Jump to content
bgl

Dr. John Dransfield visits the Big Island

Recommended Posts

bgl

Here's the Dypsis "Jurassic Park" I mentioned above. It belongs to a friend of ours, more or less right around the corner. The palm is not quite completely exposed. There are handful of tall Bentinckia nicobarica in front of it, giving it a little bit of shade. The first photo shows all the palms in this area. The Jurassic Park is dead center, and there are two Orange crush/pilulifera behind it and a Dypsis sp. bejofa to the left.

PS to John - thanks a lot for your additional canaliculata comment. So, presumably (and not surprisingly) another Dypsis mystery...! :)

post-22-1217272245_thumb.jpg

post-22-1217272260_thumb.jpg

post-22-1217272275_thumb.jpg

post-22-1217272293_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gtlevine

Very nice palm Bo, but definately does not look like Tokoravina in POM. I can't wait for Bill to post the updated photo of the large Tokoravina down under.

Gary

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
calyptrocalyx&licuala freck
John, do you have a plan to write a new addition of P.O.M.? I think we are all ready for a new addition.

Gary

Hi Guys,

Gary I'd second that for sure, It would be great to see a new updated version.

John thanks for checking this thread and for the infomation you have given us

it has turned into a very interesting thread great to see your thoughts.

Bo, nice looking specimen, Cheers for those picture's, be good when Bill gets

up to Jan's to get some updated photo's for us to see.

Regards to all, Mikey :)

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bgl

Back in April 2002 I bought three little palms in 4 inch pots from Floribunda Palms under the name Dypsis canaliculata. One of them dried out and died. I have since potted up the other two to larger containers. One is currently in a 5G pot, and the other has been in a 15G pot for a while. With all this Dypsis talk I decided it was time for action! :) So, I planted the big one and here it is. As stated in a post above, John Dransfield is fairly certain that this is NOT D. canaliculata.

Incidentally, in April 2004 I bought a handful of palms from Floribunda under the Dypsis tokoravina name. They were also in 4 inch pots. I planted them in early 2005. JD took a quick look at them and quickly concluded that they are NOT D. tokoravina. We didn't discuss what they might be, but they're beginning to look suspiciously like Dypsis orange crush/pilulifera. So, I dug up three of them today and put them into 5G (1) and 15G (2) pots. As much as I like this palm, I really don't need any more of them in the ground (we have 53 already!). So, I planted the "canaliculata" in one of the three available spots.

post-22-1217294032_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ellidro

looks great!! Can't wait to see it mature.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gtlevine
Back in April 2002 I bought three little palms in 4 inch pots from Floribunda Palms under the name Dypsis canaliculata. One of them dried out and died. I have since potted up the other two to larger containers. One is currently in a 5G pot, and the other has been in a 15G pot for a while. With all this Dypsis talk I decided it was time for action! :) So, I planted the big one and here it is. As stated in a post above, John Dransfield is fairly certain that this is NOT D. canaliculata.

Incidentally, in April 2004 I bought a handful of palms from Floribunda under the Dypsis tokoravina name. They were also in 4 inch pots. I planted them in early 2005. JD took a quick look at them and quickly concluded that they are NOT D. tokoravina. We didn't discuss what they might be, but they're beginning to look suspiciously like Dypsis orange crush/pilulifera. So, I dug up three of them today and put them into 5G (1) and 15G (2) pots. As much as I like this palm, I really don't need any more of them in the ground (we have 53 already!). So, I planted the "canaliculata" in one of the three available spots.

Wow Bo, you know your a palm snob when you can actually dig up Dypsis Orange Crush.

