Jump to content
smile

Borassus flabellifer

Recommended Posts

Kris

Dear Peter :)

Finally i see life,many B.F seeds were sent to our forum friends...but i think you were the first to reach this stage in this years batch ! Great work.:greenthumb:

Hope the same trend continues and these seedlings turn into big sized palms in the years to come.:winkie:

Wishing you all the best,

Lots of love,

kris :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wai`anae Steve

Dear Peter :)

Finally i see life,many B.F seeds were sent to our forum friends...but i think you were the first to reach this stage in this years batch ! Great work.:greenthumb:

Hope the same trend continues and these seedlings turn into big sized palms in the years to come.:winkie:

Wishing you all the best,

Lots of love,

kris :)

No sign of green here in Hawaii. I notice that Peter's seed is at ground level while I thought they were to be burried deep?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Peter Pacific

Dear Peter :)

Finally i see life,many B.F seeds were sent to our forum friends...but i think you were the first to reach this stage in this years batch ! Great work.:greenthumb:

Hope the same trend continues and these seedlings turn into big sized palms in the years to come.:winkie:

Wishing you all the best,

Lots of love,

kris :)

No sign of green here in Hawaii. I notice that Peter's seed is at ground level while I thought they were to be burried deep?

Hi Steve, actually I planted all of my Borassus seeds fairly shallow (I didn't want the first leaf to rot before it reached the surface). I also noticed how Kris had his planted and he's an expert! This one that has the first leaf showing gets more water than the rest and this is the first one to show a leaf. goood luck, Peter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmatierMeg

Well, it seems like months have passed since I placed an update for the Borassus seedling but it's only been three weeks! Time flies when you're having fun!

The seedling has nearly doubled in size since the last post and this is the only one of the eight I have in my garden that is sending up a leaf.

regards to all, Peter

post-2997-12707695590134_thumb.jpg

Good going, Peter. My germinated seed was buried shallowly, so I'm not sure if it survived my awful winter, esp. the near-freezing rain on Jan. 9. And I'm afraid to look.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wai`anae Steve

Dear Peter :)

Finally i see life,many B.F seeds were sent to our forum friends...but i think you were the first to reach this stage in this years batch ! Great work.:greenthumb:

Hope the same trend continues and these seedlings turn into big sized palms in the years to come.:winkie:

Wishing you all the best,

Lots of love,

kris :)

No sign of green here in Hawaii. I notice that Peter's seed is at ground level while I thought they were to be burried deep?

Hi Steve, actually I planted all of my Borassus seeds fairly shallow (I didn't want the first leaf to rot before it reached the surface). I also noticed how Kris had his planted and he's an expert! This one that has the first leaf showing gets more water than the rest and this is the first one to show a leaf. goood luck, Peter

Tks Peter,

I have two in pots I should get brave and dump one out to see whats going on underground.

3 in the ground planted at 3" 6" 9". Hope they didn't rot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Peter Pacific

Dear Peter :)

Finally i see life,many B.F seeds were sent to our forum friends...but i think you were the first to reach this stage in this years batch ! Great work.:greenthumb:

Hope the same trend continues and these seedlings turn into big sized palms in the years to come.:winkie:

Wishing you all the best,

Lots of love,

kris :)

No sign of green here in Hawaii. I notice that Peter's seed is at ground level while I thought they were to be burried deep?

Hi Steve, actually I planted all of my Borassus seeds fairly shallow (I didn't want the first leaf to rot before it reached the surface). I also noticed how Kris had his planted and he's an expert! This one that has the first leaf showing gets more water than the rest and this is the first one to show a leaf. goood luck, Peter

Tks Peter,

I have two in pots I should get brave and dump one out to see whats going on underground.

3 in the ground planted at 3" 6" 9". Hope they didn't rot.

Well, Steve, I have good and bad news. I have four Borassus seedlings that have sent up its first leaf! I also have three that have rotted and I'm crushed. It may be because they were shallow but were watered often so I thought they'd be fine. The four that have leaves are doing great. Good Luck to you, Peter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmatierMeg

I'm afraid to check mine in the ground. I'm afraid the cold, wet winter may have done it in. My husband is getting impatient for that first leaf so I may have to look and make other plans if the news is grim.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Zeeth

I'm afraid to check mine in the ground. I'm afraid the cold, wet winter may have done it in. My husband is getting impatient for that first leaf so I may have to look and make other plans if the news is grim.

