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Jim in Los Altos

Pinanga javana

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Jim in Los Altos

I've got an order coming Friday from Floribunda and in it are five one gallon Pinanga javana. Are these difficult palms or are they a breeze to grow? Any advice would be greatly appreciated. :)

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palmtreesforpleasure

Hi Jim

Needs a warm spot, does not appear to like the cold

regards

colin

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Daryl

Although they are hardier than a lot of Pinangas, they are still pretty tender!

They like heat, but will also tolerate more dry than most Pinangas I've tried.

Daryl

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SubTropicRay

If well fed and watered in dry periods, it is one of the faster growing Pinanga.

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quaman58

Jim,

They do grow well, but really can't take freezes or even prolonged or continuous sub- 35f weather. It doesn't mean they're impossible though. My experience is with young ones (seedlings). I would keep them in pots for a couple years anyway, and in filtered light. I've heard they take sun eventually, but I haven't got mine to that point apparently; they hate any direct sun at a young age. After seeing your Licualas, I think you could grow these...

Bret

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Tyrone

This is a species I've been after for ages now. I wish I could find one.

Best regards

Tyrone

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TikiRick

Killed more than I care to admit.

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cobra2326

For me, this has been the easiest Pinanga to grow. That said, Pinanga is also the genus I've had the most trouble with. In my experience, they all need a fast draining soil and good amounts of water. Pinangas are very susceptible to damping off, especially in cold periods when growth slows down. If the new leaves start getting yellow or chloric, it's either lacking nutrients, too much salt built up, or poor soil aeration.

I think it's a very beautiful palm and worth the protection and effort. Definitely also one of the more available and fast growing species.

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Walter John

I've only killed this once, mm, time to try another one next growing season.

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paulgila

one of mine recently died.it was doing well then suddenly dried up.

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Jim in Los Altos

Hmmm, lots of differing opinions but I see one thing in common seems to be that they're not necessarily an easy palm to grow. That's one of the reasons I purchased five. I'm hoping to get a couple of stronger ones in the mix.

I'll do everything you've all recommended including a fast draining soil watered often and fed during the warmer months and I will plant them in two gallon containers and protect them in the winter months whenever it's particularly cold.

Thanks for all the advice!

By the way, the other palms I ordered from Floribunda are Dypsis saintlucei, Trachycarpus martianus, and Beccariophoenix 'alfredii'

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mppalms

Jim,

Being not too many miles from you, I can give you some advice: take good care of them while they are young. I lost ALL (I mean ALL) of the Pinanga javana I got from Floribunda last year. They just didn't like our cold (but never under 35 F where I am) January this year. I protected them but didn't keep them in a greenhouse. Big mistake. They croaked. I think I received them too late in the summer, and they didn't have time to get established in their pots before the weather turned cool. This year, I started in the spring, and I think I have a shot. (I have two more from Floribunda.)

I suspect this is one palm that will be hard to keep alive on the peninsula. I haven't had much luck with any of the "hardier" Pinangas.

Jason

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Jim in Los Altos

Jason,

Sound advice, thanks. I've read their hardiness to cold to be about 26F and also that there are some nice ones growing in parts of So. Cal. and assumed that it P. javana would be the only Pinanga to try here in the south Bay Area. I had a Pinanga 'coronata' in the ground two winters before it suddenly bit the dust. I guess a young P. javana isn't going to appreciate a long chilly spell so I'll bring them inside in those conditions.

Are they much hardier as bigger specimens I wonder?

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mppalms
Jason,

Sound advice, thanks. I've read their hardiness to cold to be about 26F and also that there are some nice ones growing in parts of So. Cal. and assumed that it P. javana would be the only Pinanga to try here in the south Bay Area. I had a Pinanga 'coronata' in the ground two winters before it suddenly bit the dust. I guess a young P. javana isn't going to appreciate a long chilly spell so I'll bring them inside in those conditions.

Are they much hardier as bigger specimens I wonder?

I suspect they get tougher with age and need a strong root system to survive our winters. I'll give them a couple of years and then see. I plan to give "experimental" palms a couple of chances before giving up. Good luck! We can compare notes after this winter.

