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Showing content with the highest reputation since 04/10/2021 in Posts

  1. 16 points
    The Dypsis Prestoniana Hybrid is one of my favorite plants in the garden. It is at the perfect height to really enjoy it right now. The downside to how fast it grows is that soon it will be too high up to really appreciate it. this was planted from a 2 gallon pot, less than 3 years ago! Dypsis Prestoniana are fast here, but this hybrid is a rocket. Heres a Prestoniana planted out from a 1 gallon pot about the same time. Hard to tell scale but probably 10’ tall to the tallest point. I’ll try to update this thread with some more Dypsis pictures from the garden. As time and lighting allows.
  2. 15 points
    It’s a beautiful sunny morning here in Hilo (a nice change from an extremely wet month of March). This section of the garden was begging to be photographed in the morning sun. The three tall palms in the photo above (from left to right) are: Dypsis sp. Mayotte, Dypsis Pembana hybrid (probably w/ madagascariensis) and Dypsis Prestoniana Hybrid (also most likely crossed with Madagascariensis). In the foreground toward the left is what we are hoping is the true Dypsis Tokoravina.
  3. 15 points
    I've found that empty parking lot tree squares make good spots for guerrilla planting. They usually have or had drip systems installed, and the original planting has died for whatever reason. Sometimes,the landscapers will eventually remove your planting, and some times, they actually get stolen if too unusual for the area.Out of 18 one gallon size palms I grew from seed and planted 15 years ago at local parking lots,5 palms are still alive to this day. aztropic Mesa,Arizona
  4. 13 points
    I’ve got lots of palms closer to my house than that and I’ve never had a problem. Each palm has grown out slightly away from the wall and has cleared the eaves, barely.
  5. 11 points
    Maybe Areca catechu alba Orange Areca vesteria. These are pretty high. Used a telephoto lens to get a closeup. Red Areca vesteria Cyrtostachys renda. Again, these are on the tall side. Camera is pointing up. A recently added Neoveitchia storckii A group of Normanbya normanbyi A small Johannesteijsmannia altrifons
  6. 11 points
    I’ve been mulching since before there were palms in the ground. Now, there’s a jungle of palms and other plants competing for water and nutrients but they all are getting along.
  7. 10 points
    I’ll close with some companion plantings. Ravenala madagascariensis, Travelers (not really a) palm with a large tree fern. The very tall (40-50 ft) tree ferns give the whole place the feel of dinosaur habitat. Very few places in the developed world can grow these. Non-native tree ferns are controversial in Hawaii because of their potential to escape cultivation and become invasive weeds. But I love them. HTBG has a large collection of rare heliconias. Not many were blooming on this visit, but they are often spectacular. So on your next visit to the Big Island, be sure to see HTBG for yourself. Maybe you will catch a sunny day.
  8. 10 points
    Edge of the Archontophoenix forest. A quartet of Pigafetta that are probably close to 100 ft (30m) tall. The crowns of fronds are quite large. They only look tiny because they are so high. Not far behind is a trio of Veitchia joannis that are maybe 80 ft (25m) high. Dan Lutkenhouse Sr. apparently loved Licuala grandis more than just about anything else. Dozens are growing in the garden. They resemble Sabinaria but without the slit dividing the circular fronds. I didn't see many other Licuala species in the collection. Another unlabeled Licuala. Kerridoxa elegans is about 12 ft (4 m) tall. I think this is a Corypha. The fronds are about 8-10 ft (3 m) in diameter. It is planted away from the trail, so it hard to get a clear photo.
  9. 10 points
    There is a small grove of maybe half dozen Phoenicophorium borsigianum around a lily pond. These are about 30 feet (10 m) tall. I don’t know where else you could find trees of this size outside the Seychelles. Another Seychelles favorite is Verschaffeltia splendida, probably over 40 ft (13m) tall. Once they get really tall, the entire leaves get torn by the wind. Finishing up the Seychelles species with Deckenia nobilis. The sheath holding the developing inflorescence always reminds me of Audrey 2 from Little Shop of Horrors. Chambeyronia macrocarpa from New Caledonia. Carpoxlylon macrospermum from Vanuatu. This is an exceptionally beautiful species. From comments on PT it seems that the perfect microenvironment is needed to grow this in California and Florida. It thrives in Hawaii where you can count on them to develop a distinctive swollen base.