Don't do it. The roots are very easy to break, and you may kill it in the process!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Peter Pacific

Hi Keith, Meg, Kris...

Actually it was fascinating. One of the roots on a seed that was planted had already 12 or 15 inches growth but went soft where it was attached to the seed itself. So yesterday we dug it up to see what was happening. Well, this root must be 4 1/2 feet long! It was soft where it meets the seed but the root was pretty firm under the ground and had tiny secondary roots coming off the main radicle. Do you think the root is long enough to survive without the nutrients of the mother seed? Kris? Since we thought the seed had perished (and noticed it was planted almost on top of a sprinkler pipe) we moved it but we didn't pull it out we dug a five foot deep hole and moved all the dirt before it was released.

The others in the garden are doing well but this will be interesting to see if the seed can survive.

Peter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kris

Dear Peter :)

What you have experienced is normal.When they develop a stable & sound root system they disconnect themselves from the seed.

See my post No.108,it has visuals..seeing it you will understand that its quite normal !

And try to avoide transplanting these seedlings,since they could die very easily.

Love,

kris :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Peter Pacific

Dear Peter :)

What you have experienced is normal.When they develop a stable & sound root system they disconnect themselves from the seed.

See my post No.108,it has visuals..seeing it you will understand that its quite normal !

And try to avoide transplanting these seedlings,since they could die very easily.

Love,

kris :)

Dear Kris, Meg, Steve, Keith and all others who are following this thread;

Kris, I saw your post No. 108 but read that the seeds stayed connected up to two years so I thought there was no hope (my seeds have separated after only a couple of months). Well, I just got in from the garden with Willie and was lamenting over my recent losses. I showed him where the perished seeds were and he wanted to see more so we began to dig. WELL, two of the seeds that I thought I lost have leaves!!! The seeds did disconnect and the root is stringy and soft but down below is another story! There are two small leaves stretching for the surface and I have regained two Borassus that I thought had rotted. The new leaves on both of the seeds are about 12 or 15 inches below the surface of the ground so we left a "hole" in the dirt so they won't suffocate. But covered them enough so they won't burn. Not only am I thrilled to have these palms back but what an education in the germination of Borassus flabellifer. I would tell all Palmtalk devotees to be patient with these palms and check below the surface even if the seeds are no longer part of the root system. They may be alive. I was very careful not to disturb the remaining roots and will post photos as soon as the leaves emerge. Peter

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kris

Dear peter :)

Great to hear this news,And the reason for my seed disengagement & your seed time frame...?

The reason my Seedling was placed in a plastic barrel hardly 2 feet in depth with pure sandy soil.With no special nutriants to support it.While your soil area is rich valconic and the seedlings are able to establish even faster due to infinate soil depth and high grade nutriation,which are lacking in my method.:blink:

So that's the reason for this phenomemon....:D

My gut feeling is that these borassus that you are growing will reach 4 to 6 feet of soild trunk much faster than what we can achieve here in south india.:lol:

Keep up the good work ! :greenthumb: And by the way iam impressed with your successes rate !

Lots of love,

kris :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Peter Pacific

post-2997-12723013750102_thumb.jpg

This is a picture of where the Borassus seeds was planted. We dug a hole to expose the small emerging leaf.

post-2997-12723015040169_thumb.jpg

The hole I left open so the leaf doesn't rot under the surface of the ground about 12 inches or so, 20-25 centimeters. There is a small weed on the left and the new palm leaf in the center.

Peter

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kris

Dear Peter :)

Thanks for the visuals,But iam surprised to see how deep you have planted that seed ? :D

That is really deep !

Love,

kris :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Peter Pacific

Hi Kris, The seed that detached itself was on the surface of the ground, almost exposed. The hole we left is where the new leaf is emerging from...about 14 inches below the ground level...I remember reading a post that mentioned a leaf that suffocated because it couldn't get to the surface and the palm died. This new leaf is emerging far below the level of the planted seed.