Gary

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BS Man about Palms

I think I have to agree with Gary on that one!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
neoflora

John Dransfield, Several years ago I spent sometime in St. Luce. The forest there contained a palm that look very similar to Big Curly. The palm that you saw as well at Jeff,s. I was convinced it was D. Tokoravina. Because of the open crownshaft. I no you were there sometime after me. I heard that you said they were D. prestoniana. If I remember well the leaves appeared to be falling off the crown. Looking very much like the pic. in POM of D.tokoravina. Could you please comment? If I remember well this was a massive palm.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Matt in SD

Bo,

I also got some "Dypsis tokoravina" from Floribunda as 1g plants in July 2005, I would assume these are the same batch as yours. Mine look exactly like Dypsis carlsmithii though. And when I asked Jeff, he said that he had decided they were carlsmithii (I believe Christian Faulkner also concluded the same). I would be embarrassed to show you how small mine are (just moved to 5g pots, 18-24" leaves) as I assume yours were probably 5 or 6 feet tall by now. I wouldn't mind seeing a photo just to see if they are the same plant. I'm only about 95% convinced it's carlsmithii, still think it could be something similar but different.

As for tokoravina/'jurassic park', here's a photo from Jeff's from a March 2007. I think this shows the bulging leaf sheaths better than a lot of the other photos. and you can see that the crown is nearly completely open. I haven't seen tokoravina in habitat, but Jurassic Park has more of a bulging crownshaft than any other Dypsis I've seen. So it's at least sort of like tokoravina in that respect.

IMG_2884.jpg

Matt

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bgl

Matt,

Actually, in retrospect, I was probably somewhat premature in referring to the "tokoravinas" I bought in 2004 as Orange crush. Now that you mention carlsmithii as a possibilty, I'm definitely inclined to agree that this is a more likely possibility. They aren't quite as upright as some of my other smaller D. carlsmithii (that I have in pots) but they still display the characteristics of a small carlsmithii, so I'm going to assume that that's what they are. And they are not really that large (probably only marginally larger than yours). The main reason I put two of them in 15G pots was because they had a fairly large root system.

And Gary, is digging up carlsmithiis acceptable or would I still fall in the "palm snob" category? :lol:

Bo-Göran

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
John Dransfield

Neoflora - the big palm at Sainte Luce with open sheaths is Dypsis prestoniana, not tokoravina. This confirmed with herbarium specimens. (also illustrated in the Madagascar Palm Field Guide)

Gary - new edition of POM - yes, well that would be something, wouldn't it. Having just finished Genera Palmarum Ed2 (due out at the end of next week) I am enjoying a breathing space! Joking apart, we do have material of at least 20 palms additional to those in POM. I would like to wait a few more years as we try to resolve further problems so that we have a significant new work. WE might even consider electronic publication.

JOhn

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Urban Rainforest
Back in April 2002 I bought three little palms in 4 inch pots from Floribunda Palms under the name Dypsis canaliculata. One of them dried out and died. I have since potted up the other two to larger containers. One is currently in a 5G pot, and the other has been in a 15G pot for a while. With all this Dypsis talk I decided it was time for action! :) So, I planted the big one and here it is. As stated in a post above, John Dransfield is fairly certain that this is NOT D. canaliculata.

Incidentally, in April 2004 I bought a handful of palms from Floribunda under the Dypsis tokoravina name. They were also in 4 inch pots. I planted them in early 2005. JD took a quick look at them and quickly concluded that they are NOT D. tokoravina. We didn't discuss what they might be, but they're beginning to look suspiciously like Dypsis orange crush/pilulifera. So, I dug up three of them today and put them into 5G (1) and 15G (2) pots. As much as I like this palm, I really don't need any more of them in the ground (we have 53 already!). So, I planted the "canaliculata" in one of the three available spots.

Bo, That Dypsis Caniliculata looks awesome there! I was fortunate to get one of these as well and just potted it up into a citrus tall container from a 1 gal. It responded right away throwing a new leaf but told me if I really wanted to make it happy I would bring it to Hawaii with me :) . Hmmm... maybe I could stash it in my luggage so I could see it trunk someday :hmm: . Interesting thing the palm was not that big but it had such a big underground knee that the one gallon would not set flat on the bench :blink: . Anyhows a big thank you to you and Jon for putting a serious dent in these Dypsis mysteries!

