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daxin

Variegated Cycas revoluta

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daxin

I bought this variegated Cycas revoluta last week and subsequently had it hijacked by the first client of mine who saw it. The nursery owner thought this is just iron deficiency from a bad root or some kind of viral infection. I did see several others with similar variegation pattern but on some of them the variegated part is turing brown. PACSOA has an article on odd forms of Cycas revoluta and did mention that one type has variegation like this on new growth but will turn brown later in the year. I'd like to hear the experience from anyone who has grown this particular form of Cycas revoluta.

P3032886.jpg

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Kris

Dear Daxin Liu  :)

that cycas looks cool !  :)

thanks for the visuals...

love,

Kris  :)

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LJG

From what I read, I do not seeing how this can be Cycas revoluta var. aurea. My take is if you found this one with a bunch similar, it has to be a nutritional deal. The true plant is so rare it would not be just found. But who knows.

Pot it up. Water and fertilize it properly, and see what happens next flush or two.

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fastfeat

I agree with Len. I'd suspect a deficiency rather than a variegation. I'm sure someone with more experience could say for certain.

Looks cool though...

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Gbarce

I saw a website that was selling this particular variety of variegated Cycas Revoluta.

If I remember correcly it was a nursery based in Australia and they were actually selling the business.  Anyway they had a propagated this variety in the hundreds already and had them in commercial quantities.  

They had other form of variegation too.

I'll see if I can find the site again.

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Gbarce

Here's a picture from the site.

post-1017-1204716723_thumb.jpg

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BS Man about Palms

Price sure wants a lot for them. Yours does look the same.

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Mats

Len, here's a couple 15 gal. specimens I saw at Tropical Connection last year.  

2311873167_5bb030a3f3.jpg

2311873255_06f865801d.jpg

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fastfeat

Cool!!

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daxin

I guess I should go back and grab another one. This is a wholesale nursery and their plants came from Barcelo. Among the 100+ plants, there were 5-6 variegated ones.

For Len in Vista, this nursery has Pittosporum Tom Thumb in 5 and 15, but their staff told me that it is a fussy slow grower. Here is a picture of a few left-over 15g ones:

P2292872.jpg

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LJG

Just to point something out - I have seen many Sagos with this nutritional problem. It is common at places that do not take care of them. In fact I bought one from Art here in SoCal because I had a feeling it might have been Cycas Revoluta var. Aurea. I paid normal sago prices as Art did not know what var. Aurea was. Well, first flush was green and never changed. After that I learned my lesson why have a plant that is so expensive that can be imitated to the almost exact look by under potting and not taking care of it. :)

I hope yours is the real deal. I think you will know real soon with Spring coming.

As far as Pittosporum Tom Thumb, good find. They are a bear to track down in the states. No idea why. This cultivar has been around since early 90s in New Zealand. What did he want for those?

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Mats

(LJG @ Mar. 06 2008,05:15)

QUOTE
Just to point something out - I have seen many Sagos with this nutritional problem. It is common at places that do not take care of them. In fact I bought one from Art here in SoCal because I had a feeling it might have been Cycas Revoluta var. Aurea. I paid normal sago prices as Art did not know what var. Aurea was. Well, first flush was green and never changed. After that I learned my lesson why have a plant that is so expensive that can be imitated to the almost exact look by under potting and not taking care of it. :)

I didn't buy either of those at Tropical Connection because I thought it was a cultural issue and not true variegation.

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Gbarce

Hmmm.. Len has a point.  I was looking at the pictures on the Aureas in the website and the variegation/yellow seems to be limited to the very tips of the leaflets.

Still pretty hard to call though just basing it on pictures, but if you do go back I guess you should really look at the leaves very closely and look for clues.

But hey if its still priced like a regular sago then whats the harm?  just fertlize it well and you have a regular Sago.

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Redland

I agree with Len. Most of the ones I have seen with this type of varagation

grow out of it. Anyone had a Cycas Revoluta var. Aurea go through 2 or 3 flushes and maintain this?

