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  1. Silas_Sancona

    Silas_Sancona

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    kinzyjr

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    Eric in Orlando

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Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation since 02/23/2019 in all areas

  1. 28 points
    Got a Facebook Memory from 3 years ago when I was about 6 months into my Palm / Plants Craze, and its kind of crazy how fast my knowledge and new Passion has taken me. And how I really need to buy another Place so I can start on my next Garden ! I still got the backyard to finish but thought I would share. Enjoy
  2. 26 points
    It's been raining off and on this morning, so I've been looking through my recent photos and decided to do a New Leaf thread. Please add your own new leaf photos when you can. First up, Licuala peltata v. sumawongii. The huge round pleated leaves are stupefying. Dypsis coursii Dypsis 'Orange Crownshaft', 2 views Next, Dypsis "Dark Mealybug" backside view of new frond We all love the smell of a new Chambeyronia frond in the morning, especially v. Hookeri. Two shots of Calyptrocalyx pachystachys showing off their new leaves. I am especially thrilled to see this new Lemurophoenix frond opening to full size after some severe damage from the volcanic eruption down the street. Yesterday: Today: Post your fresh frond photos!
  3. 26 points
    Here are a group of Carpoxylon I planted in 2011. Did not expect long term survival, so planted in tight group. They have been doing great and alter my walks through the garden to see them, and the best seat in the house. I like them so much, I now planted a total of 10 throughout garden. What a beautiful palm!
  4. 24 points
  5. 24 points
    One of our members took a few pieces of my fallen Caryotas of Damocles and had them turned into bowls by a wood shop. I thought they were pretty neat. I'll let the member out himself as the maker if he's so inclined.
  6. 23 points
    Dypsis canaliculata shed a frond overnight, and begged to have a selfie taken. What a show-off! (Photos have not been enhanced.) Estimated length of frond, 16 ft. D. canaliculata has elbowed aside D. prestoniana in my “favorite Dypsis” category, though both are impressive.
  7. 23 points
    They belong to this Tahina which is reaching for the sky....
  8. 23 points
    These guys are 8 yrs old from 3gal Lowe’s. They are well over 10’ and love being right next to the lake
  9. 22 points
    Since I'm American, and Red, White, and Blue are our colors - this grouping is apropos. But nice to look at for any nationality.
  10. 21 points
    Hello there, while my ladies went out for a school basketball event I asked my son if he would like to see a "jungle trail" and he said yes - so here we go. I have been there five or six times but never posted any pictures - I was honored to show this place @bgl in November last year - so, I think it is about time to let the palm talkers know. The location is on one of our smaller neighbor islands - this time Kurima island - which are all connected via bridges with the main island Miyako. This photos was taken on Kurima, looking back to Miyako island. Parking the car and entering the trails's entrance. Arenga palms are welcoming you soon. The trail itself is a ravine between a huge limestone on the right (towards the islands center)... and a several meters high limestone barrier on the left - between the sea and the ravine. The result is an almost untouched habitat, naturally protected from typhoons - which is the most important fact - and regarding the non-welcoming parking area probably almost unknown to any tourist coming down here... Ok, let's go on. Just beautiful - Arengas are everywhere. Thick boscage with Arengas all around. ... Moving on... But still breathtakingly beautiful... A paradise. Finally, here they are... ...flowering Arengas. I have to confess that I took seeds several times but I never ever got one of them sprouted. Interesting is those palms are never sold over here, so I have to keep going to find my luck right here at the source. Reaching the end of the trail, here some Noni-trees in the wild... Turning around, you can see the huge limestone (now) on the left and the barrier on the right - the trails goes right through it. Another 180, same position - the open sea. Looking back again and focussing on the limestone rock, cycads all around. Walking back to the parking area, still enjoying the scenery... ...here a single Papaya tree... ...but still admiring the countless Arenga palms. Ok, after enjoying this wonderful spot while taking my time to look around carefully/take photos here and there, my son and I enjoyed at least another hour at the island's beautiful shore Al right - thank you very much for your time and my apologies for the low photo quality, I just had my phone with me - best regards from Miyako island/Okinawa Lars
  11. 20 points
    Hi, here is my Brahea armata. Planted from pot to the ground 13 years ago, in 2006. Last winter was the first time ever with zero protection at all. The coldest temperature of Winter 2018-2019 here in the City of Basel was only – 4 °C (February). April 2006 April 2019, with me for scale hands up
  12. 20 points
    I am thrilled to announce that we are launching our updated website to bring Floribunda into a new era of clarity and communication, including: An interactive price list that is searchable, filterable, and updated consistently. New pictorial diaries highlighting the palm adventures of Jeff and Suchin around the world A new section containing ultra-rare mouth watering collector's items from Jeff's personal collection Plant pages with original photography and information regarding the palm. Click on the name of the palm in the price list to learn more about each palm, or search for your favorite species in the menu section of any page. New holy grail palms added to the list to celebrate the launch such as Chambeyronia lepidota and Anthurium salgarense. Integration of social media for a more personal experience of life at Floribunda. This is a work-in-progress and will be updated constantly with new photos, features, and plants for sale. We welcome you to explore the new site and give us your feedback about what you like/dislike, as well as features you'd like to see implemented in the future. Thank you for your support of Floribunda Palms & Exotics! http://floribundapalms.com
