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nomolos

Garden Atmosphere

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nomolos

I am wondering what inspires us as gardeners to create different styles of tropical gardens. What garden has inspired you, what feeling or ambience do you want your garden to have?

Here are some pics of beautiful landscapes

Add you own pics, choose your favourite, discuss what about the particular pic you like or would like to emulate.

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quaman58

Sol,

A topic after my own heart. First, I love warmth and high (not oppresive) humidity. Like Hawaii. Shorts and flip flops all year 'round. But alas, San Diego has this darn thing called Winter, so my inspiration is to create as much of an ideal tropical effect as I can. Two questions are constantly in my mind as I plant: Is it more important to for me have the tropical "effect" of well placed palms and such?; or do I want to have a palm "collection" that is laid out like a botanical garden? I think in the end, the effect of being in the tropics is more important that the number of rare species involved. Having said that, of course I'm trying cram in as much of the "good stuff" as I can. :D Boy o boy, some day that Orania ravaka is gonna be big enough to support one end of a hammock. And if I plant this Hedyscepe about right about here...

Well, you get the idea.

Bret

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Walter John

Good question Sol, I was inspired by a gardening magazine woman on TV who had the biggest mish mash I've ever seen. It was so different from the norm that TV usually displays. She emphasised that gardening should be fun and to plant away and let your imaginative instincts take you, bearing in mind a few basic measures within your property boundary.

There that's a true story, my biggest inspiration, a gardening magazine guru lady who showed how it could be fun. It wasn't a jungle of palms, it was an array of plants thrown in, I loved it.

Amen

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I wanted a jungle feeling per above.

Edited by Wal

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ruskinPalms

My garden design is to create privacy in my densly built community. It is designed to give me the illusion of being in a clearing in a tropical jungle. I have a lot of palms planted densely in beds that run along the sides of my back yard with a fairly large open space in the middle that opens onto the pond. The effect has been good so far. No if only my neighbors would plant a palm or two on the other side of the pond <_<

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palmislandRandy

Mini jungle :D

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amazondk

I guess my ideal is like a Japanese garden. It should fit the local conditions to look natural while in essence being man made. I want my garden to be mixture of the rich native ecosystem here with well placed exotics that contribute to the overall feeling. At my latitude and altitude I really do not have to do much to feel tropical. It is pretty much impossible to get more tropical than where I already am at.

dk

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Jason Baker Portugal

My style is the tropical rainforest style. It doesn´t matter which plants they are as long as I get that style.

Jason

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ariscott

I was having a walk about 2 years ago... behind rural property I was renting at that time. There was a property backed up into sewerage easement - so they don't have back fence and it was beautiful!! From the front... we probably can't see the house. This is the kind of oasis... I want to have. Maybe less immaculate, because I won't have a team of gardeners maintaining my garden and less impressive house because I just can't afford a house like that... but you get the picture.

Since we are in the tropics, why would I create any other type of garden???

Regards, Ari :)

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Edited by ariscott

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_Keith

Wow, what a question. At this point this is the best I can describe it.

My first challenge is that I am a Plantsman, aka Plant Collector. Making any attractive garden with lots of "one offs" is always challenging. And I always plant things in locations best for the plants, not necessarily best for the vista. Of course I try to accomplish both, but plant health wins always in a conflict.

Then I want a garden that has the tropical feel, but does not lose the Louisiana southern sub-tropical-feel garden aspect. This is not as hard as it sounds, but one has to accept that the garden will look like crap for about 3 months of the year. Most gardens down here do.

Last I don't want a total nervous breakdown when the arctic blast finally comes, so I need a blend of conservative climate capable plants equal or greater than the number of risk-taker plants.

Lots more to be said here, but I guess you get the point. At the risk of saying more than folk want to hear, I will stop. Unless, of course, someone is dumb enough to ask for more :lol:

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The Palm Nut

Having spent many hours walking temperate rainforest of the west coast of Canada, Oregon, the tropical rainforests of Samoa, Hawaii, Asia, and North Queensland. And of course subtropical rainforests of NSW Australia. I never gave it another thought other than creating a subtropical/tropical rainforest of my own. And what a journey it has been! and continues to be.

At this stage of my rainforest what most reflects the atmosphere is "looking for light".