  10. 10 points
  11. 10 points
    Here you may find how my supermarket bought coconut developed in 5 years time. Enjoy
  12. 9 points
    As the clock counts down the final days here in Arizona, and more of the house is boxed up, some final scenes from some of the special places i've had the opportunity to explore while living here, while still in town. While not sizzling through another summer will be welcomed, other things enjoyed in the time here will be missed until the next opportunity to return and explore more comes. In part 1, some spring scenes from a favorite neighborhood escape, Veteran's Oasis Park. A gem in the heart of Chandler. As referenced to in the past, this 117 acre park also serves as a ground water recharge site and is a big draw for local.. and not so local birders and has boasted several sightings of extremely rare birds that pass through. The park offers up a fishing lake, numerous paved and more natural grit and gravel trails, and an environmental education center.. all with views of the San Tan Mountains ( and Regional Park ) and more distant views of the Superstitions/ mountains to the east ( esp. on clearer, less dusty days ) from atop one of the two easy to hike hills in the park. Plant diversity within the park is decent, though there is plenty of opportunity to " add more to the palate ", so to say. Can see a few Montezuma Cypress, and regionally native Ficus -from further south in Sonora or Baja- hanging out on the natural bank of the fishing lake, or near one of the recharge ponds.. along with group plantings of Brahea / Sabal Uresana here and there.. ( Plenty of the other palms in surrounding neighborhoods ) among other thoughts.. Regardless, a great spot to enjoy a picnic, or simply take in " suburban " nature, not too far removed from the less tamed desert nearby. Spring flowers: Opuntia englemannii var. lindheimeri ' Seguin ' Opuntia " Santa Rita " ( pic. # 1 ) One of the larger, single specimens i've seen locally. Yerba Mansa, Anemopsis californica. Tough but very tropical looking desert oasis native. Sunny yellow start of Palo Verde Season.. A nice patch of Chuparosa, Beloperone, ** formally Justicia** californica. The two forms of Brittlebush, Encelia farinosa.. Typical form w/ yellow disc flowers, E. f. farinosa ( pic. #1 ) and E. f. phenicodonta with dark brown disc flowers ( pic. #2 ). One of a few decent Fremont Cottonwood, Populus fermontii scattered around the fishing lake/ recharge ponds. What a sight local rivers would have been before so much of the riparian woodlands lining them, inc. tall Cottonwoods were chopped down/ water diverted. Random pics. and the desert stream/ waterfall i wish was rolling through my backyard, lol.
  13. 9 points
    I think this was my first visit to Fairchild Tropical Garden, June 1977. Not a good photo--I was doing better Kodachromes with my Minolta, but it's enough to give a feel for how the famous group looked back then. Me? I moved to Wyoming in April 1978
  14. 9 points
    I encountered difficulties with posting photos, so here the are, via comments.
  15. 9 points
  16. 9 points
    I will call this semi-guerilla gardening. The beach I frequent has two miles of undeveloped coastline. Coconuts in various conditions land on the beach along with seaweed and debris. Sometimes they sprout and grow on their own, sometimes they need a little help. There was a ranger I knew many years ago who patrolled this beach. He told me how he would toss coconuts he though might be viable up into the dunes to hopefully sprout and grow. I have made a habit of doing the same thing while walking the beach and sometimes bury them if I can find a soft spot in the sand to dig with my bare hands. These are two coconut palms that I found on the beach just starting to sprout. Knowing they wouldn't survive long on the open beach I relocated them a bit further from the water. The bigger, older one flowered for the first time this past year but produced no fruit. It is just starting to form a bit of trunk and develop that coconut lean. The smaller is a few years younger. They are totally exposed and receive no maintenance at all. They look a little shabby coming out of winter but are doing quite fine in this harsh environment. I have planted a few other coconut sprouts and other beach visitors do so as well. There are many coconuts here that have obviously been planted by somebody besides myself. In the background of the first photo is one such youngster.
  17. 9 points
    I think it will be fine. I try not to put thick mulch against to trunk but about 6 inches away I make it thicker sometimes up to 6 inches thick. I would pull some away from the trunk and just leave a thin layer and make it thicker away from it so it doesn't cause fungus on the palm.
  18. 9 points
    A stream runs through it... Now just imagine a few groups of Brahea and/ or Sabal uresana along it..
