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osideterry

Pics of Huge Sabals...

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surferjr

Had one thought it was a Washitonia...sprayed it with roundup...O well! :blink:

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ghar41

I took this pic a couple of years ago. This monster sits at Foster Botanical Garden on Oahu. For scale, there is a big guy in the picture. Wish I could remember the species.....maybe someone can help?

post-376-1234741177_thumb.jpg

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PalmatierMeg
trunk.

Bismarkia (left) and Sabal causiarum (right)

Luke, I was able to scrounge about 15 seeds from the ground beneath this Sabal causiarum on Thanksgiving weekend. They started germinating about a week ago.

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surferjr
Here are a couple pictures of big Sabals. This one was near the coast south of Cancun, just growing there wild I assume. It looks like an S. yapa, but who knows. The bottom one is the huge Sabal that is supposedly the big S. yapa. This plant was purchased from DeArmand Hull 15 years ago.

IMG_1433-1.jpg

DSCF0617.jpg

Christian howsit?

Pogobob and I have used these palms for shooting practice with out M1....you want to join in?

All the best,

clark

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buffy
I took this pic a couple of years ago. This monster sits at Foster Botanical Garden on Oahu. For scale, there is a big guy in the picture. Wish I could remember the species.....maybe someone can help?

I want that! Please tell me where to find it!!

Edited by buffy

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Perito

post-1839-1234762074_thumb.jpg I saw this Palm at Gary Woods Nursery (South Coast Palms). After they splashed water on me, when I regained consciousness and eventually speech, I asked Gary what it was and he said it is Sabal dominguensis.

This other one is labeled Sabal causiarum in Santa Barbara.post-1839-1234762116_thumb.jpg

Here's a close up of the leaf-post-1839-1234762150_thumb.jpg

Jv- It's got seeds. I'll get you some if I can reach them next time I'm there. ---Perito

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freakypalmguy
I took this pic a couple of years ago. This monster sits at Foster Botanical Garden on Oahu. For scale, there is a big guy in the picture. Wish I could remember the species.....maybe someone can help?

That is magnificent Glenn. I imaging it's stretched a bit as it looks like it is under canopy. Hopefully someone will get an ID on this one.

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gsn
I took this pic a couple of years ago. This monster sits at Foster Botanical Garden on Oahu. For scale, there is a big guy in the picture. Wish I could remember the species.....maybe someone can help?

Glenn,

Are you sure that is a sabal ,and not a Corypha?

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pogobob
post-1839-1234762074_thumb.jpg I saw this Palm at Gary Woods Nursery (South Coast Palms). After they splashed water on me, when I regained consciousness and eventually speech, I asked Gary what it was and he said it is Sabal dominguensis.

This other one is labeled Sabal causiarum in Santa Barbara.post-1839-1234762116_thumb.jpg

Here's a close up of the leaf-post-1839-1234762150_thumb.jpg

Jv- It's got seeds. I'll get you some if I can reach them next time I'm there. ---Perito

How dare you call the Bismarkia in the top pic a Sabloh! :lol:

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Perito
post-1839-1234762074_thumb.jpg I saw this Palm at Gary Woods Nursery (South Coast Palms). After they splashed water on me, when I regained consciousness and eventually speech, I asked Gary what it was and he said it is Sabal dominguensis.

This other one is labeled Sabal causiarum in Santa Barbara.post-1839-1234762116_thumb.jpg

Here's a close up of the leaf-post-1839-1234762150_thumb.jpg

Jv- It's got seeds. I'll get you some if I can reach them next time I'm there. ---Perito

How dare you call the Bismarkia in the top pic a Sabloh! :lol:

My apologies, you're right! And I looked through my photos and I didn't get a good shot of that Sabal dominguensis that I thought was so awesome. Here's a real Sabal I saw in Costa Rica- not sure what species.

post-1839-1234801704_thumb.jpg

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swamptreenelly

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FRITO

Glenn, thats an awesome palm, But I too feel its a corphya!

Perry, great photos, however I think your latest post shows a blue latan palm:Latania loddigesii

(look close at the base how it flares.)

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Perito
Glenn, thats an awesome palm, But I too feel its a corphya!

Perry, great photos, however I think your latest post shows a blue latan palm:Latania loddigesii

(look close at the base how it flares.)

