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    Silas_Sancona

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 05/22/2021 in all areas

  1. 41 points
    Pretty standard 1/4 acre. Lots of palm density. I left a few genus out of my list like Jubaeopsis and Polyandrococcos. Here are a few garden shots...
  2. 38 points
    As hard as you try, it is almost impossible to give that little one gal enough room when you first put it in the ground. It seemed like only yesterday for this Beccariophoenix alfredii.
  3. 36 points
    Good afternoon! Today I saw a Variegated Washingtonia in Tempe Arizona, in front of someone’s business. First one I’ve seen in person randomly around. Enjoy.
  4. 35 points
    This is my largest of 3x Tahina. please post yours with Dr Balasky for scale
  5. 34 points
    I have been growing many palm species from seed in the Arizona desert,for the last 25 years. Knowing that it takes me 15 years of growing under my extreme conditions just to produce a nice 5 gallon Coccothrinax,it was a no brainer to just pick this one up,when a local nursery brought in 18 of these old man palms. As of today,only 9 left... aztropic Mesa,Arizona
  6. 34 points
    I drove past a wholesale nursery south of Vero Beach yesterday with a section of Beccariophoenix alfredii. I know quite a few nurseries in Florida are field growing them now but I had never seen one. The most B. alfredii I have ever seen at one time.
  7. 32 points
    Feeling so fortunate to have had the opportunity to visit this island!
  8. 32 points
    When I saw this, I thought I was going to need a pacemaker. In all my years looking at palm parts and pieces, I have never seen anything quite like it. John Hovancsek and I were going through the garden when I removed an old leaf sheath off this Dypsis basilonga only to reveal the first spathe since planting. In this case, a picture is worth much more than a thousand words. Tim
  9. 31 points
    Many of you order from Floribunda, but mine was a relatively large order so I thought you might find it interesting to see my relatively large delivery. The reason it was large was because: 1) I'm completely redoing my yard front & back. 2) I like the "multiple" look with some of these. 3) My parents and sister would like some plants as well. 4) I'm paranoid I'm going to kill some of them, so ordered more than I need to "hedge my bets". Worst case I'll sell or trade the extra plants. Experience was same as has been described by others... Filled out the order form from website stock, got a call from Jeff to review the order (and get to know me), paid for plants before they shipped, and shipping/handling after they arrived (S&H was approx 35% of plant cost, which is fair considering most were in pots). Upon arrival I carefully unpacked the plants (which were packed amazingly well) and lined them up for their photoshoot. I used a ruler so I could track growth and measured the nicest plant of each type. Ruler was in 3-inch increments, measured from the TOP of the pot (not the ground). I'll post the photos here in case it's helpful for anyone else planning a Floribunda order (or "palm porn" for the rest of us). Night shots just to be different ;-) * If replying about a specific plant, try to include only that plant in your reply and delete the others (if you can). I'm curious if any comments. For me the "Pinanga Javana" was the biggest surprise (only 4" but HUGE). We repotted some of these already, and are excited to watch them grow over the years. Group photo: Bentinckia condapanna (1g): Burretiokentia vielillardii (1g): Chuniophoenix hainanensis (4"): Clinostigma savoryanum (4"): Cyphophoenix nucele (4"): Cyphosperma balansae (1g): Dypsis baronii (1g): Dypsis baronii “black stem” (seedlings) & Dypsis "lafamazanga" (seedlings): Dypsis lanceolata (1g): Dypsis leptocheilos (1g): Dypsis "maroantsetra" (1g): Dypsis onilahensis “weepy” (4"): Dypsis "orange crush" (1g): Dypsis pembana (1g): Dypsis saintelucei (1g): Euterpe edulis “orange crownshaft” (1g): Licuala distans (4"): Pinanga coronata (1g): Pinanga javana (4"): Pinanga philippinensis (1g): Pritchardia martii (4"): Verschaffeltia splendida (4"): Enjoy!
  10. 31 points
    Thought I might share a few pictures of my jungle!