  19. 9 points
    These are my two Kerriodoxa. This is a solitary palm species. Very slow growing. Front Yard, 2012 Back Yard, 2018, 2020, 2021
  20. 9 points
    (461) The strip - YouTube across the street from me, everything grown from seeds from my garden.
  21. 8 points
    This might be more appropriate in the travel log forum, but I rarely look at that, so I'll post here even if it bends the rules a bit. After more than a month of unusually heavy rain, the skies over Hilo finally cleared in early April. I decided to celebrate the sunshine by heading up to Hawaii Tropical Botanical Gardens just north of Hilo. It had been closed during the pandemic, but reopened April 1. They have rebranded themselves as Hawaii Tropical Bioreserve and Garden. This is an amazing place and the first destination locals take visitors. If you have not visited it before, you should check out the website to learn about its history. https://htbg.com Basically, in 1977 a retired couple from the mainland, Dan & Pauline Lutkenhouse, bought 17 overgrown acres of abandoned sugarcane plantation with badly degraded and eroded soil and transformed it into what looks like pristine tropical rainforest. It is amazing that a massive forest can regrow in only 40 years. A similar botanical resurrection was achieved by poet William Merwin on Maui. This is the kind of thing most PT members dream about doing. The fact that this is even possible, and so quickly, provides a thread of hope much of the damage to the world's tropical forests could be reversed if people simply stopped cutting it down or burning it. Few of the palms have name tags, so my identifications are just my best guesses. But most are pretty obvious. Although there are thousands of palms on the property, 80-90% are the common Archontophoenix alexandrae. These may have been seeded by helicopter to control erosion of steep gulches. The palm collection is almost totally devoid of any Dypsis. Don’t know what was behind that decision. In no particular order... A mature Pelagodoxa henryana loaded with fruit greets visitors on the steep boardwalk down to the garden. The three monstrous Metroxylon amicarum at the bottom of the boardwalk have been shown many times on PT. Here I’ll just zoom in on the enormous crowns loaded with fruit. The ground underneath the trees is covered with fallen fruit. It’s heartbreaking to see it going to waste when so many people would love a chance to try germinating them. Of course, collecting any plant material is completely prohibited.
  22. 8 points
    In Arizona,the native palo verde tree puts on a spectacular display of yellow flowers every spring. Can be breathtaking to see some of them in person. It's green bark also aids in photosynthesis. aztropic Mesa,Arizona
  23. 8 points
    All of my Phoenix palms did the exact same thing and they are all coming back. I would give it some time and pour some h2o2 if you haven't already done so. Here is a picture of one of my palms shortly after the freeze. All the spears pulled and it smelled rancid. Here is the same palm taken 4-7-21 already starting to grow. And here is it on 4-12-21
  24. 8 points
    Pic 1 - P. Canariensis. Doing great. Been pushing lush new growth for weeks already. Pic 2 - Filibusta (parent palms reportedly survived a 6b winter). Doing great. Pushing several fronds. Pic 3 - Robusta. Disappointing. Not doing well despite the protection. It pulled a spear and the base feels a bit soft. The former spears were practically pushed out (I couldn't pull them 4 weeks ago) so something is going on down there. Made a little enclosure above the center to prevent water from coming in. I am giving it 50% on a long and healthy life. Pic 4 - Butia. Doing good. Slowly pushing fronds.
  25. 7 points
    I am back in Virginia for a few more years. Here are some unusual palms that I have grown for many years that are now in my new yard. My soil is mostly sandy with some loam, and fairly moist for sandy soil. Inground I have chamaedorea microspadix, jubaea, parajubaea sunkha, mule, serenoa, and needle palms. I have a lot of other hybrids in pots and unusual species for this far north. I've had many of them for 20 years, but mostly in pots. I didn't even need to protect most of them this last winter, since it didn't drop below 23 F, which is unheard of for here. I will probably plant some chamaedorea radicalis soon. The Jubaea was sold to me as a hybrid, which it is not. It is over 10 years old and about 7 feet wide. The sunkha is about 6.5 feet tall. The mule is around 9 or so feet tall. God bless
  26. 7 points
    Very interesting bromeliad that has some of the darkest leaf color. Small red flowers hang down. The color is actually very dark Burgundy / maroon. But don't let this little bit of sunshine fool you its a spreader and looks best in a hanging basket or in a container sitting on a plant stand to let the long leave to hang down naturally. First two are my photos... inside my messy greenhouse, lol.
