat much, I have had good luck once they are at big 5 gal size with full coastal sun. But prior to that half day shade is the best. I also think a loose daining soil works best until 15 gal size, because when its dry and hot, you want to keep watering them because they look rough compared to winter, at the same time, the soil tends to be too wet if its too heavy.

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Al in Kona

Pauleen Sullivan had a very large size Ceroxylon growing in Ventura, California. I assume it is still there - it had a lot of trunk showing. Has anyone been there to see it in recent years? Ventura has a cool coastal climate so I could see why it might do well there.

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Mark_NoVA

Love those pictures of the C. parvifrons by the house in San Francisco, and of the path-lining C. quindiuense. Looked it up, I guess you all know this, tallest palm in the world! From 6-10,000 feet in the Andes. Do you think either would survive right next to the ocean in Seattle? (Have a friend there re-landscaping right now.)

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Bennz
OK, one last picture...the same Ceroxylon parvifrons but with Parajubaea cocoides in the frame. High-altitude Andean friends.

Beautiful palms. The gracefullness of the Ceroxylon strongly contrasting with the chunkier form of the Parajubaea.

I cant wait to get my C. quindiuense up to some size. Looking forward to 1000 of them in one valley....

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Peter

Here's Pauleen's. I probably have some better photos but can't put my hands on them right now:

IMG_3899.jpg

IMG_3889.jpg

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JasonD

What an amazing tree. I've read that hers is a C. ventricosum.

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Eric in Orlando
Here's the oldest Ceroxylon parvifrons I'm aware of in California. It's in San Francisco, less than a mile from the ocean, and thus subject to quite chilly summer temperatures. Weeks will go by out there in July or August when the temperature stays below 65F and the sky remains overcast. The wind blows 10-25 miles per hour much of the day from March until October, and winter gales can be intense. Humidity rarely drops below 60%.

The palm is beautifully cared-for and accompanied by much younger specimens planted together and intended to eventually produce a seed crop for horticulture. This species includes Ceroxylon utile in synonymy. C. utile had been thought to grow as high as 13,000 feet above sea level, but I believe Spanner and Gibbons visited the locale and debunked the idea. Nonetheless, they found C. parvifrons above 10,000 feet. Pretty chilly there, even on the Equator. It's a perfect size for home gardens and for growing as a street tree. I would love to see this planted in quantity in coastal California (maybe even Oregon). Probably not very drought-tolerant, alas.

Thats a nice specimen, almost looks like an Archontophoenix with a waxy trunk.

Is that a tall Trachycarpus wagnerianus next to it? 2 palms you never see in central or SoFL.

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Eric in Orlando
Here are some pics I found on the internet. Taken by CARITO PABÓN

454px-Ceroxylon_quindiuense_3.png

This is a pic off of Dave's Garden and at the Huntington Botanical gardens. I would think the climate in San Diego would be much better for this palm than there and this one looks perfect.

palmbob_1080258502_764.jpg

Is that 1st photo from the botanic garden in Bogota? My girlfriend went to Colombia last year to see family and went to the BG. She had photos and there were Ceroxylon there, kind of looked like that in the photo.

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Bags

Thanks for the info Bill. And thanks for the pics. Pauleen's palm is amazing. I think this palm in my opinion may have the best looking trunk in the palm world. Where a lot of palm's trunks turn brown as they age these seem to keep the white waxy trunk for a long time. Aaron

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ghar41

Ceroxylon quinduense can be found in the San Francisco bay area in Golden Gate Park at the Strybring botanical collection.

There are also excellent examples at the Lakeside Palmetum in Oakland. Note the size of the clipboard leaning against this "seedling."

post-376-1225396564_thumb.jpg

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ghar41

But the best example I know of is at Inge Hoffman's wonderful collection in San Leandro. This palm sits just a few feet from a massive Caryota Gigas. It is the only one I've ever seen that is showing trunk.

post-376-1225396717_thumb.jpg

post-376-1225396772_thumb.jpg

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garrin

I recognize the ceroxylons along the pathway -- it is the Bogota Botanic Garden. A very hospitable IPS member in Bogota took me there in around 1982, and he was proudly pointing out those palms which had just been planted as 18 in. tall youngsters. So the growth rate there in their natural habitat is almost exactly the same as in the San Franciso Bay Area.

Another place that has ceroxylons thriving is right here in Hawai'i on the slopes of Mauna Loa at about 4000ft. I gave seedling C. alpinum to a few friends who live there and they are thriving and really beautiful.