Jason

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Don Little

Jim,

I got a two gallon from phil back in fall of 2006 from Phil at JM. It made it thru the freeze 0f Jan 07 with no problems although it was in a protected area. I planted it in the ground in the spring of 07 and has done good so far. It is working on it's 3rd leaf this year. For some reason the last leaf was a little smaller than the others but other than that appears healthy and the new spear looks to be normal size. mine is planted in shady area where the soil stays moist but has good drainage being decomposed granite. You also might want to try a P philippinensis as they seem to have some cold hardiness and is doing good in my location.

Here is pic of mine back in May of this year. The spear you see growing is the one that opened smaller than the others but already has another spear that size sand seems to be doing well.

IMG_1597.jpg

Don

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mppalms

Don,

I wish mine looked like that! I think your location must get higher temps, which undoubtedly help. All of the Pinanga I'm trying this year (including philippinensis) are doing well thus far, but they haven't seen real cold yet. Fingers crossed.

Jason

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Matt in OC

Bump. Anyone growing this currently in SoCal? Any advice or comments?

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Cindy Adair

No advice on California growing, sorry. Easy for me in Puerto Rico-plant tiny and do nothing here works fine.

However I must live in a Pinanga sweet spot except for Pinanga maculata which repeatedly succumbs. I'll try for a photo soon if a break in the rain, but not nearly as distinctive so far as some of my others. I would enjoy some pictures of trunking ones from anywhere, thanks!

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Cocoa Beach Jason
On August 13, 2008 at 7:47:08 AM, SubTropicRay said:

If well fed and watered in dry periods, it is one of the faster growing Pinanga.

Ray, do you have this plant growing well in the Tampa area? 

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DoomsDave

I've got two, haven't killed either.

They've done very well, all things considered.

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sashaeffer

Well hopefully yours will come in their grow pots like a lot of my two orders did and you can keep them in that amazing "soil" for the fast drainage they need. Even the few that I've received that didn't come in their pots most of the soil/cinder was wrapped tight with the palms.

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Matt in OC
24 minutes ago, DoomsDave said:

I've got two, haven't killed either.

They've done very well, all things considered.

How much sun/water, Dave?

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palmsOrl

I have one in the ground here, planted it in fall 2014.  The palm grew fast, so I potted it up several times before finally planting it.  It was large enough, and beginning to trunk by the end of 2013, so I left it outside all winter.  It experienced quite a bit of chill, especially for being in a pot (many hours between 35-45F) and this clearly stunted the palm.  To this day, it seems to be affected by this stunting, though it has at least a foot of clear trunk and is marginally healthy.  It's health does seem to be improving very gradually, despite being outdoors in the ground for the past two winters.  I think it will look healthy and normal by this coming fall.  Really need to get a photo of this one posted.

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quaman58

Matt, 

I have one that is planted under the eaves of my roof. I first planted one in 2006 in an exposed area of the yard; the January 2007 freeze killed it outright. So I purchased a couple others later that year, kept them in a pot for a couple years, & then plugged one in the aforementioned area. It's about 8' overall, with about a foot or so of ringed trunk. It receives direct sun most of the year until 1:00 or so & then it's in the shadow of the house. A very rugged plant, (as in hardy to cool conditions); which is remarkable considering it's origins. Hasn't flowered yet, but I suspect that's not too far off. Just a beautiful, tropical looking palm. I'll grab a picture tomorrow when it's light.

Bret

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Matt in OC
1 hour ago, quaman58 said:

Matt, 

I have one that is planted under the eaves of my roof. I first planted one in 2006 in an exposed area of the yard; the January 2007 freeze killed it outright. So I purchased a couple others later that year, kept them in a pot for a couple years, & then plugged one in the aforementioned area. It's about 8' overall, with about a foot or so of ringed trunk. It receives direct sun most of the year until 1:00 or so & then it's in the shadow of the house. A very rugged plant, (as in hardy to cool conditions); which is remarkable considering it's origins. Hasn't flowered yet, but I suspect that's not too far off. Just a beautiful, tropical looking palm. I'll grab a picture tomorrow when it's light.

Bret

Fantastic. Thanks, Bret!

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DoomsDave
15 hours ago, Matt in OC said:

How much sun/water, Dave?

HIgh canopy, plenty of water.