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tyrone
Neoflora - the big palm at Sainte Luce with open sheaths is Dypsis prestoniana, not tokoravina. This confirmed with herbarium specimens. (also illustrated in the Madagascar Palm Field Guide)

Gary - new edition of POM - yes, well that would be something, wouldn't it. Having just finished Genera Palmarum Ed2 (due out at the end of next week) I am enjoying a breathing space! Joking apart, we do have material of at least 20 palms additional to those in POM. I would like to wait a few more years as we try to resolve further problems so that we have a significant new work. WE might even consider electronic publication.

JOhn

John, You sure know how to whip us up into a fit of pure hysteria and excitement. A new POM would be awesome, and an electronic format!!!! WOW. That's excitement overload. :yay::drool:

You know you'll be getting never ending emails asking how it's all coming along until it's published now.

Seriously though, if you did wait it would allow many issues to resolve themselves. I look forward to it. In the meantime I'll continue growing my Madagascan palms. :)

Best regards

Tyrone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tyrone

Bo, That D "canaliculata" you planted looks identical to a Dypsis I bought as D canaliculata a few years back. I never thought it was actually canaliculata, but it sure looks different to any Dypsis I currently own. Those who visit my garden always comment on it, asking what it is. As yours will definitely grow quicker and as you will undoubtedly have John Dransfield back one day trying to ID it, keep us posted with photos of it's progress.

Best regards

Tyrone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bgl

As soon as I have anything that may be of interest, you can be certain that PalmTalk is where it'll be posted! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gtlevine
And Gary, is digging up carlsmithiis acceptable or would I still fall in the "palm snob" category? :lol:

Bo-Göran

Palm snob!

Gary

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rafiki

Matt in SD! Great photo of Jeff and D. sp. 'Jurassic Park'! I am beginning to see swollen leafsheath development. Presumably these will open as the palm reaches maturity. Hope to visit Jan Smith tomorrow and will post results that night.

Bill.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rafiki

I also got seeds from Alfred labelled as D. tokoravina but they turned out to be D. carlsmithii! Last year I asked him to show photos of D. tokoravina and all he produced were ones of D. carlsmithii! An honest mistake ...as he is partially crippled and cannot visit forests anymore. It happens.

Bill.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jeff Searle
Thanks Matt! Saved me a lot of hassle tomorrow! Yes...these are true D. nauseosa!

Thanks Mike....good to read your views! Dypsis bejofo (giant white palm and #1 Dypsis in POM) is ok in habitat so far...I saw them in '93 and Jeff Searle and Peter Balasky in 2006. Jeff Searle ...can you confirm this? On a ridge enroute to the Lemurophoenix and Marojejya darianii locality. Was talking to Mark Daish the other day and he lost his D. bejofo...a maginificent specimen...in the cyclone. Perhaps Arden Dearden has a few.

Mike...Jan Smith has a superb example of D. tokoravina that came in as D. sp. Jurassic Park.

Cheers! Bill.

Bill,

You have the memory of an elephant! :) Well sort of.

Remember, Pete and I took the late afternoon walk with Julian and another guide to go see the couple of lemur's in cultivation on somebody's property. It turned out to be a disaster of a hike. No water, half way up, Pete got sick and weak and had to stop and wait for us to return. A 'one hour hike" turned into something like 3-4 hours. Wow, what memories I have as I type.

So, that day we never went up all the way to see the Lemurs. and Marojejya darianii and D. bejofa (or what ever variety it is). And because my feet were in such bad shape, I was not able to go the following morning. Pete didn't want any part of it either! So we sent Julian,guides and hoped for some seed. Which we did get some of. A great couple of days camping at the old malagasy's house. That's a whole nother(is this a word,nother?) story in it's self!! I hope this helps.