  11. 31 points
    "You know you are a palm nut when..." - ... you have palm seeds germinating in your car's cup holder. - ... there are coconuts rolling around in the bed of your truck and you don't remember where you got them. - ... you take a palm book with you on a long flight. - ... you have a bucket of common palm seed in the back of your car, along with all the groceries. - ... you bring a wagon, wheel barrow, cart with you to a palm sale, along with a cooler loaded with a day's worth of drinks. - ... you take 75 photos of the same palm. - ... your pocket list of the species you have is replaced by a list of the species you want. - ... your pocket list of the species you want is replaced by nothing, because you have it memorized. - ... you've knocked on a stranger's door asking to collect seed from their yard. - ... you have given a palm as a birthday gift. - ... you have received a palm as a birthday gift. - ... you stop to identify a palm while riding your bike. - ... you bought a palm because it looked cool, only to find you have four more like it at home. - ... you have created your own style of hieroglyphic writing to identify the origins of all your palm seed via their tags. - ... you have a 1-gallon palm sitting within the rim of a 7-gallon palm which is sitting within the rim of a 25-gallon palm. - ... you need to use a flashlight to give a tour of your yard, at two o'clock in the afternoon. - ... the utility meter reader is scared to death of entering your property. - ... you've had to pull a dead animal from the spines of your heavily armed palm. - ... you've had to pull yourself from the spines of your heavily armed palm. - ... you have forgotten where you have planted a certain specimen. - ... you find a palm in your yard you do not remember planting. - ... you clean out the marginal area between your yard and your neighbor's only to find seedlings of ten different species. - ... after the garden tour, you need to draw a map to get the attendees to the exit. - ... the space between your potted palms has shrunk to zero. - ... the seedlings popping up in the yard, belong to a mature tree above, which was once a seedling itself, belonging to an even taller palm higher up. - ... you dream of palms, awake and while sleeping. - ... you can see the crown of your climbing palm and have no idea where it is planted. - ... you have generations of hybrid palms creating themselves in your yard. - ... you can't find the tags you used to label your palms, because they were replaced by another system of tags which you cannot find either. - ... your cold sensitive palms are better protected than your pets. - ... you have created a custom moving system to transport your oversized Red Sealing Wax Palm indoors and away from the cold. - ... you have no hot water because it's been diverted outside to heat your yard. - ... you have Christmas lights around your palms, weeks after December. - ... you talk to your palms and hope they don't talk back. I could keep going, but I gotta eat. Ryan
  12. 30 points
  13. 29 points
    I germinated these from seeds in 2006. I can’t believe how cool they’ve turned out.
  14. 27 points
    And my largest of 8. One of my favorites.
  15. 27 points
    This year, my beccariophoenix seems to have grown even through winter (Fresno, California). It's currently opening up a frond, despite cold, wet conditions barely topping 60F during the day and falling to mid-30s at night. (Notice some slight frost damage on the brugmansia foliage in the background on the right.) This palm came from @Perito a few years back (2018, I believe).
  16. 27 points
    I have made so many trips up and down US 101 that my little truck knows the way. I have favorite motels and activities at several different locales. Years ago I collected seeds of Howea forsteriana from a tree in a Ventura park. One of them is now ground planted in my SF garden, about four feet tall. So naturally, I always stop at this tree to look for seeds. Last week, upon my arrival there were not seeds, but hundreds of eophyll (first leaf) seedlings emerging through the bark mulch around the parent tree. These have no future in situ as the gardening staff will just string trim them all down before applying a fresh layer of bark mulch. What to do ?? One of the great benefits about getting old is that I don't give an EFF about what other people think! I had no tools and the tiny palms were well embedded in the decomposing mulch, resisting a gentle tug. I purchased a weeding fork and returned, with the fork and some plastic bags. I felt somewhat nervous, but hey, what could happen to an old, well-dressed white man in a public park ?? (sad commentary on policing and race) I escaped arrest, and here are the rescued seedlings. Most of them still have the seed attached, so high probability of survival. They have no future in my garden, but I love to grow palms from seed or small starts, and to give them away to friends and visitors to my garden. Anyone else with a similar confession ?
  17. 27 points
    Stopped to take some pictures while mowing the grass.
  18. 26 points
    Finally! An old tattered frond sloughed off the Dypsis hovomantsina. Mr. D. carlsmith dropped a frond a few weeks ago and made a display but now it has colored up with a red ring. Ooo là là! Nice contrast with the yellow! Elsewhere, in the spiny forest, Verschaffeltia splendida reveals a demure new leaf. I am enjoying these new purchases on the lanai as a spring arrangement together with the nest found on the ground. Soon they will take their chances in the garden. …and a couple of orchids that popped open recently. Post your spring colors here!