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daxin

It seems that the consensus is that this is a nutrition related temporary effect. The other ones I saw had much shorter variegated tips but all seemed to be reasonably healthy.  I am surprised that no cycad growers has figured out how to induce this variegation controllably while not sacrifising the long-term health of these cycads. Maybe these pseudo-variegated ones will just die out if one tries to keep up the stress factor that is causing the variegation. In any case, I will go get another one to try for myself. Thank you all for the comments!

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Walter John

There's something that disturbs me immensely about the term "controlled variegation" and the sight of these cycads, but I can't quite put my finger on it.

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Kris

(Wal @ Mar. 07 2008,03:47)

QUOTE
There's something that disturbs me immensely about the term "controlled variegation" and the sight of these cycads, but I can't quite put my finger on it.

:D

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eastern.nurseries

Seed from Amami island can often produce kogane, of the two forms this is more usual. Some years ago Mark Sanders of Florida brought two ton of this seed from me so it is not surprising that these plants are starting to appear in nurseries

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neoflora

I have a couple of these plants. I have had them for years. I have been putting fertilizer on them trying to green them up. When they flush the entire leaf come out yellow-lime green color. Guess I got something.

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Mats

I wish Tom (cycadjungle) would chime in on this topic . . .

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daxin

I went back to the same nursery last Friday and here are some more photos:

First the block of 5g Cycas revoluta. Two variegated ones really stand out, but they seem to be a bit smaller than the rest.

P3072914.jpg

No. 1

P3072916.jpg

No. 2

P3072915.jpg

Here is a close-up on one of the variegated 2g ones. It seems that the new leaves do not have any variegation. Most likely fake variegation in this case.

P3072919.jpg

I ended up not buying any as I think it is better to wait for confirmation after the one I bought originally flushing out some new leaves.

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rhapis

Hi Daxin,

              Your cycad is definately Cycas Revoluta Aurea.

It also has more yellow than most I,ve seen.The new growth opens green and generally takes about 6 weeks to fully colour up.Nice specimen !!!

         Steve

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Gbarce

Daxin - I'd say go for it.  Worst case is you get an ordinary one that you bought at an ordinary price.

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virtualpalm

I would be interested in one of these -- perhaps in trade. Please contact me off list if interested.

Thanks,

Jody

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amazon exotics

Standard  variegation

yyy010.jpg

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JD in the OC

Dioon holmgrenii  :;):

dioonchair.jpg

dioonwhole.jpg

dioon.jpg

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Cycadcenter

JD,

That looks like a varigated spinulosum to me.

Bruce

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virtualpalm

I agree with Bruce; that is definitely Dioon spinulosum and not D. holmgrenii.

Jody

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BS Man about Palms

Heres what I found at Jungle Music this weekend.

varspin002.jpg

I'll stress it a bit more...(that should be no problem) and maybe the Variegation will return.

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Xavierdlc61887

i talked to a freind of mine and he said that its "That photo is a Revoluta with magnesium deficiency (not variegated, not aureo)" hes a real cycad pro so just throwing this out there so yall dont get suckerd into a regular sago :D

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LJG

(Cycadcenter @ Apr. 01 2008,14:38)

QUOTE
JD,

That looks like a varigated spinulosum to me.

Bruce

I think Justin add the  :;):  by "Dioon holmgrenii " because he was joking as he asked months ago in a thread if it was D. holmgrenii and everyone said spinulosum for sure. Either that or he is holding out hope it is a holmgrenii. :)

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JD in the OC

Nice find Bill...

The force is strong with you. :)

LJG,

I guess I'm holding out hope.

I am by no means a cycad expert, so I appreciate all the input from you guys.  Whatever Dioon it is, I like it just because of the variegation.

The grower I got it from said he grows his spinulosum in a completely different area and hadn't bought a batch of spinulosum seed for several years.  He did buy a more recent batch of D. holmgrenii, which he grew and kept separate.  He said "After checking my records and based on where you found it, I am 90% sure it is a D. holmgrenii".  That's not to say that seed doesnt' get mixed up- because it happens all the time.  So, for now I am going to go with the grower's opinion and call it a holmgrenii.

I may try to get the plant over to Whitelock's, or at least send him pics, to get his opinion.

Time will tell...

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