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Carlo Morici

Beautiful pics. Ceroxylon species are definitely worth a try. They are attractive since they are young, surely because of the silvery underleaf. And they seem quite finicky about climate, so you will never know how will they go until you try. There are two species growing at the Palmetum in Tenerife. One is C.alpinum, the other is a C.sp.lost tag, still about 1-1,5 m tall. The palmetum is probably too hot and coastal for many species, but these two are going ahead. I wish we had a quindiuense to try... maybe somewhere uphill...?

Carlo

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Eric in Orlando

That one at Pauleen Sullivan's is cool as all, those waxy trunks are striking. If that was here it would be a lightning rod.

Here is maybe the only Ceroxylon growing in FL, C. parvum. I planted it in May 2007. It is still healthy but slow so it has made it through 2 of our summers. It is currently openeing a healthy new leaf. I planted C. amazonicum also but it did not survive. This photo is from June;

Ceroxylon parvum in Orlando,FL

img_1765.jpg

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PalmGuyWC

With the exception of Paullene's Ceroxylon growing in Ventura Ca, which must be the tallest one in the USA, the San Francisco Bay area seems to be the only place in the continental USA where they are successfully grown. They grow in S. Cal. until a Santa Anna reduces them to a pile of charred fronds. Ceroxylons have very narrow temperature requirements and particularly when they are young.

Dick

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ghar41
With the exception of Paullene's Ceroxylon growing in Ventura Ca, which must be the tallest one in the USA, the San Francisco Bay area seems to be the only place in the continental USA where they are successfully grown. They grow in S. Cal. until a Santa Anna reduces them to a pile of charred fronds. Ceroxylons have very narrow temperature requirements and particularly when they are young.

Dick

I have had no luck at all with Ceroxylon's here. Jeff gave me a nice C. alpinum awhile back and I watched it go into slow decline. Spider mites destroy my seedlings. I have one C. vogelianum seedling that looks ok.

If anyone makes a visit to Strybring Botanical garden in Golden Gate Park, take some pictures of the C quienduense that are there. I'm really curious to see what they look like now.

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Mark_NoVA

That's interesting--how far from the ocean is that property? In Ventura there can be a big fog difference in the summer depending on distance from the ocean and altitude (i.e. on a hill or not).

With the exception of Paullene's Ceroxylon growing in Ventura Ca, which must be the tallest one in the USA, the San Francisco Bay area seems to be the only place in the continental USA where they are successfully grown. They grow in S. Cal. until a Santa Anna reduces them to a pile of charred fronds. Ceroxylons have very narrow temperature requirements and particularly when they are young.

Dick

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avb

I have had one Ceroxylon in the ground for about 10 years. I don't know the species, but it has been mostly trouble-free except for one bout with crown rot early on. I also have quindiuense and alpinum growing for about four years. The alpinum is definitely the fastest of the three. I live about four miles from the ocean where it stays cool most days without the blazing and blasting Santa Ana's that some areas get. I try to keep them out of direct sun by placing potted plants around to give them dappled light. I tried hexandrum and vogelanium but they did not survive. The first one is now about 7 feet over all, the alpinum about 4 feet, and the quindiuense is still a seedling at about 2 feet. All were started as liner size.

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Rafael

How about pictures updating?

I am about to join the ceroxylon owners! :drool:

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Jason Baker Portugal

I have 5 C. quindiuense and I agree that they grow twice as fast in shade as opposed to light shade when they are seedlings. They are also very sensative to over fertilizing. Other than that I have parvum (slower), amazonica (very fast) and tiny ventricosum seedlings. I think that they grow in the forest (shade) in their natural habitat and that is why they are becoming scarce in the wild: the trees are cut down, they leave the big palms but these cannot regenerate because they need shade as seedlings and one day they will be gone. My 5cents. Jason

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Tyrone

I have 5 C. quindiuense and I agree that they grow twice as fast in shade as opposed to light shade when they are seedlings. They are also very sensative to over fertilizing. Other than that I have parvum (slower), amazonica (very fast) and tiny ventricosum seedlings. I think that they grow in the forest (shade) in their natural habitat and that is why they are becoming scarce in the wild: the trees are cut down, they leave the big palms but these cannot regenerate because they need shade as seedlings and one day they will be gone. My 5cents. Jason

Jason, it's very sad, but I think you're right.

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Zayin

Hey there, here are two Ceroxylon's that someone has successfully grown in KeriKeri New Zealand. Both a C.quindiuense and a C.Parvifrons. its at South Seas palm nursery. Not the best pictures but I was surprised to see how large the Parvifrons was (its the one with the trunk). I am trying to grown C.Ventricosum, and bought some seeds as they aren't available here in canada. Amazing how easy they are to germinate.

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