Cheers

Mike

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amazondk

Keith,

We have about 4 months of relatively dry weather. If you do not irrigate gardens get sort of stressed at this time. Temperature is never an issue, but water is. I guess that is a good reason to go native as our native plants are pretty well adapted to the local climate.

dk

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_Keith
Keith,

We have about 4 months of relatively dry weather. If you do not irrigate gardens get sort of stressed at this time. Temperature is never an issue, but water is. I guess that is a good reason to go native as our native plants are pretty well adapted to the local climate.

dk

Don,

Thanks. Here the 3 months are winter. Things like Alocasia and Banana melt down to the ground. Many tropicals die down to the roots. And then there is the normal deciduous thing. For me and Cel, winter is just a depressing time. But then comes spring and the magic of walking the garden and seeing something new everyday and the world comes alive.

I guess I have this love/hate relationship with winter. I know for sure I would hate the ones like you grew up with in Montana. But down here it is so short, it is kind of like a renewal. If I were in a climate like you have now, I wonder if I would miss it. I have no doubt, you don't miss a Montana winters or maybe you do, but here is quite a different experience than the winters up north. What really depresses me is the couple of months that are wet and dreary with lilttle sunshine. When spring comes, I truly feel alive again. I sprout just like the plants.

Keith

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rozpalm

The atmosphere I am trying to create with my garden is one that provides lots of cools grotto's to hang out in and to provide surprises with color and variety as the guest walks from grotto to grotto. I still have quite a way to go, but I am to the point that most people are usually speachless when they first walk into my backyard.

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Walter John
The atmosphere I am trying to create with my garden is one that provides lots of cools grotto's to hang out in and to provide surprises with color and variety as the guest walks from grotto to grotto. I still have quite a way to go, but I am to the point that most people are usually speachless when they first walk into my backyard.

Photos please and plenty of them thanks.

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bgl

Definitely a very interesting topic, since no two gardens will look alike! Given the opportunity, many of us can create something really different, and that in itself is obviously satisfaction enough. I feel that creating a garden is a unique artform, and a very fascinating one. Creating a painting or sculpture is an amazing feat in itself, but after all, when you're done, YOU'RE DONE! Your piece of artwork is ready for display and (hopefully) ready for others to admire. But, creating a garden brings art to an entirely new level since a garden is never done. Things will grow, and to make it even more interesting and challenging, everything will grow at a different speed. So, you need to take that into consideration. What will a particular area look like 5, 10, 15 years from now? AND, what will it look like from all the different angles that are available? Talk about challenges! But that's what makes it fun! :)

When I began designing our garden here, 12 years ago, I had a few things in mind that I wanted to accomplish:

1) create complete privacy

2) utilize most of the existing native Metrosideros polymorpha ("ohi'a") and Tetraplasandra hawaiensis ("ohe") trees in my landscaping plan

3) utilize the existing, very interesting, topography and leave as much of it as possible untouched

4) create as many specific areas as possible, each of which should be unique in its own way, and make each of them feel as if it were a creation all by itself (in other words, difficult to see one area from the next)

5) utilize as many palms as possible, preferably in groups

What made it even more fun was the fact that this was my first feeble attempt at anything like this! :D Recently, after setting up a little nursery on leased land next to our own property, I've also been asked to help others with their landscaping plans, so that gives me more opportunities to introduce Clinostigmas and other beautiful palms in the landscape here in the Hilo area.

Below are some photos showing a few areas, each unique in its own way:

1) our entrance from Malama Street. The main driveway is in a "S" shaped form, so you can't even see our house until you get to the last stretch heading up to the house. We actually give people directions of how to get to the house AFTER they enter our property. There have been cases of people making a wrong turn! :D

2) photo taken from our 60 ft long bridge which crosses a deep crack that runs diagonally thru the property. The crack is to the right in this photo, but difficult to make out (it's just to the right of the big ohi'a tree on the right). This area is about 6-8 ft below the rest of the adjacent property.

3) Marojejya darianii group planted below a large Tetraplasandra canopy tree. Tall slender palms on the right are Dypsis nodifera and D. pinnatifrons.

4) "Clinostigma cathedral" with C. samoense and Metrosideros polymorpha in the background.

Just found out that I can't add all four photos at the same time. Can only post two of them. BUT, when I click on "Add Reply" (presumably within 5 minutes), and add the other 2, they all become part of the same post!