All my best to you, Peter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kris

Dear Peter :)

In tropical climate,the underground leaf never rots,that phenonmena is for only clod countries.

Here i see many of the borassus growing at the foot of the mother palm,all automatically with no human assist to help them out of its sprouting journey..

Love,

kris :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kris

An update...

IMG_0045.jpg

A close-up still

IMG_0046.jpg

Love,

kris :)

.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kumar

Kris, what do you eventually plan to do with that - since it seems to me that the plastic drum will not be able to contain the juvenile for too long?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kris

Dear Kumar :)

I think this palm will have to be in that barrel for a couple of years more,then i will plant it in our garden where all other non native palms have perished ! :winkie: And by the way i not only grow palm at my residence i even do research on them...So i would say iam learning how they respond to a given climatic condition.

Love,

kris :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Kris

Video Update !

Love,

kris.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MAUSER

Hi Kris. This year I have not put heat to the Borassus. One day the temperature fell to -1.5 º C and another to 0.5 ° C, no damage is observed, only a few small round spots. All good.

Thanks a lot

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MKIVRYAN

Any updates on these palms? Would love to hear about progress.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
smile
My palm is gone.
I hope ever to try it again.
I know I put him straight into a higher-pot.
That was my fault

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MKIVRYAN

Anybody else?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Peter Pacific

Here's an updated picture of mine, that same one in a post from a few years ago when it was just a germinated seed. I have seven on the property, three that are really thriving and this one is the largest. It has never been moved and the seed, germinated in this spot, looks like some day will be a real monster! The very green trunk is stout and healthy and has black marks at the leaf bases. A gorgeous palm that is just over five years old.

Thank you again Kris...my friend from Chennai!

Peter

post-2997-0-04487700-1424927798_thumb.jp

post-2997-0-10540800-1424927634_thumb.jp

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmatierMeg

I have two planted in my garden lot. Will take photos.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmatierMeg

This is my largest/oldest Borassus flabellifer. I planted it as a strap-leafer from a treepot into my garden lot in late 2011. Petioles have turned yellow with black teeth.

post-1349-0-09607700-1424994488_thumb.jp

post-1349-0-47035500-1424994533_thumb.jp

post-1349-0-34865600-1424994602_thumb.jp

post-1349-0-18945700-1424994669_thumb.jp

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmatierMeg

And this is my smaller Borassus. It came from the same seeds Kris sent but germinated nearly a year later than its sibling.

post-1349-0-96459400-1424994831_thumb.jp

post-1349-0-00885600-1424994888_thumb.jp

post-1349-0-25940600-1424994937_thumb.jp

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alicehunter2000

I'm hoping Eric at Leu Gardens sees this thread and has good news on Kris' s seedling that I gave to him. Kris was kind enough to send me two different batches and I had great successes germinating and getting to the seedling stage. But my winters are just too harsh and decided to donate the last seedling to Leu Gardens.....I really hope it is alive and doing well. Glad to hear others have had successes with Kris' seeds.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sabal Steve

I have a few B. aethiopum that have germinated and are sending down their root (not sure if this is technically a root. Does anyone have any recommendations on a minimum pot depth? For the soil I was planning on using cactus soil mixed with Vermiculite - any thoughts on that?

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alicehunter2000

At least 2ft. Would be my guess...deeper even better

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Zeeth

Steve, germinating this genus is really tricky. Check out this article on PASCOA.

http://www.pacsoa.org.au/wiki/Borassus_flabellifer_germination

There are some threads on PT from a few years ago of a few people who had success. I hear that this genus is tricky in California though, so good luck.

Here's a pic of the B. flabellifer at Fairchild. It's much larger than the last time I saw it 4 years ago. It's doing very nicely!

IMG_4091.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MKIVRYAN

Truly a beautiful palm. Surprising there are not more offered for sale in the US. There is a large one here in Phx AZ that a Palm talker planted from seed a long time ago. I will try And get a picture next time I'm invited to stop by.