:) Thanks Frito. Looks like I need to go back to I.D. School! Perry

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Peter

Here are some Sabals growing at Pierce College in the San Fernando Valley, California. I'm afraid I don't know my Sabals, so someone else will have to id them:

IMG_2690.jpg

IMG_2691.jpg

IMG_2695.jpg

IMG_2696.jpg

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ghar41
Glenn, thats an awesome palm, But I too feel its a corphya!

Thanks FRITO and others, I'm sure you are correct. I always thought it was a giant Sabal. Thanks for the help :)

There was another Corphya that was in bloom during my visit at FBG. It must be a different species as the leaves were quite different.

Sorry for getting off topic!

post-376-1234833712_thumb.jpg

post-376-1234833732_thumb.jpg

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Perito

:mrlooney: O.K, here's some Sabals located at Huntington Gardens (Please God, let them be Sabals!). :winkie:

post-1839-1235016727_thumb.jpg post-1839-1235016760_thumb.jpg post-1839-1235016788_thumb.jpg

They were labeled as: Sabal mexicana, Sabal palmetto (as I recall), and Sabal uresana (although I heard it might be a hybrid). - Perito

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Perito

Maybe I missed it, but I didn't see anything mentioned in this thread. The last 2 issues of 'The Palm Journal' (put out by the Palm Society of Southern California) are almost entirely devoted to the genus Sabal. Nice articles and photos and a great article by Don Hodel including a key to identify species. www.palmssc.org for information on obtaining copies Issues 189 & 190. Perito

P.S. New person handling back issues is- Jeff Rood 10 Sugarpine Drive Trabuco Canyon, CA. 92679-1409

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osideterry

Perry - You were 2 out of 3 in the last post. The 3rd photo is a nice Livistona, probably australis, but maybe decora. All great palm photos, and I'm not about to try ID'ing the 2 Sabals. (Causarium and Riverside?)

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freakypalmguy

I found this picture in an old thread of one of Merrills huge Sabals. It is a beauty.

uresana1.jpg

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FRITO

adding some more pics from various other threads

AL in Kona's

Sabal sp. 'huge leaf'

link here

I have a Sabal sp. 'huge leaf' (Ferguson garden) growing in our garden. It pretty much fends for itself in that it rarely gets supplemental watering or fertilizing either. About all I've done is throw some mulch around it to help control weed growth. The width of each leaf is at least 1.5m (5ft.) and you can see the petiole size by the pic below. Here it is:

http://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?ac...st&id=42284

http://www.palmtalk.org/forum/index.php?ac...st&id=42285

post-90-1225757884_thumb.jpg

post-90-1225757903_thumb.jpg

Edited by FRITO

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sonoranfans
I found this picture in an old thread of one of Merrills huge Sabals. It is a beauty.

uresana1.jpg

The fronds on this one look just like my sabal bermudana. Mine is not this massive though. I wonder what merill did to grow such a beast, its truly a magnificent specimen :drool: .

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freakypalmguy
I found this picture in an old thread of one of Merrills huge Sabals. It is a beauty.

The fronds on this one look just like my sabal bermudana. Mine is not this massive though. I wonder what merill did to grow such a beast, its truly a magnificent specimen :drool: .

That's interesting you say that, It is thought to be S. uresana, but in the other thread some thought S. bermudana like you. Whatever it is, I want one (or ten) just like it :)

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FRITO

Sabal bermudana habitat - photos courtesy of Mike in Bermuda.

note- there is variations in the populations, some show green while other have bluish /silverish tones.

Sabalbermudahabitat2.jpg

Sabalbermudahabitat3.jpg

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freakypalmguy

That last pic looks an awfull lot like the one I posted above. Nice ones Luke.

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Tomas

This should be Sabal bermudana, with a "person" for comparison

Tomas

post-738-1235162496_thumb.jpg

Edited by Tomas

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sonoranfans
I found this picture in an old thread of one of Merrills huge Sabals. It is a beauty.

The fronds on this one look just like my sabal bermudana. Mine is not this massive though. I wonder what merill did to grow such a beast, its truly a magnificent specimen :drool: .

That's interesting you say that, It is thought to be S. uresana, but in the other thread some thought S. bermudana like you. Whatever it is, I want one (or ten) just like it :)

From what I've seen the uresana leaflets are more deeply divided, but I could be wrong as sabals can be variable. The uresanas I've seen are also more blue than a bermudana. The yellowing around the hastula and the intermediate degree of leaflet division says bermudana to me. Thanks for the great pics guys, just a beuatiful palm in habitat, and in yards.