PS....I will be having dinner with Pete tonight. I can maybe shake his memory from a previous hike he made there and report back. I am really enjoying all the info. and Bo's pictures. I often ask myself if the day will come when we all will understand this great group of palms. I sure hope so.

Jeff

Bill,

Talked to Pete the other night about a previous trip when he saw Dypsis bejofo, but he dosen't remember really anything about it's looks that would be helpful.

Jeff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
LJG

Bo, this "canaliculata" Dypsis I might have some info on if you wanted to know more about its origin. Ron Lawyer sold me a plant a few years ago he collected himself in Madagascar. He brought back some seedlings and seed. He sold me a plant he grew from seed. He had no ID on it. Well 1 1/2 years later I bring in a plant from Jeff Searle called Dypsis canaliculata which is like the one you have and that every one else's I have seen called "canaliculata". Looking at the two closely one can see they are the same exact plant. So if one really wanted to know more, they could contact Ron. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bgl

Len,

That's great, but assuming Ron is checking this thread, how about a bit of background right here so everybody can benefit from the information!? :huh:

Bo-Göran

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
LJG

Bo, if I had more info I would share. I forgot most the details. I will ask Ron and see if he would post.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
tim_brissy_13

Great thread, gotta love Dypsis!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
John Dransfield

Another of the palms that we looked at in Jeff Marcus' wonderful garden/nursery was the Madagascar Foxtail. We received material of the very plant in the Marcus nursery collected and sent on to me by Don Hodel. The week before I went to Hawaii, Mijoro and I carried out a careful examination of the specimen and compared it with the type specimen of Dypsis marojejyi. We could see no differences at all and after seeing the Madagascar Foxtail in the flesh in Hawaii, I am certain that we should be calling it Dypsis marojejyi.

I hope this lays to rest another of the mysteries.

John

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jeff Searle
Another of the palms that we looked at in Jeff Marcus' wonderful garden/nursery was the Madagascar Foxtail. We received material of the very plant in the Marcus nursery collected and sent on to me by Don Hodel. The week before I went to Hawaii, Mijoro and I carried out a careful examination of the specimen and compared it with the type specimen of Dypsis marojejyi. We could see no differences at all and after seeing the Madagascar Foxtail in the flesh in Hawaii, I am certain that we should be calling it Dypsis marojejyi.

I hope this lays to rest another of the mysteries.

John

John,

Thanks for this additional "house cleaning" on Dypsis marojejyi. As you know, in 2005 three of us (Pete Balasky,Bill Beattie and myself along with Guy) made our way up tp Camp #3 and saw this exciting palm growing there in this narrow habit range. What a beautiful experience we all had to be able to witness this first hand. And then only to talk to Jeff M. later about his plants and how they had begun to flower at such an early age and size. There was so much confusion on if his was the real D. marojejyi or not. Case closed on this mystery!

Jeff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Urban Rainforest

John, Thank you for clearing up the mystery on this my favorite palm in the world! I have one planted at our garden in Hawaii, one planted in our garden here in San Diego that sailed through last winter without even a spot and another that I just potted up into a tall 1 gal. So far they have been one of the easiest Dypsis I have grown and always look flawless ( even the bugs don't touch em :) ). They also exibit quite a bit of cold hardiness even as small seedlings. Jeff, that must have been awesome to see this palm in habitat! At what elevation did you find it at?

Thanks,

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jeff Searle
John, Thank you for clearing up the mystery on this my favorite palm in the world! I have one planted at our garden in Hawaii, one planted in our garden here in San Diego that sailed through last winter without even a spot and another that I just potted up into a tall 1 gal. So far they have been one of the easiest Dypsis I have grown and always look flawless ( even the bugs don't touch em :) ). They also exibit quite a bit of cold hardiness even as small seedlings. Jeff, that must have been awesome to see this palm in habitat! At what elevation did you find it at?

Thanks,

Steve

Steve,

I want to say that they were somewhere around 3,000-4,000' up. There were very few along the trail near camp #3, actually a couple were growing right behind one of our bungalow's. I think John would agree that this is a pretty rare palm in terms of number of plants seen.