  27. 7 points
    I got the Chatham Island seeds Pogobob at the start of the thread (Robert De jong ) was kind enough to send me some in 2009. Also have seen the Mother tree 2 x on visits to California. Here are my two grown from seed in 2009. They are faster growing than my other Nikau and have beautiful silver petioles.
  28. 7 points
    It takes years but yes, compost and mulch breaking down will nourish and soften the soil. I can dig a 5 gallon hole with a bare hand in most of my yard despite it originally being clay. Years of compost and mulch did the trick.
  29. 7 points
    I have done some guerilla gardening mostly by tossing seeds from my own mature palms. Thrinax radiata produce abundant seed, germinate easily and are almost native to this area. I have probably tossed thousands of seeds in many places over the years. These are a few I know about that have sprouted. No doubt there are many more that I have not located. These have survived and are thriving without any supplemental irrigation. They get no maintenance other than the pleasure of my company when I visit them but they are in a fairly shady area so that helps. I would like to guerilla some Coccothrinax argentata. I believe they were at one time native in this area. There are some growing naturally in other parts of coastal Broward County. I don't have access to a pile of seeds so I'm growing some along to plant out.
  30. 7 points
    You see both planted everywhere here. Sweet Acacia planted directly across the street finish up just as the P.V.s start flowering. Agree the smell of the Acacia is nice wafting into the house in the evening when the windows are open. There's another form that flowers earlier than others.. Often starting in January, finishing up as the standard form flowers. Stays much smaller /denser as well. A few of the many flowering P.V.s in the neighborhood on this side of town, and they're just getting started:
  31. 7 points
    1/6 protected triangles has a partially green leaf. The rest have stiff spears Some of the washy weeds performed really well
  32. 6 points
    I'm sure the consulting gig was for the construction of the Marina and Ferry terminal which happened sometime in the mid 70's. That pretty much kicked off the development of the Bald Head Island area, and it went from essentially uninhabited to golf course/expensive real-estate. No ponies, but I can assume nearby islands such as sheep, horse, and goat were named such for a reason. Palms still look a little rough out there now. I supposed hurricanes and constant salt spray take its toll.
  33. 6 points
    Lightly poke a twig into the hole and see when you get some resistance. Mark the distance (or just break the twig to the exact length) and see if the distance gets shorter in a few days. It is very possible its just actively pushing out bad spears. The ones lying on the ground didn't look very good so good riddance.
  34. 6 points
    Ben, my tanga’s are finally producing viable seed which take, what seems forever, to ripen, I’ve been using the sphagnum moss baggie method which works well. The seed is so small it seems to be an easier way to keep track of them. They have grown well and have slowed down after initial growth. It’s nice that they aren’t large palms and maintain a manageable scale. They’re susceptible to scale, but regular care keeps things under control. They respond rather quickly to fertilizer, in fact more than just about all the palms in the garden. Impressive palms overall. Here are some recent photos. Tim
  35. 6 points
    Walking around the yard weeding and watering and thought I would share some of what I have growing. Needle palms, sabal minor mccurtain, sabal minor, sabal Birmingham, various opuntias, yucca rostratas.
  36. 6 points
    Some update almost 2 months after the big freeze. Note temps went down to 3F and we had several days below freezing (not to mention the ice, snow etc...). All the palms in these pictures received the same treatment (all fronds cut but one spear, fleece blankets, frost blanket, etc...). Other than the triple hybrid, none of the palms were protected by a heat source. Pic 1 - the triple hybrid (But x Jub)x But) x Syagrus). The new spear is firm and I have no doubt this one will be do just great this summer. I have another, smaller, one that I didn't protect that well and it does not look good (spear pull and no sign of growth yet). Pic 2 - Sabal Palmetto. I probably didn't even need to cut this one but it was at a very exposed spot. It's doing great and pushing several fronds. Pic 3 - W. Filifera (pure). Doing great.