Edited by MKIVRYAN

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sabal Steve

Steve, germinating this genus is really tricky. Check out this article on PASCOA.

http://www.pacsoa.org.au/wiki/Borassus_flabellifer_germination

There are some threads on PT from a few years ago of a few people who had success. I hear that this genus is tricky in California though, so good luck.

Here's a pic of the B. flabellifer at Fairchild. It's much larger than the last time I saw it 4 years ago. It's doing very nicely!

IMG_4091.jpg

At least 2ft. Would be my guess...deeper even better

Thanks guys. I've heard so much variation on how to do this... I've been told at least 4 different methods (and thank you to everyone who took their time to explain the process to me).

I read the Pacsoa article, and understand that it's best to start the suspension technique once the radicle is about 10 inches long - the goal is to prevent the emerging leaves from rotting.

But I've also spoken with people who said no such care is needed, and if you just plant them in a deep pot, with excellent drainage, and they will push through fine.

I've spoken with people who germinate them in a 3 gallon pot, and then take the seed/radicle and place it on top of that same 3 gal filled with dirt, and a flipped over one gallon pot as a spacer that radicle passes through.

Some of the methods I'm a little unclear on still, and basically would like to germinate in one well drained pot start to finish; With cactus soil and vermiculite - like to the right in the diagram?

How long does the radicle need to be before it would send it's first emergent leaf? What factors would influence this?

post-7959-0-95646400-1436739482_thumb.jp

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
PalmatierMeg

If I remember right, when my seeds showed the first "white button" of germination, we took two 14" treepots, cut the bottom out of one, then duct taped them together to form one 24" tall tree pot. Then I filled it with palm/cactus mix and plenty of perlite for extra drainage. I buried the seed halfway, then let it do its thing in a shady spot. It took many months for the first leaf to show. I left the seedling in its pot until it had several strap leaves and roots started to grow out of pot. Then I planted it the following spring on my garden lot. It gets no irrigation, only summer rain. It doesn't mind dry season at all.

I don't think this palm is very cold hardy. If my temps were to fall to freezing I would cover mine with flannel sheets to protect it, esp. from frost. The growing point is still below ground so the palm would probably survive but I don't want it to defoliate. Not fast growing by any means.

How would this species do in Cali's winter rains?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sabal Steve

If I remember right, when my seeds showed the first "white button" of germination, we took two 14" treepots, cut the bottom out of one, then duct taped them together to form one 24" tall tree pot. Then I filled it with palm/cactus mix and plenty of perlite for extra drainage. I buried the seed halfway, then let it do its thing in a shady spot. It took many months for the first leaf to show. I left the seedling in its pot until it had several strap leaves and roots started to grow out of pot. Then I planted it the following spring on my garden lot. It gets no irrigation, only summer rain. It doesn't mind dry season at all.

I don't think this palm is very cold hardy. If my temps were to fall to freezing I would cover mine with flannel sheets to protect it, esp. from frost. The growing point is still below ground so the palm would probably survive but I don't want it to defoliate. Not fast growing by any means.

How would this species do in Cali's winter rains?

Thanks Meg,

So the seed germinated, and was set 12" down within a 24" pot? Do you have any thoughts what would happen if you just placed it at the top of a 12" pot and let the roots grow? Seems like it wouldn't have to push through that extra 12" of dirt to see the light?

Like this?

post-7959-0-36605200-1436743805_thumb.jp

As for the winters here, I don't get very cold, and I don't think my yard has ever reached freezing temps - 10b. I would plan on growing it to a good size container plant before putting it in the ground if it ever came to that. I think that it may have a chance if it had really free draining soil, or by mound planting it. I'm surprised that none of the growers are experimenting with these with their higher heat, and DG soil... None that I know of.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sabal Steve

Here's a picture of a B. flabellifer growing in California. Not exactly pretty but it looks like it's hanging in there.

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/showimage/303680/

Looks like it's in a lot of shade. I have to think it would fare much better in sun. An experiment of mine.

My seeds are from B. aethopium, but I believe that there are a lot of shared characteristics between the two.

Here's the picture from the link above.

post-7959-0-83073000-1436749037_thumb.pn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...