  19. 26 points
    Below is a recent picture of my big Archontophoenix maxima right outside my front door aglow in the light of morning Maybe share nice morning pictures of your plants?
  20. 26 points
    Well could not hold back and decided to make a run to a nursery I happened to visit just over a week ago. I know I may be pushing it a bit but decided I wanted to give it a try regardless as I have canopy and am on an island surrounded by water so fingers crossed. She was a bit of a pig to move at approx 500lbs and doing it by hand. Pulled her off the trailer using a tarp and then through the gate into the backyard that I am starting to landscape. Also planning a Koi pond beside it so it can help shade the pond and fish in the hot summers.
  21. 26 points
    As a lapsed and semi-observant pagan, I try to spend my day in the garden on the solstice and equinox days. Here are images from my garden, all made today. The view to the west with the crown of Cyathea medularis and Ceroxylon quindiuense Lepidorrhachis opening a new frond Bomarea multiflora Dypsis baronii 'Black Stem' from Bill Austin seed, obtained February 18th, 2018 closer image, same palm ground planting achieved this afternoon, D. baronii 'Black Stem' on the right and D. baronii 'Black Petiole' on the left (RPS seed) It was quite pleasant today, scattered light rain showers and temperature of 50F, or 10C.
  22. 25 points
    I was never a big believer in chamaedorea, but I think that's changed. For a z9b garden where frost is likely each year, they are the equivalent of the ultra-tropical pretty things we can't grow here. Here's my little chamaedorea corner today. I have a handful of elegans, some radicalis (a few trunking seedlings in there...) woodsoniana, cataractarum, benziei, seifrizii, oreophila hooperiana. I feel like now I need a few of those whole-leaf types like geonomiformis, metallica & ernesti-augusii.
  23. 24 points
    It was sometime in the early 80s when I saw my first Dypsis "Mealy Bug." The palm world was a buzz with a few new palms discovered and brought into cultivation, and showing promise for an ability to grow in more temperate climates. Difficult to find and buy, this palm epitomized the soon to be explosion of interest in the amazing palms of Madagascar and of palm growing and collecting in general. Fast forward 40 years and I never thought I would see the day where a beautiful example of this palm would pop up in a Lowes. Now it is in Hawaii, and it is labeled wrong as a "Dark Mealy Bug" (which is another rare Malagasy palm), but there are fewer rare palms growing here in Hawaii than are being tried in California and other marginal areas. So it still stuck me as somewhat of a milestone that other long time collectors might also appreciate.
  24. 24 points
    I hope this isn’t too many. I love taking photos at night.
  25. 24 points
    This is what you buy for yourself for your birthday. My wife shaking her head in disbelief that I'd buy more palms.
  26. 24 points
    Taking a rare break from digging, trimming and weeding I snapped some photos. Licuala mattanensis "mapu" has an easy time growing here so I have several. One is seeding and and I have some seedlings sprouted from the first batch. These strangely shaped seeds are bright orange when ripe. Nothing but nature growing these meaning no supplemental water or fertilizer. Iguanura tenuis nearby
  27. 24 points
    Today we took a drive over to Fort Myers to see the two palm parks in downtown FM. One of them, on Martin Luther King Jr Ave by the former railroad museum is now the home of two formerly wild Sabal palmetto Lisas that were rescued from an I75exit about 10 years ago. The taller of the two palms has been my avatar since I photographed them in situ in 2008. Those two palms have provided many 100s of offspring to members of PT since then. They continue to thrive in their safe home and have grown too tall for us to access seeds except by picking them up from the ground. I saw both palms are flowering and setting seeds about 6 months later than usual. I'd like to find more seeds but have no idea when they will be ripe. Guess I'll have to stay tuned. I took the following photos. Note that the taller palm sheds all its boots and has a bare trunk while the shorter palm hangs on to its boots. Sabal palmetto Lisa x2, Fort Myers, FL, 09/21
  28. 24 points
    Here is my parajubaea torallyi planted as a small 15cm seedling in March 2010. Growth rate has been very impressive and now is setting seed. My climate here is cool Oceanic temperate 500m from the water lowest ever temperature is -0.9 C ( 31 F ) summer highs are rarely above 78 F and winters average 10c - 16 c ( 50 - 60 F ) closest comparable climate is Carmel / Monterey area south of SF California. This palm is growing in deep very well draining sandy soil that has been enriched with organic compost and seaweed pellets. on Irrigation for 40 min every 4 days except winter and early spring the wettest part of the year.