  37. 5 points
    My mom and I went Wednesday. Here is a pic with us to show scale to the anthurium. I am so glad this place is now open. Hit me up Rick next time you go, this place never gets old
  38. 5 points
    I’ll go off topic a bit to show that just like in a real tropical rainforest, HTBG contains many huge hardwoods that provide a massive canopy 100+ ft (30 m) high. The photos cannot capture the size of these trees, but I’d estimate that they are all 100-120 ft tall. Maybe more. Ceiba pentandra (Kapok) This tree develops enormous buttress roots to support its massive size. This tree was planted around 1990 and after 30 years the trunk is about 4 ft in diameter and 100+ ft tall. The third photo was lifted off the web to show how big they get in habitat. Schizolobium parahyba (Bacurubu). This also started around 1990 and is enormous. It likewise produces buttress roots to keep it from toppling over. I think I just missed it blooming. It drops its leaves, then brilliant yellow-orange flowers open for a week or two, then the new leaves come out. Mango. These are just frighteningly huge trees. Super fast growers. William Merwin planted mangos on his barren property to establish a bit of shade when he started his reclamation project in Maui. Several decades later the huge mangos shaded everything to such a degree that the palms were stunted. At great expense, the mango trees were removed from the forest allowing the palms to take off. I have no idea which species of ficus this is, but it is enormous.
  39. 5 points
    Funny story with palmettos I had a couple of weeks ago. There was this palmetto tree near me that had some seedlings beside it. I dediced to go dig them out and plant them. This being my first time digging out seedlings and the fact they were growing in the almost pure clay soil of the piedmont the roots got damaged. They lost a good portion of the root system ( it’s ok I got a bunch only 2 got damaged) and I wasn’t super confident they’d survive. So I put them in a palm cactus potting soil mix ( much better then the clay they were growing in) and left them in side. I cut off a good potion on the fronds on them to increase survival rates and for humidity I would leave them near the shower when I showered. As expected the remainder of the frond shriveled up but only on one of the 2 palmettos, Surprisingly enough it was the least damaged one. The roots didn’t brown up though so I was still somewhat confident and now the palm is starting to show more green. This and many other qualities of sabal palmetto make me believe it is the toughest palm in the world.
  40. 5 points
    Here’s another of my Laelia in bloom today 2/14/21 in San Francisco
  41. 5 points
    Talking about pythons, this fellow was hanging around a week ago. Darwin Carpet Python, Morelia spilota variegata, also a juvenile. Although the most common python here, you don't see them moving around all that much. They mainly seem to pick a spot to hang in and stay there for the day, sometimes two days.
  42. 5 points
    Found this little fellow wandering around last night, juvenile Children's Python, Antaresia childreni, only around a metre long. It's one of four species of python I find on my place.
  43. 5 points
    My med fan palm suddenly grew after aborting several spears in a short length of time. I thought it was goners, but within a week, new growth!
  44. 5 points
    Here’s mine. Got it as a seedling around 2017, then transplanted from my old place in 2019 which probably set it back slightly. In the last 12 months it has fully established and is now rocketing along.
  45. 5 points
    Here is a canary island date palm that s as spears to have survived the big freeze in Dallas
  46. 5 points
    Another year gone by... aztropic Mesa,Arizona
  47. 5 points
    Who you callin' ugly? Had these mammalian garbage disposals hanging out by the coop tonight, I've seen at least 10 generations congregate in this area. It looks like mom kicked them out about 4 days ago. Fortunately they do not like raw chicken.
  48. 4 points
    A rare sight in the desert, where people live anyway, fat Washingtonia filifera w/ skirts: Brahea armata, and their fuzzy petioles: Brahea brandegeei ...Sick of Sabal uresana yet?? But!, but!, there's so many... ( Many more than i took pictures of ) Didn't think so. Onward to the rest of the garden. As usual, broken down by plant group. Enjoy!!
  49. 4 points
    A guy in North Carolina planted a robusta on an island. I hope it makes it and grows huge. We'll see.
  50. 4 points
    I retooled this bed, amending the soil and added a C. Humilis, similar to yours, a few weeks ago. I kept the soil right around it very sandy though and hit it with fertilizer. Piled on mulch thick, to protect the whole area, but kept it away from the base of the plant so it would stay dryish and drain well in our rains. It responded by immediately pushing and opening four spikes at once from the leading stem, and is pushing another three at once from there. I picked a highly suckering one from a bunch at the nursery, hoping to make a bushy octopus out of it as it grows. It’s already popping more suckers. They say these are slow.... so far it doesn’t seem very slow... Here’s a pick of when I put it in. It’s noticeably bigger already. I’m thinking the danger for these in Florida is being too wet, not too dry. They tolerate dryness well, from what folks report.
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