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merrill

Hi, Tom, Gilbert, Matt, & Luke:

My Sabal uresana in post #101 was abandoned for years. Poor light in the corner where it is growing makes it look less blue than it is. It is much bluer than any S. bermudana I've seen, altho OTOH, there are perfectly green S. uresana; I have a pair.

I've never seen a S. bermudana as blue as Luke's second photo in post #104; it seems unique amongst those posted..

Best Wishes,

merrill

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freakypalmguy

Funny thing happened yesterday, I was showing my wife some of the pictures on Palm Talk. While I was showing her pictures of a few different types of Dypsis, she remarked, "I like the look of those monster Sabals better than those scrawny Dypsis". I laughed my tail off.

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Phil

Matt,

That is funny. But, there's a truth in it. If everything in the garden looks like a King Palm, what a boring garden it would be. The fan palms add a different look, dimension and texture to the garden. As I've said before, newbies to palms always are looking for a skinny, crownshafted palm. It does take a bit of time to develope an appreciation for fan palms.

I've always had a particular fascination with Sabal Causiarum. It has those huge, light colored trunks that look like freeway pillars. And, the crowns are almost too small for the massive trunks:

sabal_causarium_001.gif

If you have a huge yard, how would you like this look (Sabal dominguensis)?

00sabal_domingensis_001.gif

Impressive, isn't it? Terry, thanks for starting this thread. Perhaps more people will come to understand Matt's wife's comment.

Phil

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PalmGuyWC

Something for the nubies that should be pointed out: When Sabals are young and just forming a trunk, or maybe a foot or two of trunk, the crowns are huge and so are the fronds. As the trunk grows (say 30 or 40 years) the fronds are smaller and so is the crown. I think they are more impressive when they are younger with larger crowns but they take up a lot of room.

Dick

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FRITO

heres what was labeled Sabal 'umbraculifera' in Ft Myers

easily as big as the S. causiarum

massive sabal dwarfing the nearby palmettos. I didnt get a shot of the entire palm before my battery died :(

but my size 12 shoe for scale(sorry no red converse)

post-741-1235283333_thumb.jpg

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FRITO

I found just a portion of the trunk of the S. 'umbraculifera' and other palms to give you some idea of its size.

it the UPPER FAR RIGHT fraction of a trunk in the photo. compare to Canary, foxtail (far left), and the big Attalea

post-741-1235283545_thumb.jpg

Edited by FRITO

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Jon T

Terry, look again at Perito's third palm in post 96: It IS a sabal, not a livistona, and probably a uresana. Click on it twice, and observe: the big loose sabal boots on a broad trunk, the bigger, stiffer (than decora), visibly costapalmate bluish leaves, and the size! It dwarfs the other palms in the picture -- a decipiens is a pretty "medium" palm and this palm is huge.

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FRITO
Terry, look again at Perito's third palm in post 96: It IS a sabal, not a livistona, and probably a uresana. Click on it twice, and observe: the big loose sabal boots on a broad trunk, the bigger, stiffer (than decora), visibly costapalmate bluish leaves, and the size! It dwarfs the other palms in the picture -- a decipiens is a pretty "medium" palm and this palm is huge.

I agree Jon. definently a Sabal. and if I had to guess Id say uresana as well.

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iamjv

Great additions to this fantastic thread...

Luke, have you collected seed from that second sabal pictured in post #104??? Nice blue hue to it!

Jv

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FRITO

Jv

that blue S. bermuda in post 104 came from Mike in Bermuda, he sent the photos to me along with seeds he collected that day, I am not sure if my seedlings are from that tree, the strap leaves are green and dont show any blue characteristics. The seed was large(large as Sabal tamaulipas and Sabal Blackburiana) and the strap leaves are wide as well.

It is reminiscent of a Bismarckia!

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FRITO

Here is Sabal 'umbraculifera' - West Indies Sabal in Ft Myers.

Notice the Brown trunk, run-of-the-mil Sabal palmetto next to it.

Size 12 shoe for scale!

post-741-12666376771575_thumb.jpg

post-741-12666377736735_thumb.jpg

post-741-12666378867179_thumb.jpg

post-741-12666379121334_thumb.jpg

post-741-12666379750285_thumb.jpg

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FRITO

Here is Sabal Causiarum in Ft. Myers, FL

post-741-12666384567328_thumb.jpg

post-741-12666385027702_thumb.jpg

post-741-12666385375002_thumb.jpg

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