This is an extreamly difficult palm to keep alive here in South Florida due to our sea level elevation. Sea level elevation?? Hmmm.... Anyways, I'm down to my last plant that's in a 3 gallon.

Jeff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Urban Rainforest
John, Thank you for clearing up the mystery on this my favorite palm in the world! I have one planted at our garden in Hawaii, one planted in our garden here in San Diego that sailed through last winter without even a spot and another that I just potted up into a tall 1 gal. So far they have been one of the easiest Dypsis I have grown and always look flawless ( even the bugs don't touch em :) ). They also exibit quite a bit of cold hardiness even as small seedlings. Jeff, that must have been awesome to see this palm in habitat! At what elevation did you find it at?

Thanks,

Steve

Steve,

I want to say that they were somewhere around 3,000-4,000' up. There were very few along the trail near camp #3, actually a couple were growing right behind one of our bungalow's. I think John would agree that this is a pretty rare palm in terms of number of plants seen.

This is an extreamly difficult palm to keep alive here in South Florida due to our sea level elevation. Sea level elevation?? Hmmm.... Anyways, I'm down to my last plant that's in a 3 gallon.

Jeff

Jeff, I figured they must come from some elevation because of their cold hardiness. I would imagine Montane species would not like a south Florida summer. I think the reason they are doing well in Hawaii is because we are at elevation and it is cooler. Bo and I are at about 880 ft. elevation, Jerry is about 100 ft. higher than us, I believe Dean is at about 2000 ft. and I'm not sure of the elevation where Jeff Marcus is at. Also the consistent rainfall over there does'nt hurt either. Good luck with your last plant and I hope it does well for you!

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
MattyB

Jeff, so what's the weather like up where Dypsis marojeyji grows? I like to keep my greenhoues nice and hot in the winter and I've killed Hedescepy due to that. I'm wondering if I should dial down the heat a bit if I wanna keep my madfox in there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tyrone
Jeff, so what's the weather like up where Dypsis marojeyji grows? I like to keep my greenhoues nice and hot in the winter and I've killed Hedescepy due to that. I'm wondering if I should dial down the heat a bit if I wanna keep my madfox in there.

I'd like to know the answer to that one too. I'd imagine at that elevation which is 1000-1300m asl approx, that the winters wouldn't be cold, just cool. So low 20's C max in winter and min's around 10C to single digits in winter. In a rainforest environment I doubt that there'd ever be a thing like frost. That palm would feel right at home in Brisbane and the coastal stretch from the Sunshine coast to the Gold Coast, if I'm right about this climate thing. I'd love to try it myself.

regards

Tyrone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Jeff Searle
Jeff, so what's the weather like up where Dypsis marojeyji grows? I like to keep my greenhoues nice and hot in the winter and I've killed Hedescepy due to that. I'm wondering if I should dial down the heat a bit if I wanna keep my madfox in there.

Matty,

As much as I wish I could answer your question, but I really only spent 2 days up there and then made our way back down. This palm is found in a sub-montane forest. That first afternoon,Pete,Guy and myself wanted to climb further past camp #3 on up to the summit. We walked two hours, which was about half way up, and then decided to go back down.Trees were not very tall at this altitude, we were starting to see lots of lower cloud cover I remember, and everything at eye level and down is covered in tiny orchids, ferns and other unknown native plants. Even one specie of staghorn fern was growing in the trees. Everything looked like it was always constantly wet.

To this day, I sorely regret not continuing up the trail to the end, in hopes of re-discovering Dypsis pumila and maybe Ravenea nana.

Jeff

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Tyrone

Sounds like an awesome place Jeff. You painted a nice picture in words. Are there any plans to go back there?

regards

Tyrone

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
calyptrocalyx&licuala freck
We'll deviate here a bit: this is a true Beccariophoenix madagascariensis. It has no windows. The Beccariophoenix WITH windows is NOT B. madagascariensis, and apparently we don't have a valid name for that one yet. And B. alfredii is a third species.