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SubTropicRay

Jason, southern exposure of a house with an overhead live oak helps.  It appears to have enough cold tolerance to succeed in the average central Florida freeze.  I know the return of the next great freeze will likely wipe it out.

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OB Burt

I had a sickly one (spider mite) in my shade house which I gave to a friend. After 

it flourished under his care I decided to give it another shot. Mine  is doing well in a shady somewhat protected spot.It definitely has a chance in So Cal

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quaman58

Opening the first leaf of spring..

image.jpg

image.jpg

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Stevetoad
6 minutes ago, quaman58 said:

Opening the first leaf of spring..

image.jpg

image.jpg

Great palm Bret!

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Matt in OC
13 hours ago, quaman58 said:

Opening the first leaf of spring..

image.jpg

image.jpg

Spectacular, Bret. Thanks for sharing!

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quaman58

Thanks Matt & Steve,

 

As you can see, there's a bit of yellowish color coming out of winter, but it grows so quickly once things warm up it looks even nicer by mid summer. It throws about 3-4 fronds a year around here, so the vertical growth is pretty good.

Bret 

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User00

Thanks for sharing

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NApalm

Nice Brett

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Tyrone

I managed to find one in a nursery in Carnarvon about 3 years ago. I was wondering whether it would survive in my Perth garden. Later that year we moved to Albany and I saw that there are fruiting ones in the north island NZ, so I brought it down here and it would have to be the toughest Pinanga I've ever had. It's growing fine in a pot, while my coronatas are surviving with a bit of little leaf and I even have dicksonii growing just. P javana for me grows like a Bangalow and this year I'm putting it into the ground.

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Cindy Adair
On May 3, 2016 at 6:06:38 PM, Cindy Adair said:

No advice on California growing, sorry. Easy for me in Puerto Rico-plant tiny and do nothing here works fine.

However I must live in a Pinanga sweet spot except for Pinanga maculata which repeatedly succumbs. I'll try for a photo soon if a break in the rain, but not nearly as distinctive so far as some of my others. I would enjoy some pictures of trunking ones from anywhere, thanks!

I remember now why I don't photograph this poor palm much! The cattle find it a nice side dish to sample near their main course of Areca vestiarias. It also housed a wasp's nest earlier this year. I am pretty savvy these days but not that day when I tapped the leaves with my walking stick while I was touching the palm! Negative reinforcement of luckily only one sting helps to make me remember. Of course the nest is long gone as I dispatched it the next morning.

Anyway, this one was unceremoniously stuck in the ground tiny as usual in June 2012. Hope one day it will look like the beauties you all were kind enough to post here! Thanks!

DSCN0307.thumb.JPG.b5bba58eede2208d6b885

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akamu

Bret any updates on your javana would be appreciated  . Ilost mine 2ft of trunk after losing its canopy it burnt to a crisp and it was toast .anyway iam getting ready to start over again thanks

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DoomsDave

Javanas are so worth the trouble to keep happy 

6E877D8A-4F91-4C49-B52A-D785635B1ABF.thumb.jpeg.2e0f0cd650cf3e486fb5cc80bb62eb36.jpeg

97E39B13-44D8-4ECF-9263-685478E47565.jpeg

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DoomsDave

The shoe is 12.5” 32 cm long

7FBCB4C3-D72F-47CE-BC6E-D6DBE677CBD6.thumb.jpeg.ce8be975e5ae7a51b875ca5dfe22c043.jpegA6CB0AFF-AA88-4013-BDE7-109CA78B1457.thumb.jpeg.291c50afbfcd90e88bc33c4d974bd88f.jpeg

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DoomsDave
On 5/5/2016 at 4:28 PM, Cindy Adair said:

I remember now why I don't photograph this poor palm much! The cattle find it a nice side dish to sample near their main course of Areca vestiarias. It also housed a wasp's nest earlier this year. I am pretty savvy these days but not that day when I tapped the leaves with my walking stick while I was touching the palm! Negative reinforcement of luckily only one sting helps to make me remember. Of course the nest is long gone as I dispatched it the next morning.

Anyway, this one was unceremoniously stuck in the ground tiny as usual in June 2012. Hope one day it will look like the beauties you all were kind enough to post here! Thanks!

DSCN0307.thumb.JPG.b5bba58eede2208d6b885

Cindy show us!

Waiting, panting in anticipation . . . .

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