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bgl

5) Seychelles Court, with various palms from the Seychelles. Most of the ones visible in this photo are Verschaffeltia splendida and Phoenicophorium borsigianum, but Roscheria, Deckenia and Nephrosperma palms are also part of this area. It's surrounded by taller ohi'a trees.

6) Vanuatu Walk with our Carpoxylon macrospermum grove (no other palms planted there). Most of the natural vegetation has been retained, including a few ohi'a trees (and one big one that fell a number of years ago and is now also part of the landscape).

7) Now we're getting to some of the more "manicured" areas that separate the more "natural" looking areas. This is part of our Madagascar section, with our pavilion in the background.

8) Our most open space - what we refer to as "the fifth acre" (which we bought in June 2001), primarily with larger palms. All the larger palms are Dypsis sp. bejofa.

And that's it for now!

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DoomsDave

What effect?

Good question.

I'm just trying to accomodate my passion for plants.

Eventually, the effect will probably be a cross between the Addams Family's mansion combined with Bo's jungle.

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ariscott
I have put together a presentation of my garden from its early stages to present with some music. My lovely wife of 30years singing and myself playing the guitar.

Just copy and paste the following

http://www2.palmpedia.net/wiki/index.php/I...L_17TH_2008.wmv

Cheers

Mike

Very nicely done... and cool song too.

Regards, Ari :)

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nomolos

Talking of rottos check these out

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Garden%200601-5%20CH%20Bog%20Garden.jpg

:drool::drool::drool:

more Grottos I don't know what rottos are

Garden%200601-3%20CH%20Lion%20Grotto.jpg

Garden%200601-4%20CH%20Dripping%20Well.jpg

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nomolos

[font=Comic Sans MS]A temperate green foliage garden

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nomolos

The hanging flowers frame the view

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Alpine style tropical garden

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nomolos

fern style foiage garden

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grass style

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nomolos

Japanese tropical

garden

Waterfall garden

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Colourfol Japanese Garden

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Tassie_Troy1971

Hi everyone !

I am just in the process of moving ATM and as the cooler weather is close enough to slow down any palm i plant i will have plenty of time to plan over the next 4 months what my palm garden will evolve into !

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Rusty on Pine Is.

Here at Jackass Flatts, I try for the semi jungle look, but the result falls short of the looks of Bo's wonderful photos. i aim for privacy and try to make a nice place to meditate. This shot is back by the ponds

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Walter John

Nice Rusty, very very nice.

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Alicehunter2000

I guess I'm going for the "Tropical/Mediteranian Resort look" Architectuarly Mediteranian house and hardscapes....with tropical look plantings. I want every day to feel like I'm on vacation..........and that requires alot of yard work :)

BTW......my spelling is atrocious this morning.

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nomolos

Meditation garden Japnese sryle

Tuttle%20Japanese%20Garden%20Spring%20Pond%20Portland%20OR%20NW%20USA%2096x4.JPG

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nomolos

Balinese garden

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nomolos

Ecclectic garden

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different again

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lush garden

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nomolos

Barbados Garden

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Really full garden

I like the lush green rainforest garden but with the harsh beach conditions it has been a difficult atmosphere to achieve.I am inspired by the gardens of Roberto Burle Marx.

My beach garden

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nomolos

Alluring garden

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mediteranean garden

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Sanctuary garden

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Subtropical garden

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nomolos

water garden

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Zen Garden

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Bamboo Garden

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nomolos

Woodland Gardens

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BobbyinNY

I would definitely have to say a Tropical Rainforest with a "resort" kind of atmosphere..... I want an organized jungle that combines hardscaping with lush tropical plants in a sort of orderly manner... not too orderly - but not where everything just blends into each other either.... I like to give some thought to placement.

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Neofolis

With my current garden, I don't really have the space to do anything creative or create any kind of setting, so I just want to fill it with as many palms as I can fit in. In the future, when I move somewhere with more space, whilst I like many styles of garden, I much prefer nature, so my goal would be to create something as natural looking as possible. I would avoid hard landscaping as much as possible and again try to keep planting as dense as possible, whilst still leaving enough space to get in amongst the plants, so that they can still be seen. I guess jungle effect or rain forest effect would be the closest description, but other than pairing species that would not be seen together in habitat, the main emphasis would remain natural or wild.

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