  29. 24 points
    Boy, what can I say……….. Tim
  30. 24 points
    5 years ago I made my first Palmtalk post about my front garden, using a water rebate program from the state. The full post is here: Well, it's been five years and things have grown! I did add some things as well, but not as much as it appears. I hope you enjoy!
  31. 23 points
    Eight years ago life changed when I met Troy Donovan . He became a great friend and introduced us to the palm world and to a host of generous palm lovers. Here is the result. We have about 27 species of which 11 are chamadoreas. Occasionally a frosty still night in the dead of winter burns a few leaves but I am fighting back with four pedestal fans that I position the night before and they go on in the early morning to create a gentle breeze . Surprisingly it seems to work.Looking westLooking eastOne of our 4 Lord Howe species, lepidorrachisOne of our 4 Lord Howe species, lepidorrachisrhaphis excelsadypsis baroniich. Klotzschianach. Microspadixch. radicalislinospadix monostac ?ch. Metallica ch sartoriich. woodsoniana ch benzieich hooperianach glaucafolia h. belmoreana trachcarpus fortuneibutia odorata syagrus romanzoffiana hedysceperhopalostylis baueri ch glaucifolia dypsis baronii Brahea edulis Hedyscepe Looking northrhopalystylis sapidaHowea forsterianaphoenix robelleni parajubaea torallyi chamaerops humilis
  32. 23 points
    This is a little more than 6 years from a seedling. Quite impressed with their speed of growth in St. Augustine. I'm 5'10" so you can see how much taller it is than me.
  33. 23 points
    I found some nice Acoelorrhaphe wrightii on Hilton Head Island, SC. They look pretty good to me!
  34. 23 points
    Every morning, I get a warm sendoff and a wave from this Phoenix rupicola. I planted it sometime in 2014 or so. I love how it looks when backlit in either the early morning, or late afternoon.
  35. 23 points
    First discovered this flowering over a year ago now. It's been a slow process for this development. Unfortunately, the property had been sold so I'm not sure if I can follow this development of future flowers and seed. Hopefully so....
  36. 22 points
    I'm a member of a local Arizona Facebook group for palm enthusiasts. A member there found this coconut growing in Mesa, Arizona. I got permission to post the photos so I thought I would share here. My 22 year-old Arizona grown coconut is in a pot in my living room. I guess this person found the right outdoor spot! This inspires me to try again. I did notice a similarity to the famous Corona, CA coconut. Both are surrounded by concrete. I think that might be the key to survival.
  37. 22 points
    Wow, there are some talented photographers here! Just a few for now, quick snaps from my garden during a stressful time.
  38. 22 points
    As this growing season comes to its end, I've realized how much things have changed in the last 3 years after completely redesigning my tiny backyard space. Today has been overcast with showers, and I managed to sneak some pictures between rainstorms. I thought I would share some of these with you guys. First up is the sabal blackburniana from Phil. This sabal has gone through quite the transformation in the past year and a half or so. The fronds were first deeply divided almost appearing minor-esque and have slowly become more costapalmate and recurved (which I am not bad about!). Next there's the medium of the 3 Chamaerops in the back. This tiny thing has turned into a very full and seemingly very happy male chamaerops (flowered this past spring). The Larger of the 3 has filled out quite a lot. It has roughly 3.5 ft of trunk at this point - which is hidden by the plants below. This winter, or early spring I will update it of course. These seem to do a lot of "extending" during the cooler parts of the year - or maybe its just me? This blue butia I put in last April has grown in nicely and officially peaked over the fence this year. It was labeled as capitata, but considering the nursery, and the local population around that area were they are sold it would appear to be possibly catariensis. This trigeneric hybrid (BXJXS) or (JXBXS) was originally acquired from Michael at MPOM. It has been a complete pain to keep happy. Needs amble water, and a lot of extra potassium for some reason. . Bizzie from Phil has grown a lot as well. As the nights cool it transitions from being a bright blue/silver to a purple color during the winter. Triple Roebelenii - Not much to say other than its grown a bit more and this picture doesn't do it justice: NEXT:
  39. 22 points