Hi All,

Here's some more food for thought……………………………….................

Here's another one of those Mysteries, Finally we have confirmation regarding Beccariophoenix madagascariensis which has No windows is the true 'sp' Yet in

POM, it clearly shows the windows as the so called true 'sp' (which has yet to be named).But the description given in POM is clearly for the No windows form..!

1:Why for all of these years has the other 'sp' (window's form) never been named..???

2:Why did the third sp B. alfredii (which has only been around for about 4 to 5 years) get named before the windows form...?

One thing to look at here is that B.alfredii is Very Very similar to the true 'sp' there's only a small difference with it's seed. And the Windows form seems to be the species with the most differences.

In Aussie we have had the window's form of Beccariophoenix mature and setting seed for a number of years now which is also in various locations in Aussie, and now there's seedlings from local palms for sale over here but when will this one be named?

Also there has been a few people trying to correct the confusion about these species knowing that the correct species was in fact the No window form so it's great this information has finally................. been confirmed.

Regards, Mikey................. :hmm::blink:

Edited by calyptrocalyx&licuala freck
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rafiki

Today we drove up to Jan Smith's beautiful nursery...main purpose to photograph what I thought was the real Dypsis tokoravina! Things are not what they used to be! Metamorphosis indeed! Compare the next few photos with those taken by Clayton several years ago (on p3). Same palm...same place! Time for me to wait a few more years ...then look again! OK! Anyone prepared to take a punt?

The leaflets are grouped and fanned 2-6 leaflets per group. Perhaps JD will see this and make a comment!

Cheers! Bill.

post-844-1217497466_thumb.jpg

post-844-1217497529_thumb.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rafiki

post-844-1217497699_thumb.jpgand two more!

Bill.

post-844-1217497747_thumb.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rafiki

double trouble so here is the other!

Bill.

post-844-1217497954_thumb.jpg

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
madagascarbob

As a certified Dypsis wackoo this thread is overwhelming !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gtlevine

Bill, sure does not look like Dypsis Tokoravina in P.O.M. Where is the red scaling so prominent in the P.O.M. book?, Jans palm looks white. What about the fact that the trunk is so large in the real species, this one looks smaller. And finally, leaves just don't look like Tokoravina. This puts me right where I usually am with Dypsis, confused.

Gary

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bgl

I'm increasingly getting the feeling that with Dypsis, the more you know, the more you also realize how limited your understanding is. For one thing, I'm convinced there's a lot of variability within certain species and maybe D. tokoravina is one of those. What a particular palm will look like depends on:

1) is it planted in full sun, or shade?

2) is it planted in close proximity to other palms?

3) what's the soil like? Plenty of soil, or rocky conditions?

Back when the Jurassic Park first was offered for sale (around 1996 here in Hawaii) they were sold as D. sahanofensis. As such, I assumed they were delicate shade palms, and planted a bunch of them in a few different locations, and in some cases very close together. Today, many of these palms look dramatically different when it comes to trunk diameter and overall height, and also in some cases, color on the stem/trunk (see my two photos in post #104). What IS a common thread among all of them is the fact that they all have the grouped leaflets described on p. 170 in POM. Admittedly, there are other Dypsis palms with this characteristic. Considering the obvious variability, I think it's a good possibility that the palm in Jan's garden could be a tokoravina.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
BS Man about Palms

I saw the embers cooling on this thread so I thought I should fan them! :D

Here is what was sold to me as "Big Curly" but this one is the most recurved, squat one I have seen, scratch that, Jeff Brusseau has one close I think. Anyway, It was pretty big in a 15 gal pot when I got it, fairly shaded under a tree. I didn't think the leaves could get any shorter..., BUT very stout! Been in full coastal sun for a couple years here, now in a box.

Any ideas?

post-27-1217562884_thumb.jpg

post-27-1217563007_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...