  13. 19 points
    If patience is a virtue, then I feel I've finally won some sort of a prize! These two D. carlsmithii were planted out from small cones back in late 2008 and honestly, I'm surprised they even survived. They have chugged along steadily, getting fatter, taller, more colorful, and finally started trunking. Actually, slow to trunk is a good thing, as it adds more time to enjoy what will become a fairly large palm. Being at eye level for such a long time gives plenty of time to admire such a special palm.....surely that's the real prize. Tim
  14. 19 points
    I brought my coconut outside for its annual shower! It gets dusty indoors here in Phoenix, AZ. This is my pride and joy. This palm is where my screen name comes from. I bought it from Home Depot in the summer of 2000. It's been moved around the valley from house to apartment back to house a total of 7 times. It gets so neglected I really have no idea what's keeping it alive. It's never been fertilized with anything but dirty aquarium water. I only started doing that in the past 4 years. It's never been repotted. I just fill in the top with new soil when it gets low. It sat in a dark apartment for a few years. It's almost always parked under an AC vent. It currently sits by a south facing window that only gets direct sun in winter. I used to have king palms and foxtails in pots sitting right next to it, but they did not survive. The small pot next to it is a dying coconut. In fact, that little one is the 4th one I have tried. The previous 2 died in about a year. This thing is a miracle and I hope it outlives me because it is truly like a child to me. I've often thought about putting it out on the patio you see in the photos. It's south facing and gets shade all summer. I'm just afraid of killing it. It seems happy indoors. I only remember one or 2 leaves ever turning brown. The lower ones usually get chewed by my escaping parrot or jumping dog or just break from the weight. You can see in the pictures I have it staked to keep it from falling over from the weight. I just can't show this beauty off enough. What can I say? I'm a proud dad!
  15. 18 points
    Hello all, i wanted to share this video that Robin Crawford made after his tour here in 2016. It has fantastic drone footage and is a great example of being on a garden tour with Jeff. The still photos within the video were taken by Linda Walker. We will be doing more videos like this in the future so stay tuned! He also graciously provided timestamps for all the species in the video, which i will paste underneath the embedded video: Licuala cordata 3:41 Pinanga speciosa 4:34 Carpoxylon macrospermum 5:16 Cyphophoenix nucele 8:21 Satakentia liukiuensis 9:13 Mauritia flexuosa 10:10 Reinhardtia compacta 10:47 Physokentia thurstonii 12:22 Bactris militaris 13:15 Dypsis sp. rosea x mirabilis 14:12 Areca montana (latiloba) 14:36 Sclerosperma mannii 15:00 Dypsis carlsmithii 15:47 Dypsis saintlucei 16:36 Hydriastele beguinii 17:25 Bentinckia condapanna 18:16 Dictyosperma furfuraceum 19:27 Dypsis malcomberi 20:00 Masoala madagascariensis 20:20 Lemurophoenix halleuxii 21:03 Dypsis leucomalla 21:52 Neoveitchia storcki 23:30 Pholidocarpus macrocarpus 24:31 Johannesteijsmannia magnifica 25:21 Dypsis bejoufa 26:23 Marojejya darianii 27:21 Dypsis mananjarensis 29:16 Licuala mattanensis 31:00 Ceroxylon amazonicum 31:42 Iriartea deltoidea 32:16 Areca ipot 33:10 Dypsis basilonga 33:51 Dypsis prestoniana 34:38 Pelagodoxa henryana 35:37 Cyphophoenix alba 36:12 Dypsis robusta 37:14 Dypsis hankona 38:01 Hydriastele flabellata 39:07 Dypsis leucomalla 39:42 Dypsis nauseosa 40:30 Loxococcus rupicola 41:39
  16. 18 points
    Yes, you can grow a lot of nice tropical palms around TB. There are a lot of nice private gardens around the area. Here are a few from the garden. Licuala peltata var sumawongii, These have been remarkably cold hardy, but hate hurricane winds. A couple of Satakentia that are around the garden. Copernicia's are always a good bet for central FL, just wish I would have planted more sooner. Here are a couple of C. macroglossa. Copernicia baileyana Copernicia baileyana that consistently weeps. I am beginning to think it is a hybrid. Something you don't see too often, Livistona jenkinsiana. Probably the best looking Livistona's. Originally bought from the late and great John Demott (Redland Nursery), about 20 years ago. Acrocomia crispa (Cuban belly palm), just starting to get its belly. They are painfully slow the first 4 - 5 years then can double in size in 1 year.
  17. 18 points
    It was a beautiful day so just thought I would share this pic I snapped while working on the new planting’s.
  18. 18 points
    Just a hobby house for a back yard grower, but finally up and operational!
  19. 17 points
    More silver goodness...Copernicia hospita And more...
  20. 17 points
    I love taking a shower on a beautiful morning. Probably go through to much water though.
  21. 17 points
    Here's one of the dressage farms down the street from me. It's 15 acres / 6 hectares which they've owned since 2001. It's a nice mix of palms, bromeliads, flowering trees, and open space.
  22. 16 points
    My little Dypsis manajarensis is looking sweet today. Going on 7 rings of trunk soon This palm has been a solid grower for me in the Fairview garden. Carl Crabil for scale
  23. 16 points
    More Copernicia goodness... What do these large petioles belong to???
  24. 16 points
    Hedyscepe, currently my all-around favorite palm !
  25. 16 points
    I visited the Ria Lagartos Biosphere Reserve in Yucatan Mexico, with the mission to see Pseudophoenix sargentii in habitat. And what a beautiful habitat! Thousands of them growing along a beach with the turquoise waters of the Caribbean behind. There were also some very straggly looking Thrinax radiata growing there as well. The ground cover was very thorny and difficult to walk in without getting cut up. Luckily I had my drone with me and was able to get a lot of good footage without having to walk too much in the thorns. There was also a pink lake behind the beach that a lot of tourists visit (Las Coloradas), it is a salt pan used for salt production. Here's the drone video:
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