    Here's a Pseudophoenix sargentii I grew from seed started about 20 years ago. They do well in the desert,but seem to grow much slower than under tropical conditions. Finally got it's first trunk ring,so growth should be speeding up at this point. I've grown dozens of this species and until a trunk is formed,I only get 1 new frond produced each year.After trunk formation,2 or 3 new fronds per year is the norm. aztropic Mesa,Arizona
  40. 22 points
    Thought I’d share a few photos of this handsome palm from Fiji. The crown shaft color is a dark chocolate to almost black. The only drawback is having to look up at them. Super tropical looking and fast growing. Please post more photos! Tim
  41. 21 points
    ... A bit proud of this one - D. album var. aureum. I like the swelling of the trunk and I am happy that it grows so well. Starting to look really nice - D. leptocheilos. A bit covered (and therefore protected I hope) - a young P. pacifica. A C. nucifera from a washed ashore coconut - the petioles are interesting with its very intense color. Filling in nicely - D. decaryi - this one is from our home, purchased a couple of years ago. Kind of packed in there but I don"t mind - in front my Indian C. nucifera and in the back another one from a nut I found at the beach. Heavily protected from all sides - H. ramsayi. (I have got three left but those are still potted.) A brave grower through all the years - E. guineensis. Probably a slower one over here - D. lastelliana. This one grows and grows while surrounded by many other plants - P. rupicola. Please don't mind the weeds - a very fast grower so far - B. nobilis. Despite its cramped spot and with not really many hours of direct sunlight - an already six ft./2 meters tall B. alfredii. Finally my small C. metallica grove on the backside of the house. It would be great to get them producing seeds. ... Al right, let's move to the bullpen...
  42. 21 points
    In my yard, I have a queen and some Livinstonias, Sagos , and sabals, but those were all given to me or collected. Today, I bought a 5 gallon Phoenix Robelleni from lowes for 20 bucks. Ill post a picture tommorrow, I repotted it and mulched it, I am so happy.
  43. 21 points
    A few pics of my front yard, focusing on a couple palms (Butia capitata, Trachycarpus fortunei), + large yuccas, large agaves. The agaves are about as tall as I am, the yuccas mostly taller lol. The front garden view shows trunks of tall T. fortunei and a large Yucca schottii in background, with blue Agave parryi in front, and A. salmiana var. ferox behind (large, dark green).
  44. 21 points
    Probably my little Butia capitata (Likely catarinensis) that exploded in growth this year.
  45. 21 points
    Don't know why I never noticed this before, but I picked up this flower spathe that was shed from a Dypsis basilongas today, and before throwing it on the compost pile I noticed that the inside had some color. So I opened it up to find this.
  46. 21 points
    Hi everyone, I have had the fortune to see some awesome palm gardens lately, looking good after a very wet spring which is unusual for this area. Photos aren't in any particular order, but these first few are from the garden of Will and Margaret Kraa...some of you may know them, but they have an impressive collection which has been thinned out a bit recently, which makes for better viewing IMO. This is in the suburbs of Brisbane. Plenty of lovelies there... Dypsis ambositrae Dypsis canaliculata
  47. 21 points
  48. 21 points
    Here is some photo updates on palms this year Left to right Trachy, Birmingham, Musa Basjoo, minor Waggy Spectabilis bamboo, colocasia groundcover Left to right Trachy, minor, Alocasia portora, needle, giant calla lily, coffee cups Getting some size waggy
  49. 21 points
    I heard about this large butia growing in the Raleigh suburb of Fuquay-Varina. I was already nearby so I thought I'd check it out and I took this picture of it yesterday. I also looked at in on Google Streetview and determined it was planted sometime between 2014 and 2016. That means it also survived our terrible 2018 winter with low temps in the single digits. This gives me hope for my butia in my Raleigh yard.
  50. 20 points
    These are the tallest I´ve seen around here. They are in La Coruña, Galicia. They are 10/12 mts tall. They must be pretty old , about 50/60 years old. https://www.google.com/maps/@43.3665127,-8.4044707,3a,75y,104.97h,98.27t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sx3rb65oOkNlPNK9nDu_Mtw!2e0!7i16384!8i8192 These ones were the first I spotted, in the late 1980s. Unfortunately they were chopped dowm in 2008. These ones were also chopped three years ago. They even had volunteers. I picked 60 seeds from this one last week. It is 7/8 mts tall. More. Another one An the last ones. Enjoy.



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